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NewTowner

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From all indications Tony is still optimistic about the Signature. Channel 2 interviewed him yesterday about the new May Town Center and in the interview they asked about the Sig.

Here is the a snippet of the article.

"When asked about the building's future, Giarratana said,

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Yeah tall steel frame buildings bend and sway in the wind, so I wouldn't say you're a whole lot worse off in a skyscraper than in a wood framed house. Secondly, people who suggest against building skyscrapers due to fear of terrorism should not be included in any serious discussion and should barricade themselves in a bomb shelter. I mean that's like saying we shouldn't build cities above ground because of possible nuclear attacks from China or Russia.

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Yeah tall steel frame buildings bend and sway in the wind, so I wouldn't say you're a whole lot worse off in a skyscraper than in a wood framed house. Secondly, people who suggest against building skyscrapers due to fear of terrorism should not be included in any serious discussion and should barricade themselves in a bomb shelter. I mean that's like saying we shouldn't build cities above ground because of possible nuclear attacks from China or Russia.

here here! i agree :thumbsup:

plus i'm sure they have some sort of safety procedure in place during "worse case scenarios" for residents.

people aren't dumb.

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True, Pompus, but as someone who was staying in downtown Ft.Worth in March 2000, I know first hand that the biggest danger in modern hi rises is with the glass.

Agreed, falling glass is definitely a serious risk. Hopefully people are smart enough not to walk around freely in the open while a tornado annihilates downtown Nashville. Inside a skyscraper the wind would pass through the building once the glass has blown out, so make sure you’re in the hallway and not in the cubicle with the nice view. Shatter resistant glass ameliorates some of the risk, but not all of course. In general, I think this structure would look pretty magnificent for Nashville’s skyline; albeit the height may be a tad too much. I think an aesthetically pleasing crown for Nashville’s skyline that’s only 2/3 occupied would be better than no crown at all.

- Moderator's note: A tad too snarky remark had to be removed from this post. Lets watch what we say to not offend anyone, even if we are jesting. -

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We may need to get the topic back on track. Probably my fault here.

I don't know what else can be said. On the surface this project seems to be at a dead stop. Every news report is negative toward any immediate progress. I hope behind the scenes Mr Giarratana is making headway on sales. He doesn't owe us any news but it sure would nice to know how many units are actually sold. If he still is stuck in the low 100s then I believe he either has to pony up some other way to fund it or offer a serious new marketing strategy.

Since I believe we agree that it is the 50% dollar amount that matters, if he could sell the significantly more expensive upper floors he could potentially sell only 140 or so and still make the 50% dollar value.

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Tony said 110 of 200 units are "reserved" according to Channel 4 and he also said he is close to naming a new General Contractor. He said height approvals and airway approvals should be in hand by spring as well. Things, according to the man behind this project, are moving ahead albeit slower than we want it to.

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ground will be broken eventually. I mean, look at how long it took west end summit to get going and yes, I believe that one will start to rise soon too. This is a first and a huge deal for this city so issues are inevitable. Besides, tony g said that he is willing to pay money out of his own pocket to get this going vertical. That's real dedication.

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^I knew someone was going to say that. I cited only my opinion. Agreement isn't required.

I done think he would have spent money and installed a live feed to advertise a lake. I think he knows something we don't. As far as signature is concerned, I don't expect it to break ground this spring but later this year. If not by then, then who knows what will happen.

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I've never been too thrilled about this project, at 70 stories, and not too disappointed if it doesn't get built. I still feel like 50 stories would have been a better looking building for Nashville.

I wonder if Tony has considered building this in Atlanta instead?

Bring it on!! If it were here I have little doubt it would already be under construction and maybe even taller. It wouldn't shock me if they put a supertall in Buckhead.

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After driving through Midtown Atlanta this past weekend and sitting at the corner of Peachtree NE and 10th st looking up at BOA... trying to put it in perspective at 5th and Church. The more I looked at it and discussed it with my wife, I am starting to think that it will almost look ridiculus. Tony's renders are useful enough, but being right next an actual structure makes me doubt that it will work. I am starting to think a Pickard Chilton tower, not unlike 1180 Peachtree might be a better centerpiece...

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I've never been too thrilled about this project, at 70 stories, and not too disappointed if it doesn't get built. I still feel like 50 stories would have been a better looking building for Nashville.

I wonder if Tony has considered building this in Atlanta instead?

http://nashville.bizjournals.com/nashville...us7.html?page=1

i doubt it, particulary given the fact that the players in the luxury atlanta market are large enough to devour tony in a single bite. also, as you can see from this article, nobody in atlanta had an epiphany two years ago after seeing siggy unveiled. john williams not only didn't attempt a tower as large there (though mansion at 42 stories is no slouch), he also had this to say about tony's plans 18 months ago:

Williams dismisses notions that it makes Atlanta developers nervous to hear of a massive skyscraper being planned in Nashville. "Actually, it would make me nervous to be building a big skyscraper there. Nashville's not a huge city," he said.

i can't help wonder whether tony now wishes he'd heeded this veterans advice. here is a link to the mansion project in buckhead which i think demonstrates how little building height really seems to appeal to the well heeled crowd that tony has been chasing.

http://www.mansiononpeachtree.com

there's been a lot of second guessing on this link about why tony hasn't gotten any traction. if you look closely at the floorplans, marketing and location of mansion (and the size of market differences) you can't help but see some glaring differences between the two that go beyond height. and only 42 large condos rather than 420 ? interesting considering how much more wealth density there is in atlanta.

