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      WARNING!   07/26/16

      By reading or participating in the Coffee House forum, you are acknowledging that some topics may be highly controversial in nature. While we make every attempt to ensure that no one and no groups are offended as a result of discussions contained within, we unfortunately can make no guarantees. Participate in threads contained within this forum at your own risk.

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Neo

Charlotte

16 posts in this topic


Great Pics! Thanks for the tour! :)

I'll be looking forward to the gigantic Chicago thread in May.

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Very nice photos. I had forgotten you had a camera. ;)

Where were you standing to get this one?

I was on top (10th floor) of 7th Street Station. I always park there because it's free on weekends and they give you 90 minutes free parking during the work week. Well, I was waiting on the sun to go down a bit more but I guess the security cameras got the best of me because a couple of minutes after that shot a security guard told me to stop taking pictures, and I of course wanted to obey his wishes. 8-)

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Does anyone know what the meaning behind the 4 statues are at Trade and Tryon other than its the center of the city?

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Very nice tour. Charlotte looks real modern, and is starting to have a dense urban feel as well. Man is it clean.

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Does anyone know what the meaning behind the 4 statues are at Trade and Tryon other than its the center of the city?

By Joe Perez at http://charlotte.citysearch.com

"The crossroads of Charlotte is best signified by the four statues at the intersection of Trade and Tryon Streets.

Where it All Began

Trade and Tryon represent more than just the center of the Queen City. This intersection has been in existence for hundreds of years. Native Americans passed through this crossroad on their voyages to the eastern coasts or western mountains.

Did You Know?

Trade and Tryon represents the literal center of Charlotte.

Body Language

Trade and Tryon's intersection has remained a sign of the times for Charlotte as far back as 1775, when the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence was supposedly signed."

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Cool shots, the water marks are rather distracting though.

I agree, but you've gotta save yourself somehow, lol! This is a business to and sometimes the images are used for that purpose so it takes on a new meaning when you do that.

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Some of the nicest photos that I have ever seen of uptown Charlotte.

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I'm not sure if that article outright told the meanings of the statues. The mother and child = the future, The Gold Panner = Commerce, The Railroad Worker = Industry, and sadly I have forgotten what the fourth represents but it is written on the base of each statue.

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I'm not sure if that article outright told the meanings of the statues.  The mother and child = the future, The Gold Panner = Commerce, The Railroad Worker = Industry, and sadly I have forgotten what the fourth represents but it is written on the base of each statue.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Sculptures on the Square

by Raymond Kaskey

Standing on each corner of Trade and Tryon are four giant sculptures by Washington artist Raymond Kaskey. The statues are titled "Transportation," "Future," "Commerce," and "Industry." Transportation is represented by a railroad worker holding a hammer in his hand. The figure of a woman holding a child represents the Future of the city. Commerce is symbolized by a gold miner spilling money on the head of a banker. The face of the banker is modeled after Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan. Industry is represented by a woman in a bonnet, symbolizing the mills and early industry of the area. The child peeking from her skirt suggests past child labor.

I got this from a walking tour of public art in Charlotte:

http://www.charlottecentercity.org/nav800....bcat=8&subsub=2

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