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bzorch

Defining Lofts

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Could someone explain to me how the phrases "McMansion" and "McLoft" arose? My assumption is that it's a reference to McDonald's, but in what way are the two linked? Ubiquity? Large numbers? Convenient? Popular? "I'm lovin' it?"

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My guess would be as always the leading company in an industry that epitomizes characteristics that the majority fairly or unfairly dislike (i.e. McDonalds, Walmart, etc) tends to get transferred to other aspects of society because they are catchy and people can immediate relate to them. The McMansion is an overly large mass produced house on a small lot that is designed to look like a mansion. So in reality it is trying to be something that it is not. Like the McLoft in the suburbs.

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Could someone explain to me how the phrases "McMansion" and "McLoft" arose? My assumption is that it's a reference to McDonald's, but in what way are the two linked? Ubiquity? Large numbers? Convenient? Popular? "I'm lovin' it?"

I got this from a quick google of the term mcmansion.... makes sense, I guess:

"McMansion" is a pejorative term for a particular style of housing that, as its name suggests, is both large like a mansion and while superficially a good value, possessing standards of quality (within a developer) and ubiquitous like McDonald's fast food restaurants, lacks "nutritional" value (in the sense that a house nurtures its occupants).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McMansion

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In today's Tennessean there's an article about the loft boom in Nashville, which includes "hard" and "soft" lofts. Definitely a follow-up to downtown_cliff's post about his talking with a reporter.

http://tennessean.com/apps/pbcs.dll/articl...S0303/604020340

That's a good article. It's obvious to me I had no idea what a loft is myself. But based on everything posted in this article and the others, it could be described as an open style of architecture with exposed ductwork, typically with wooden floors, and other materials typically found in older buildings. The size and cost can vary from small/relatively inexpensive to huge/very expensive. While most lofts today are contructed in old buildings, lofts can be constructed in new buildings as well. I would assume that this is a fairly broad definition, and I'm sure there are many who would prefer a more restrictive defintion than this.

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