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Cadeho

Cobblestones!

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I love cobblestones! They're beautiful, for the most part maintenence free, there's a certain elegance about them (probably being granite in mist cases and we know how granite can make things luxurious), and those with dirt and grass between them can cut down on runoff. At least that's how I feel. People have gotten spoiled by smooth black pavement that develop pot holes every year. Just because we have it doesn't mean we should always use it with no alternatives. Every time I am in an older area that's been paved over, wherever the cobblestones are exposed, I take a pic. Proof that they are superior to asphalt pavement or there wouldn't be holes. And what is it about large sections of pavement missing or wearing thin? Just scrap the asphalt. Then I look at some areas where the asphalt has been pushed up onto the curb by the traffic and it looks even more terrible pushed up over granite curbs. Also, it looks terrible when cobblestone streets have asphalt patches. What did they do with the stones when they dug them up? They couldn't put them back?

When I think of old cities like those in Europe I think of the stones. The Romans did it best. We were on the right track, then like with everything else, things changed and people just went with it. We're an old city too, why hide it? We preserve our buildings, put up imitation gas lanterns and signs to match, but when it comes to the streets, they don't match. We don't have to have every street or new street using cobblestones, but the places that have them and are historic areas with a historic context, why not have them? Why not uncover them completely on Canal from 12th to Virginia; uncover them on Dock and Cary from 14th to Pear (some have paving block and I don't know where some have those ugly concrete slabs and it may be better to start Dock's cobbles at 17th), Main from either 14th, 15th, or 17th to Orleans St (mainly paving block, and the concrete slabs from Ash to Nicholson need to come up), Franklin from Amber to 25th, Grace from Ambler to 21st (concrete slabs have to go) and Broad, I don't know, probably just uncover the paving block. I don't know how far up Broad it goes but to have paving block it between Crane and 21st would be nice. As far as Church Hill goes, I don't know if it was cobbled. Burt or Eddie can you remember?

I know streets in Jackson Ward and Union Hill has cobblestones and those areas too should be exposed. Jackson from 1st to Price, DuVal from 1st to Brook. Then the concrete slabs should come up on the other streets (Clay comes to mind but I can't remember if Marshall has them). What did Leigh have? The streetsof North Jackson Ward also have stones under them... Valley road too.

Anyway I know people are dead set against cobblestones for some weird reason, but they can add to the city since they aren't what most streets have anymore. Plus, they can definitely slow traffic. Now some drawbacks is that they can be slippery when wet and they can be uneven and uneasy on the foot.

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I guess it depends on the even-ness or uneven-ness but the cobblestone streets I driven on in Norfolk are terrible. You have to drive really slow but having a car with a stiff sport suspension doesn't help. I might add though they are really cool to see and add a lot of character. So I guess as long as I can observe them without having to drive on them I am ok! :D

Here is an example from Norfolk and the 2nd example is from Old Town Alexandria.

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DSC02412.jpg

Now after observing the pics together though I see Norfolk's are actually brick and Old Towns are cobblestone. Not sure if I have ever driven on an actual cobbletstone street now that I think of it.

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They are ideal for streets that should have a slower speed, especially if there are pedestrians or children.

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Come to Richmond, Guy, and drive thru Shockoe Slip. The beautiful cobblestones will jar the teeth out of your mouth. Oh, but they're beautiful! :lol:

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Cadeho !!!

I share your fondness of cobble stones, especially in residential, historic, restored areas and in pedestrian crosswalks. However, consider for a moment the era of cobblestones: the volume and weight of vehicular traffic was much lighter, not to mention the average speed, labor was relatively inexpensive and cobble stone was the material, more or less, at hand. More fluid pavements were expensive, labor intensive and, for the most part, impractical. Fast forward to today. Modern highways (streets) are constructed to carry large volumes of traffic, comparative heavy loads and allow for appropriate speeds. Additionally, modern paving materials allow for relative ease of accessing utilities and resultant repairs conforming to their surrounds. The present use of cobble stones is compounded by at least two hindering aspects: the necessity of a non-yielding, yet flexible, sub-base and the inability to readily conform to subterranean utilities (i.e. most of those asphalt patches that you encounter are either a failure of the sub-base or backfill from utility servicing).

I fully endorse cobble stones in their aforementioned, proper places. I, as you, believe that cobblestones are an excellent means of retaining historical significance, preserving character and maintaining correct vehicular speeds. However, to conform to modern standards, the expense of a proper foundation and utility servicing must be considered.

Referring to the preceding pictures: not a manhole one can be detected, the streets are residential (light weight and vehicular loads) and the choice of pavers is commensurate to the area. (BTW, in

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Thanks Eddie. I see your point but the cobblestones are underneath most of our old streets if they hadn't been replaced with concrete slabs or if the street wasn't originally dirt. The stone seem to be holding up under additional pressure of the asphalt on top of them and the volume of traffic on them now. Ours seem to be sturdy enough to support the weight of modern vehicles. Whoever laid them many years ago, laid them well.

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Ah, But I like it too!

I love the cobblestones in the local Richmond area. Somewhat wish there were more.

I know when I jet down monument to slow down as I should be going slower. They make the city look authentic.

My only issue is the areas where they have been patched with Asphalt, and then the patch has sunken in.

Many of Richmonds alley ways still have the stones in place and can wreck your car.

I don't understand fully why the city does'nt maintain then better as they hold up much better than the asphalt as you guys stated before.

Mark me down for the cobblestones :thumbsup:

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