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Andrea

Changing Demographics

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Racial shifts speak volumes

I don't want to over quote but this is pretty interesting:

The popular perception of metro Atlanta as an urban core of blacks surrounded by white suburban counties grew increasingly out of date during the 1990s, and has collapsed completely in the first half of the current decade.

From 2000 to 2004, blacks, Hispanics and other racial minorities accounted for more than 80 percent of population growth in the 28-county metropolitan Atlanta area, according to a report issued this week by the Brookings Institution. Fifteen years ago, whites represented 71 percent of the region's population; today, they make up 57 percent of the 4.7 million people in metro Atlanta.

And the effect on the school systems is quite dramatic. That's remarkable, considering it was only about 30 years ago that the great waves of white flight took place, as whites sought to escape integrated schools:

Metro Atlanta [not the city of Atlanta, but the metro area]already has more black, Hispanic and other minority children residing here than white children, making white children — at 49.8 percent of that age group — just another minority group.

The earliest and clearest signs of this important trend can be seen in public schools.

Gwinnett County's school district, by far the largest in the state, is now majority-minority, meaning that minorities now account for a majority of the population. The Cobb County school district — the state's second largest and long perceived as overwhelmingly white — is destined to follow the same path.

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As a city becomes world class it also becomes much more diverse. I like this diversification in the area. I think it will help the area become even better by offering many different cultures. You can go to areas in Dekalb and Gwinnett and get this great Hispanic influence (Almost like you're in Mexico) and then you can go to Chamblee and get a China town vibe. Then you can go to South Atlanta and Clayton and feel the rich culture of African Americans, and then you can go to Alpharetta and see wasp culture first hand

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:lol: Newnan, that's great!

And you can go to Tech and see Yellow Jacket culture first hand.

But it would be nice if all those cultures that Newnan mentioned were actually inside the city. Aside from Sweet Auburn, we don't have too many famous ethnic enclaves.

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As a city becomes world class it also becomes much more diverse. I like this diversification in the area. I think it will help the area become even better by offering many different cultures. You can go to areas in Dekalb and Gwinnett and get this great Hispanic influence (Almost like you're in Mexico) and then you can go to Chamblee and get a China town vibe. Then you can go to South Atlanta and Clayton and feel the rich culture of African Americans, and then you can go to Alpharetta and see wasp culture first hand

Overall, I think its very nice to see Atlanta devesifying like it is, but...these communities will probably never have the feel, or mainly the accessability, as the same communities found in New York, Chicago, or San Fran. Each of these communities are extremely detached from each other and the rest of the city. Like the rest of the cities neighborhoods (culturally diverse or otherwise) they do not intigrate and blend with the city on any level. When I drive through a part of town where there is a large Asian influance I never get the feel like I would in Chinatown in Chicago or San Fran. There is no Mexicotown like in Detroit, the countless cultural districts in New York. Atlanta may have some cultural infuences...but I dont think Atl will ever be on par with these other cities as far as culture goes...not anytime soon anyway.

Like you stated...in Chamblee you get a Chinatown vibe...but I doubt it will ever be like the ones in Chicago, NY, and especially San Fran. I think due to the cities form more than anything... Its hard to compete with real cities when all you are is one big suburb. (I might get in trouble with that statement :ph34r: )

Hopefully I'm wrong.

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just a warning, you might get in some trouble for saying that. However, I do agree with you to some extent. Outside of the Urban core, metro Atlanta is pretty much suburban. But hey, at least we have developing ethnic enclaaves.

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just a warning, you might get in some trouble for saying that. However, I do agree with you to some extent. Outside of the Urban core, metro Atlanta is pretty much suburban. But hey, at least we have developing ethnic enclaaves.

Im just voicing a frustration...the urban part of Atlanta is quite small though. and way too expensive. I wasnt too sure about posting...

but for that matter...what makes a city...a real city? I always figured it needed things like..walkability, transit, diversity, population, density etc

but maybe I'm wrong...maybe it is just population.

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The only reason schools seem so diverse is because a lot of "wealthier" people put their kids in private school.

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but for that matter...what makes a city...a real city? I always figured it needed things like..walkability, transit, diversity, population, density etc

but maybe I'm wrong...maybe it is just population.

I truly don't think that population makes a city "real." While it's definitely a factor, walkability, transit, diversity, and density are all more important. Take New York as an example (I suppose it's a real city)... I think what makes it real - more than anything - is the way so many diverse people are forced to interact as part of their daily lives. Maybe this isn't by choice, but it's reality. Why? Because most people in the city are not totally dependent on their cars, and instead either walk and/or take mass transit. Why?? Because the city is compact, dense, and has a massive public transit system (not to mention parking costs a fortune).

Not sure what my point is, but how does a great city like Atlanta (along with countless other US cities) built around highways and suburbs really every change its car culture to become a 'real' city? I hope there's an answer.