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^LOL, the developers in Atlanta think too highly of themselves. There are maybe 1 or 2 places in North America that could actually justify the building of a 70 story residential tower and Atlanta is not one of them. Announcing one of the tallest towers in the world has a way of getting one instant free attention on a national basis for a product that mainly appeals to the unwarranted real estate excess that has been going on in the USA.

The reality of the situation is that most people would not actually want to live in a building this tall. I am surprised that nobody has talked to the compromises the residents of the John Hancock Center in Chicago make to live in that tower. I doubt that many would want to live like that on a day to day basis. The most expensive property in NYC, by far, are the town homes where one can step out onto the street. Not condos in tall towers.

Americans have gone through a 20 year phase of building mcmansions, luxury condos, and other places that don't make much practical sense and are designed mostly to appeal to those who still measure worth based on the size of one's pocket book. The signature tower comes at the end, from what I can see of that cycle and will most likely be a victim of that timing. Many people are now demanding more sensible and eco friendly buildings that are not so over the top.

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^ i agree with your points but i didn't really see williams' comments as arrogant. the numbers are what they are in terms of population. considering his accomplishments and the prospect of a nashville paper calling him to ask if he was "nervous" about signature, i thought he was quite glib. and again, in retrospect, it seems like he offered tony some good advice.

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I moved to Nashville because of its size. I really enjoy Nashville. I considered moving to Atlanta, but realized Atlanta is FAR from giving me the QUALITY of life that I have in Nashville. You guys should try to hold on to Nashville as it is and try not to get too big. The bigger, the more problems. I personally like Nashville better. I think the people here are more genuine. I hate to say it, but it seems like everybody I know and meet that live in Atlanta are so superficial and claim they live like Bill and Melinda Gates, but when you get to know them and see how they are really living, it's the complete opposite.

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I moved to Nashville because of its size. I really enjoy Nashville. I considered moving to Atlanta, but realized Atlanta is FAR from giving me the QUALITY of life that I have in Nashville. You guys should try to hold on to Nashville as it is and try not to get too big. The bigger, the more problems. I personally like Nashville better. I think the people here are more genuine. I hate to say it, but it seems like everybody I know and meet that live in Atlanta are so superficial and claim they live like Bill and Melinda Gates, but when you get to know them and see how they are really living, it's the complete opposite.

I am so pleased that you enjoy Nashville, but I think your assertion that growth, regardless of the quality of that growth and what form it comes in, automatically comes with a preset package of problems, is baseless and rather silly. I don't think the problems you're discussing come with growth. I think they come when a city grows like Atlanta. Obviously, that last part is just my opinion, but on the wider scale, I could show you a great deal of large cities world wide that likely don't have most of the problems you associate with big cities. Don't be afraid of progress, if it's positive.

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I am so pleased that you enjoy Nashville, but I think your assertion that growth, regardless of the quality of that growth and what form it comes in, automatically comes with a preset package of problems, is baseless and rather silly. I don't think the problems you're discussing come with growth. I think they come when a city grows like Atlanta. Obviously, that last part is just my opinion, but on the wider scale, I could show you a great deal of large cities world wide that likely don't have most of the problems you associate with big cities. Don't be afraid of progress, if it's positive.

You're right BNA..."smart growth" can prevent some of the problems we see in large cities. I'm hopeful there will be some in Nashville one day! :rolleyes:

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I am so pleased that you enjoy Nashville, but I think your assertion that growth, regardless of the quality of that growth and what form it comes in, automatically comes with a preset package of problems, is baseless and rather silly. I don't think the problems you're discussing come with growth. I think they come when a city grows like Atlanta. Obviously, that last part is just my opinion, but on the wider scale, I could show you a great deal of large cities world wide that likely don't have most of the problems you associate with big cities. Don't be afraid of progress, if it's positive.

Exactly. The growth problems associated with Atlanta do not have to be followed by Nashville. In fact, we can use Atlanta as the model of how not to grow. As a city grows it's better that is grow more dense and not grow as much outward. Cities and metropolitan areas much pass ordinances and enforce laws that encourage infill, and make it more difficult to grow outward. Unfortunately, Nashville is already huge in area, and is currently following the Atlanta model for the most part. If we follow our current course, From Park Ave to TN's fear of growth will be well founded. But the growth doesn't have to be bad. It's time that a regional growth plan be put into effect, supported by the many counties and cities within the metro area in a cooperative effort.

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Exactly. The growth problems associated with Atlanta do not have to be followed by Nashville. In fact, we can use Atlanta as the model of how not to grow. As a city grows it's better that is grow more dense and not grow as much outward. Cities and metropolitan areas much pass ordinances and enforce laws that encourage infill, and make it more difficult to grow outward. Unfortunately, Nashville is already huge in area, and is currently following the Atlanta model for the most part. If we follow our current course, From Park Ave to TN's fear of growth will be well founded. But the growth doesn't have to be bad. It's time that a regional growth plan be put into effect, supported by the many counties and cities within the metro area in a cooperative effort.

But how is that outward growth prevented? Do we have to do something to keep the Franklins, Murfreesboros and Hendersonvilles from growing?

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