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  1. 1. Will Atlanta ever top it's peak population?

    • No.
      10
    • Yes, within 5 yrs.
      52
    • Yes, within 10 yrs.
      33
    • Yes, within 20 yrs. or longer
      15


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As Atlanta's intown continues to flourish, it's becoming the in place to live and play

There was an interesting article in the AJC highlighting the growth that is occuring in the central city. As Mayor Franklin said, as the metro grows, so will the city. It's good to see a politician not single minded. Atlanta as a region should work together.

10,000 people last year, continuing a growth spurt that has pushed the population higher than it has been in at least 25 years. Those who follow Atlanta population trends say the newcomers are likely to be well educated, well heeled and well intentioned.
Here's another interesting quote:

Atlanta's Beltline

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As Atlanta's intown continues to flourish, it's becoming the in place to live and play

There was an interesting article in the AJC highlighting the growth that is occuring in the central city. As Mayor Franklin said, as the metro grows, so will the city. It's good to see a politician not single minded. Atlanta as a region should work together.

Here's another interesting quote:

Read the full article here:

Growth in Atlanta

Shirley Franklin is key to the upswing in population I believe. She has been one of the few mayors to bring the entire region together and probably the most successful. She avoids controversy and instead reaches out to all the diverse groups in the city. She is also the first mayor to finally break the endless, stupid cycle of black vs white politics in the city. Under her leadership we'll see Atlanta surpass its peak population and set ourselves up to build a much larger and robust city! :yahoo:

Edited by tarikj

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So Atlanta has to be getting pretty close to that mark I would think. BTW, I like Shirley Franklin, but I don't think she is the reason for Atlanta's intown growth as much as she is the product of Atlanta's intown growth.

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I like her as well and am very happy with how she is handling things but I wouldn't give her the credit for the intown resurgence.

This happens all over and was bound to happen here eventually. People move to the suburbs seeking bigger houses and yards for less money. Of course then everyone ends up in the suburbs and traffic becomes a nightmare. Eventually people get tired of spending their life in their car and move back into town.

Atlanta has another thing in its favor in that there is a very large number of people moving down from the Northeast so living in the City is what they're used to. It's also not as expensive as people who have lived here their entire life seem to think it is.

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Of course she's not totally responsible for the intown growth but I don't have any doubt that it wouldn't be nearly as robust without her reaching out to the development community and improving the permit process. There was extreme mistrust of the city gov't among the development community and the permitting system was dysfunctional and corrupt.

There were developers that would not do business in this city under the previous administration.

The market factors were there, probably for some time, but I do think Shirley helped the potential to be realized.

Edited by Martinman

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I decided to look up some of the metro 2006 permit numbers since this thread was bumped up.

Jurisdiction - Units

Atlanta - 10,779

Gwinnett - 8,880

Fulton (minus Atlanta) - 7,710

Forsyth - 4,770

Dekalb - 4,555

Cobb - 4,526

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Those figures show the real depth of the Intown boom. These numbers are absolutely historic for the City, and I would love to know how this ranks Atlanta nationally in permits.

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Yes, this just validates what many have known all along, the city is growing by leaps and bounds. People in the suburbs are tired of the long commutes and desire a walkable city with art, theater, attractions, parks, restaurants, night life, and yes shopping.

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By the way the revised 2005 estimate for the city is 483,108.

Almost there...

I'm guessing that means we've got a good chance of reaching 497,000 (and maybe 500,000) next year, then (assuming nothing drastic happens)?

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The latest census estimates are out, and as of July 1, 2006, Atlanta's population stood at 486,411, which is up from 476,483 from one year prior. The city is definitely getting closer to the half million mark, and I would expect it to hit that figure before the end of the decade.

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The latest census estimates are out, and as of July 1, 2006, Atlanta's population stood at 486,411, which is up from 476,483 from one year prior. The city is definitely getting closer to the half million mark, and I would expect it to hit that figure before the end of the decade.