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We all know that Gwinnett is the most diverse county in Georgia, but I was still schocked to read the following article this morning in the AJC. 25% of Gwinnett County residents were born in another country. Gwinnett county is 19% black, 16% Latino, and 10% Asian. You can read the article here: Gwinnett Transformation

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We all know that Gwinnett is the most diverse county in Georgia, but I was still schocked to read the following article this morning in the AJC. 25% of Gwinnett County residents were born in another country. Gwinnett county is 19% black, 16% Latino, and 10% Asian. You can read the article here: Gwinnett Transformation

That is an amazing transformation in just 15+ years. Also metro Atlanta already has the 7th largest Korean community in the country and still rapidly growing.

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We all know that Gwinnett is the most diverse county in Georgia, but I was still schocked to read the following article this morning in the AJC. 25% of Gwinnett County residents were born in another country. Gwinnett county is 19% black, 16% Latino, and 10% Asian. You can read the article here: Gwinnett Transformation

Wow, that's interesting. It would be cool to see something like a mixed-use "International Village" development planned for Gwinnett, with a lot of ethnic restaurants, art and cultural venues, and some housing.

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There was an article a few weeks back in AJC detailing all the Asian mixed use developments planned or UC in Gwinnett County. Well, not all of them were mixed use, some were just Asian malls, etc. but some of them including the things your talking about.

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Wow, that's interesting. It would be cool to see something like a mixed-use "International Village" development planned for Gwinnett, with a lot of ethnic restaurants, art and cultural venues, and some housing.

There are several "International Villages" proposed for the area including the Global Station thing with all those residential towers.

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I know its not in Gwinnett county but isnt there a big mixed use development going up in Chamblee? Seems like I saw signs for it last time I was on Peachtree industrial Blvd.

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I know its not in Gwinnett county but isnt there a big mixed use development going up in Chamblee? Seems like I saw signs for it last time I was on Peachtree industrial Blvd.

There is one development in Chamblee actually called "International Village" which was supposed begin construction this year but I don't know the status of it. Its supposed to have a market square, restaurants, shops, a hotel and a trade center.

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Gwinnett county is indeed a very diverse place. My company deals with several of the "International Markets" and other supermarkets there. Just to walk the aisles, peruse the departments (especially meat and seafood), or get lunch at their food courts is a lesson in diversity. These stores also have large departments with foreign appliance, movies, and music. If you get a chance, you ought to check them out!

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Gwinnett county is indeed a very diverse place. My company deals with several of the "International Markets" and other supermarkets there. Just to walk the aisles, peruse the departments (especially meat and seafood), or get lunch at their food courts is a lesson in diversity. These stores also have large departments with foreign appliance, movies, and music. If you get a chance, you ought to check them out!

And that is the problem with Gwinnett (and most suburban ATL, but definitely not Atlanta itself)...all the diversity is under the umbrella of "if you get a chance" or "if you have the time"...check it out. Otherwise, in Gwinnett we are all living in culturally sterile enclaves to jump in our automobiles so we can wave to the diversity as we drive by on 85. The diversity is not really a part of our lives, just something we read about in the AJC.

off topic...In a hundred years what are the historic preservationists going to clamor over save in Gwinnett (or everything else outside 285 for that matter, shoot...even most of the sunbelt) from the past 50 years of development??

the only way we are going to get real diversity and integration in the near future is in that small town inside 285 called Atlanta.

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As a city becomes world class it also becomes much more diverse. I like this diversification in the area. I think it will help the area become even better by offering many different cultures. You can go to areas in Dekalb and Gwinnett and get this great Hispanic influence (Almost like you're in Mexico) and then you can go to Chamblee and get a China town vibe. Then you can go to South Atlanta and Clayton and feel the rich culture of African Americans, and then you can go to Alpharetta and see wasp culture first hand

So, it's okay with you that it is only whites who are having their neighborhoods overtaken? The very fact of change, of which one demographic is being replaced by another, sets well with you?

What about poverty levels of racial minorities? What about crime? What about declining schools? What about blight? Most of all, however, what about the "WASP" culture that was prevalent in many of these communities, is its loss to be celebrated?

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I truly don't think that population makes a city "real." While it's definitely a factor, walkability, transit, diversity, and density are all more important. Take New York as an example (I suppose it's a real city)... I think what makes it real - more than anything - is the way so many diverse people are forced to interact as part of their daily lives. Maybe this isn't by choice, but it's reality. Why? Because most people in the city are not totally dependent on their cars, and instead either walk and/or take mass transit. Why?? Because the city is compact, dense, and has a massive public transit system (not to mention parking costs a fortune).

Not sure what my point is, but how does a great city like Atlanta (along with countless other US cities) built around highways and suburbs really every change its car culture to become a 'real' city? I hope there's an answer.

They are "real cities", just not the type you're familiar with.

Furthermore, what does racial and cultural diversity have to do with being a real city? I'd say nothing.

