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UNC-Charlotte Construction


unccmyway

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A $10 million gift will build a "student outdoor event venue and tailgate park". If you squint it looks a bit like a sprawly (based on location on the edge of campus beside a five line highway) version of the Grove at Old Miss.

$10 million gift to help transform the Charlotte student experience

Student Outdoor Event Venue

https://inside.charlotte.edu/news-features/2022-02-01/10-million-gift-help-transform-charlotte-student-experience

Edited by kermit
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  • 1 month later...

Yes, they were my opinions and still very proud of what I saw.  If there are other examples of what I saw in Indianapolis and in South Carolina, well ok, there's rarely anything totally new under the sun.  Doesn't change my enjoyment of the campus, and I'm choosing to revel in the simple joy of the beauty in what I saw, then to critique and compare unto my own dissatisfaction.  Ivy League schools as a peer group are quite old, and age is likely a factor in their charm, or a factor in people's perception of their charm & beauty.  UNCC can't beat them on the variable of age and its impact on history and renown, but discounting that age variable, I believe UNCC has done a phenomenal job, and the campus is set up to age incredibly well.  Would rather walk its grounds than those of UPenn and Dartmouth any day.

Perhaps what UNCC lacks in age, it makes up for it in inclusivity and local relevance:tw_blush:.

Edited by RANYC
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For those who visit a private university and compare to a public, a major difference is land use. Public institutions must extract value from all land, while private institutions may be extravagant in their open space. Public universities need to consider their future expansion of perhaps thousands of students over time while private schools have much less concern for such issues. Public schools may have lovely landscaping but it is limited to the space between the buildings and the streets. Privates have grand greenscapes, trees, entrances, quads and courts. Publics far less so. Privates have art in the building lobbies, carpet, soft surfaces that are allowed with less traffic and footfall. They may have interior plants with horticultural care, just everything that says money. Publics must make the most of their limited appropriation.*

I attended UNCC in the early 70's, my wife was in the original class that attended the first four years at the current location. The buildings of that time were useful rather than beautiful. The dormitories were brutalist concrete structures, a blot on the landscape, the sky and the eyes. There was no continuity of design. The redesign from ~30 years ago envisioned a Carolina brick appearance that expresses the architectural vernacular of our region, a common appearance, and a sense of timelessness. My issue is that a visit makes it difficult to locate a structure since they are so similar. 

*I was in the James B. Hunt research library at the NCSU Centennial Campus last week. It is a fine contemporary building that expresses the building function from the outside, as good architecture should. No open stacks. One requests a book from the online resource and a robot retrieval system removes the book from 40-50 foot high shelves and containers and using RFID or some similar technology delivers the book to the patron. Much electronic resource space, meetings and more. The only art, other than the colors of the building and the design was a traditional painting in the lobby of the former governor himself. Centennial Campus is the exception to the Public school space constraint factor. 

 

Edited by tarhoosier
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42 minutes ago, tarhoosier said:

For those who visit a private university and compare to a public, a major difference is land use. Public institutions must extract value from all land, while private institutions may be extravagant in their open space. Public universities need to consider their future expansion of perhaps thousands of students over time while private schools have much less concern for such issues. Public schools may have lovely landscaping but it is limited to the space between the buildings and the streets. Privates have grand greenscapes, trees, entrances, quads and courts. Publics far less so. Privates have art in the building lobbies, carpet, soft surfaces that are allowed with less traffic and footfall. They may have interior plants with horticultural care, just everything that says money. Publics must make the most of their limited appropriation.*

I attended UNCC in the early 70's, my wife was in the original class that attended the first four years at the current location. The buildings of that time were useful rather than beautiful. The dormitories were brutalist concrete structures, a blot on the landscape, the sky and the eyes. There was no continuity of design. The redesign from ~30 years ago envisioned a Carolina brick appearance that expresses the architectural vernacular of our region, a common appearance, and a sense of timelessness. My issue is that a visit makes it difficult to locate a structure since they are so similar. 

*I was in the James B. Hunt research library at the NCSU Centennial Campus last week. It is a fine contemporary building that expresses the building function from the outside, as good architecture should. No open stacks. One requests a book from the online resource and a robot retrieval system removes the book from 40-50 foot high shelves and containers and using RFID or some similar technology delivers the book to the patron. Much electronic resource space, meetings and more. The only art, other than the colors of the building and the design was a traditional painting in the lobby of the former governor himself. Centennial Campus is the exception to the Public school space constraint factor. 

 

Interesting points.  Thanks for sharing.  Will agree the buildings don't much celebrate eclecticism.  I thoroughly enjoyed the Carolina brick realism, and why not find the deepest, most extensive, most uniform, and purest expression of Carolina brick than on a Carolina campus in the largest city in the Carolinas:tw_smirk:

Edited by RANYC
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12-15 years is a little ridiculous. By that time these planned improvements will likely be outdated themselves. 

Don’t think you understand what that means…that is the road map timeline for all improvements. It is a reasonable timeline considering all of these upgrades they’re planning for.
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3 hours ago, JeanClt said:


Don’t think you understand what that means…that is the road map timeline for all improvements. It is a reasonable timeline considering all of these upgrades they’re planning for.

12-15 years to build two clubhouses, a field, and renovate existing spaces is ridiculous. For comparison, the entire football stadium was built in 2 years. 

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12-15 years to build two clubhouses, a field, and renovate existing spaces is ridiculous. For comparison, the entire football stadium was built in 2 years. 

While that may be true, there are other things that go into this plan. It’s not all about shoveling dirt, pouring concrete, and placing bricks. There’s a lot more that goes on in the background to get these projects completed whether the administration likes it or not. There is no cutting corners or quick way around it if it’s to be done right. Finances are also a huge undertaking considering they plan to make it all privately funded. (If I read that correctly). Unfortunately not every private entity is itching to dump money wherever it’s requested or fundraised.

(The stadium expansion is in the first phase if that’s what you’re worried about lol) *jokes*

There are also schedules that need to be worked around. If they are to play while this is going on (which is likely a goal) things will take time to complete versus shutting everything down. Accommodations slow construction and buildouts.
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