I agree totally with you krazeeboi, this is an exciting time for the city of Atlanta! For the first time since "white flight" started in the early 1970's the city is gaining population rather than loosing population. More housing is under construction than ever before in the city's history, whether it be single family, low rise, midrise, or high rise towers. Plus take note that Atlanta city proper covers only 132,000 sq miles which is very small compared to other sunbelt cities like Dallas, Charlotte, and Houston. And especially western cities like Pheonix, San Diego, and Los Angeles. Yep Atlanta is going to make it or even surpass it. Plus I credit alot of this to Mayor Shirley Franklin, she is probably the best mayor the city has ever had, and is very development minded.

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The latest census estimates are out, and as of July 1, 2006, Atlanta's population stood at 486,411, which is up from 476,483 from one year prior. The city is definitely getting closer to the half million mark, and I would expect it to hit that figure before the end of the decade.

We might could reach it by the end of 2008 if the current trends keep up. However, I'm just glad to see more people moving into the city rather than out of it.

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^Definitely. And the city has done this without going on major annexation-related land grabs, which is remarkable. Atlanta is truly densifying.

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^Definitely. And the city has done this without going on major annexation-related land grabs, which is remarkable. Atlanta is truly densifying.

Yep, and with the exception of some little parcels that it might "accumulate" over time, I think Atlanta's pretty much set in its boundaries for the next several years--or at least that's my theory. This, of course, would mean that any growth that the city sees would actually mean an increase in density rather than just land area--which is how many cities as of late, especially Southern and Western ones, seem to be gaining most of their people.

You never know, though, some city or large unincorporated area (such as College Park, East Point, Hapeville, etc.) might want to be annexed by us at some at some point in the future, though.

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You never know, though, some city or large unincorporated area (such as College Park, East Point, Hapeville, etc.) might want to be annexed by us at some at some point in the future, though.

That's a different situation, and it's actually a good thing. That means that an area recognizes the benefits of being included in the dominant city and won't contribute to further balkanization of the metro area by incorporating (like Chattahoochee Hill Country, but I digress).

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That's a different situation, and it's actually a good thing. That means that an area recognizes the benefits of being included in the dominant city and won't contribute to further balkanization of the metro area by incorporating (like Chattahoochee Hill Country, but I digress).

Actually, I've never viewed annexation as a bad thing, I was just pointing out that I don't think Atlanta will be making any major annexations any time soon.

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But I believe Atlanta did make a significant annexation a few months ago around the Ben Hill area. There is a good chance Atlanta may make further annexations there.

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^That was probably the first one in a very long time.

Ironchapman, I do agree with you; annexation isn't a bad thing, so as long as it doesn't compromise the services that the city is able to offer to the annexed areas. The fiscal health of cities is directly related to how many people that take advantage of the city's services are actually located within the city.

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Anyway, I believe we truely will be over half a million people in two years. That of course is just my own opinion based on housing permits and development underway, and future development that will take place.

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But I believe Atlanta did make a significant annexation a few months ago around the Ben Hill area. There is a good chance Atlanta may make further annexations there.

I had forgotten about the Ben Hill area. Thanks for reminding me. That is quite a significant addition to the city.

Ironchapman, I do agree with you; annexation isn't a bad thing, so as long as it doesn't compromise the services that the city is able to offer to the annexed areas. The fiscal health of cities is directly related to how many people that take advantage of the city's services are actually located within the city.

Exactly. :thumbsup:

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Anyway, I believe we truely will be over half a million people in two years. That of course is just my own opinion based on housing permits and development underway, and future development that will take place.

So I see a very bright future ahead for my city, and some of you suburbanites might want to consider a move into the city.

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But I believe Atlanta did make a significant annexation a few months ago around the Ben Hill area. There is a good chance Atlanta may make further annexations there.

Unfortunately the city blew that one... The Sand Hill neighborhood Assoc. was ready to be annexed (17,000 folks +/-)... the city dropped the ball at a neighborhood meeting when asked about a 'schedule for providing services' and the neighborhood voted NO to being annexed... missing a golden chance at expanded population and tax base...

Edited by verge

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