That is an amazing transformation in just 15+ years. Also metro Atlanta already has the 7th largest Korean community in the country and still rapidly growing.

I'm sure that you're smiling with glee, all because old whitey is being exterminated.

There was an article a few weeks back in AJC detailing all the Asian mixed use developments planned or UC in Gwinnett County. Well, not all of them were mixed use, some were just Asian malls, etc. but some of them including the things your talking about.

"Asian Malls". Lovely :rolleyes: Somebody forgot to tell those folks that we're in the U.S. and to acculturate themselves with the population.

There are several "International Villages" proposed for the area including the Global Station thing with all those residential towers.

"International Villages"? Is that the same thing they tout an "International Village" in Dekalb and Gwinnett, an area where a lot of illegal alien Mexicans and or legal Asians moved into the area and decided to live like they are back in their home countries? You know, where newcomers don't think that they should acculturate. Meanwhile, native-born Americans are forced out while foreign culture occupies an American town? How classy.

Gwinnett county is indeed a very diverse place. My company deals with several of the "International Markets" and other supermarkets there. Just to walk the aisles, peruse the departments (especially meat and seafood), or get lunch at their food courts is a lesson in diversity. These stores also have large departments with foreign appliance, movies, and music. If you get a chance, you ought to check them out!

Yes, because we know that newcomers should not acculturate themselves.

And that is the problem with Gwinnett (and most suburban ATL, but definitely not Atlanta itself)...all the diversity is under the umbrella of "if you get a chance" or "if you have the time"...check it out. Otherwise, in Gwinnett we are all living in culturally sterile enclaves to jump in our automobiles so we can wave to the diversity as we drive by on 85. The diversity is not really a part of our lives, just something we read about in the AJC.

off topic...In a hundred years what are the historic preservationists going to clamor over save in Gwinnett (or everything else outside 285 for that matter, shoot...even most of the sunbelt) from the past 50 years of development??

the only way we are going to get real diversity and integration in the near future is in that small town inside 285 called Atlanta.

The suburbs are more diverse than the "city". Why are you so obsessed about diversity? You refer to less diverse areas as "sterile". Don't you see the negativity you apply in such terminology? I suppose you wish that everything about traditional America be destroyed for the "diversification wave".

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whoa, chill out. Did you just get back from a Klan rally or something? American culture is a mix of lots of different cultures and our culture is still changing because of that. I hate to point the finger of racism, but it sounds like you are very passionate about preserving the WASP race in this country. If you're constantly disapproving of the immigrant influence here, then you should just move to another country. Our country was shaped by immigrants, including your immigrnat ancestors who might have been oppressed by ignorant and closed minded people who think just like you.

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whoa, chill out. Did you just get back from a Klan rally or something? American culture is a mix of lots of different cultures and our culture is still changing because of that. I hate to point the finger of racism, but it sounds like you are very passionate about preserving the WASP race in this country. If you're constantly disapproving of the immigrant influence here, then you should just move to another country. Our country was shaped by immigrants, including your immigrnat ancestors who might have been oppressed by ignorant and closed minded people who think just like you.

Newman, you're throwing out old tired cliches. Let's look at this logically, shall we.

Up until the year 1965, the United States had an immigration policy designed to keep the nation majority white (European decent). For you to argue about the immigration influence, of which I have not once stated was not part of America's past, is a little unusual.

My point is that immigrants should acculturate themselves to the general American culture. If you don't know what that is, then you're blind. Living like you're still in China, Taiwan, Mexico, or wherever is the complete opposite of what America has traditionally been. Though people came from various places, most likely different European countries, they acculturated themselves and assimilated.

You tell me, how is an "Asian" market acculturation? That fact is, it's not. You can try to deny it, but you what I am saying is true.

I find it laughable that you'd throw up the klan reference. It always speaks of a weak mind, one who is unable to separate the hear and now from the past and the future. You see, I'm a very rounded person. I realize that this country is not only affected in the hear and now. Policies have implications, and there are consequences for those policies that our children and grandchildren will have to live with. If you believe that white people don't have a right to be the majority population in the United States, then you are going completely against what American history was for up until 1965. You're going against the homogeneity that made this country strong. This diverse hodge podge of a mess of a nation will ultimately weaken itself, if it is to survive at all. However, you can live in your land of make believe, while pretending that all immigrants and peoples are the same, and that they all contribute in a like manner, economically, socially, and culturally to the national glue. I know it's a farce, and I realize that the destruction of the European American population is nothing more than genocide, with a nice relabeled spin on it known as "diversity".

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You are a well rounded bigot. Your primary arguement is based on race & nothing else.

Teshadoh, are you interested in a logical debate, for I'm all for it. However, if all you're going to do is verbally assault me, then you really have no argument. Everything I have stated is true, yet many of you turn your head to it, or you try to make it out to be something good. We all know that it is not, so don't try to make it into something wonderful to be desired.

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