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Ellen

Lamps on Gervais Bridge

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I have learned that the bridge lamps were produced by Gibbes Machinery of Columbia. They were located at Blossom and Assembly, where USC's student gym now sits.

I'd love to know who designed the fixtures. They are beautiful!

A fellow at the antique mall corner of Huger and Blossom told me about a designer who had worked with Tiffany's. The mall has many yard ornaments attributed to this artist. Lore has it that the same designer, who had relocated to Columbia, produced the bridge lamps.

Anybody out there have information? Thanks in advance. Ellen

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I have learned that the bridge lamps were produced by Gibbes Machinery of Columbia. They were located at Blossom and Assembly, where USC's student gym now sits.

I'd love to know who designed the fixtures. They are beautiful!

A fellow at the antique mall corner of Huger and Blossom told me about a designer who had worked with Tiffany's. The mall has many yard ornaments attributed to this artist. Lore has it that the same designer, who had relocated to Columbia, produced the bridge lamps.

Anybody out there have information? Thanks in advance. Ellen

Ellen, according to The State, they were designed by the U.S. Treasury. That's all their article about the re-lighting said concerning the designer. I found this intriguing . . the Treasury? But your info on a local who worked for Tiffany's sounds equally intriguing . . . although if an antique dealer claims ANYthing is related to Tiffany (either generation) I would be VERY skeptical.

Let us know what you find out, though--fascinating! They are quite gorgeous.

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The US Treasury. Things that make you go Hmmm...

Now I'm smitten with the idea of finding out more. Guess tonight I'll be at the library.

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The US Treasury. Things that make you go Hmmm...

Now I'm smitten with the idea of finding out more. Guess tonight I'll be at the library.

I think I found something online; it doesn't say who designed the lamps, though.

Three hundred and three photograhs, 1911-1971, relating to the Gibbes Machinery Company of Columbia. Alexander Mason Gibbes bought out his father in the W.H. Gibbes & Company in 1902 and created the Gibbes Machinery Company. This company, with a foundry on Gervais Street and automotive services on Assembly Street, operated until 1987. In 1955 the company became a Volkswagon dealership in addition to maintaining the rest of its productions. The bulk of the photographs date from 1940 to 1971 and show casting day at the foundry on the corner of Wheat and Park Streets, the automotive service department and paint and body shop, the machine shop and its products including the Gibbes table, the trailer shop for construction and repair of heavy vehicles and trailers, street level and aerial views of the complex on the corner of Assembly and Blossom Streets, company dinners, and staff. Early photographs of interest include an interior of the company office with Singer sewing machines around 1905, interior views of the company works on Gervais Street in 1911, the 1912 fire which destroyed the company building on Gervais Street, a Model A Maxwell climbing the State House steps in 1910, Caughman's Auto Transfer, and Gen. Mark Clark receiving a new car in 1959. The foundry operated from 1912 to 1957 and made lamps for the Gervais Street bridge in 1927.

Bridge info

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Thank you Matt, yes. That's what I had found on-line. I guess I should search the Gibbes info further, as well as going back to the antique mall for the artist's name.

I love this kind of stuff. Designers so rarely get credit; as an artist I'm intrigued.

Also, I have a goal of producing a tile mosaic to hang near my front door. The bridge would be a super image.

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I like driving across that bridge

Like driving across is??? I think it's scary driving across it. The lanes are SOOOO narrow, you feel like you're about 3 inches from cars around you.

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But, the bridge itself is just amazing at night when driving across it. If you don't like the other cars, take an adventure at like 9:30 or 10pm and theres hardly another car on it during the week. (or at least that the way it is when I come home from work)

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