Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

wboarder44

Icon Sales

32 posts in this topic

Not sure if anybody knew this, but Bristol sold over 180 of the Icon units in a day in a half. They went on sale for friends and family on Wednesday of last week and to some relators and their clients on Thursday. I had an appointment with them on 9 am on Friday (I'm in the real estate industry and got hooked up. I have a relator friend that works for Fredrich and Clark and he didn't have an appointment until Sat.) and they only had like 25 units left, which were the "picked" over ones. Needless to say, there is either a HUGE demand out there, or a lot of speculation going on. My opinion is the later. Needless to say, I didn't get one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Thanks for the update. Terrazo better get into the game soon, I wonder what they are waiting for?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the update. Terrazo better get into the game soon, I wonder what they are waiting for?

The embarrassment to pass? Just kidding. Are they doing a redesign or reconceptualization of some kind? That little submarket is changing FAST.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's going to be a nice building. I'm a little surprised at how traditional the floorplans are. I thought they would be more open.

I was listening to a show on WPLN a couple of weeks ago that had an interior designer on ( I didn't catch the whole thing so I don't know who she was specifically) talking about homes and how the concepts of home evolves and stuff, typical NPR stuff. Anyway she mentioned how the traditional loft space with very open spaces and undefined rooms is being rethought as people realize they don't have any privacy and/or prefer actual rooms with predetermined functions. Just thought I'd throw that out there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know about this. Affordability is going out the window if some aren't allowed to rent in the Gulch. I know the almighty dollar is the reason for the rethink, but I hope the developers aren't just making these units available for Remax agents. Whereas they would actually have a WARM BODY(s) in them if they styed rentable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


wow - quick sell out. My only concern is that now they are offering the rest of the building as condos instead of having some rental units. The gulch (and most of downtown) seems to be catering exclusively to people of a certain income and above. Seems a little scary to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wow - quick sell out. My only concern is that now they are offering the rest of the building as condos instead of having some rental units. The gulch (and most of downtown) seems to be catering exclusively to people of a certain income and above. Seems a little scary to me.

On the other hand, what were the rents going to be versus the amount that a typical mortgage payment plus assessment? As in a lot of highrises, many people will own units that they rent out, so there still may be rental units available in the building, just through individual owners as opposed as through a management company. It may be hard to tell what the effect on pricing will be for a while.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good point bwithers, I agree that many inverstor/owners will just rent out the units as they reap the appreciation windfall.

FYI

The Signature meet and greet set for the 29th should prove interesting. I have no first hand information but I would speculate that if the contract buy in is like Viridian then 20K will get you a contract to sit on for 3 years. The appreciation will be significant (my opinion).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was listening to a show on WPLN a couple of weeks ago that had an interior designer on ( I didn't catch the whole thing so I don't know who she was specifically) talking about homes and how the concepts of home evolves and stuff, typical NPR stuff. Anyway she mentioned how the traditional loft space with very open spaces and undefined rooms is being rethought as people realize they don't have any privacy and/or prefer actual rooms with predetermined functions. Just thought I'd throw that out there.

Good point. We like our open floor plan, but I can see how it would not work for everyone, especially families with kids.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can see both sides. I do not know if we have a 'true' loft floorplan but everything except the bedrooms and bathrooms are open (Kitchen/Dining Room/Entry/Living Room/Media Room). It works great for our family of 4. We can all be in the same space but doing four different tasks. Let's see if we still like it when they are teenagers :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't say I'm shocked at the fast sales. This project is both sited and designed in a way that says "sexy" all over the place. If I had to buy a highrise unit, I would probably shoot for the Icon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope they keep the rentals in. They are needed in the downtown and many are going the way of condos. I was hoping this project would be different. Money talks. Maybe they will build a comparable apartment building in the Gulch. We have not seen the last of the development announcements down there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Just got off the phone with one of the Icon people. She was just making her appointments to sell the remaining units. They are anticipating selling out the remaing units rather quickly as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't say I'm shocked at the fast sales. This project is both sited and designed in a way that says "sexy" all over the place. If I had to buy a highrise unit, I would probably shoot for the Icon.

OK, I gotta admit, I'm curious here. I like the Icon as well. It is a sexy, modern building. As much as you rage against modernism, I'm curious why you like the Icon, but not the Terrazzo. Is it the art deco feel of the Icon? Is that even a correct classification of the building? I like the Icon better than the Terrazzo also, but I still lack the correct lexicon to say exactly why. It just seems to be more correctly rendered.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, I gotta admit, I'm curious here. I like the Icon as well. It is a sexy, modern building. As much as you rage against modernism, I'm curious why you like the Icon, but not the Terrazzo. Is it the art deco feel of the Icon? Is that even a correct classification of the building? I like the Icon better than the Terrazzo also, but I still lack the correct lexicon to say exactly why. It just seems to be more correctly rendered.

The words "Modernist" and "modern" do not mean the same thing, first of all. "Modernism" is a historicist architecture produced in the 20th Century which is focused on Pure Form, a complete abandoning of all embellishment and ornament, and an aesthetic which is committed to technology above all else. It is almost always anti-urban, and depended from its outset on a future utopia that never arrived. Look up Oscar Neimeyer, Le Corbusier, Walter Gropius, and Mies van der Rohe. Although, bear in mind: Mies was different. He was not so interested in all that utopia stuff Gropius was always going on about--he mostly just liked to have sex with people impressed by his avant gardism.

That "art deco" feel you prescribe to the Icon (and justifiably so) is the same "art deco" feel which accompanies the Viridian and will truly flower on the Signature. It represents a compromise between the classical and the machine aesthetic. Ironically, as originally conceived in first half of the 20th Century, Art Deco was a step AWAY from the classical and (to be a little liberal with my historical dot-connecting) TOWARDS the modernist. Now it appears we are revisiting the same territory, only moving in reverse, back to the classical from the futuristic fantasies of the city-killers.

All the better. Taking the lead on a dead-end track makes you last in the race to get back. The Terazzo is a complete failure on all levels but two or three: it has an articulated corner, it has a transparent ground floor, and an comprehensible entrance. The rest is a masturbatory attempt at vainglorious "Modernist Revivalism," and I hate it. It is historicism at its most adolescent and annoying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am looking forward to the final rendering of the Signature Tower. I did like the original design so it will be interesting to hear you detail the improvements. Will you be in town for the 29th reception? Do you know if that is the date the new rendering will be available for public viewing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The words "Modernist" and "modern" do not mean the same thing, first of all. "Modernism" is a historicist architecture produced in the 20th Century which is focused on Pure Form, a complete abandoning of all embellishment and ornament, and an aesthetic which is committed to technology above all else. It is almost always anti-urban, and depended from its outset on a future utopia that never arrived. Look up Oscar Neimeyer, Le Corbusier, Walter Gropius, and Mies van der Rohe. Although, bear in mind: Mies was different. He was not so interested in all that utopia stuff Gropius was always going on about--he mostly just liked to have sex with people impressed by his avant gardism.

That "art deco" feel you prescribe to the Icon (and justifiably so) is the same "art deco" feel which accompanies the Viridian and will truly flower on the Signature. It represents a compromise between the classical and the machine aesthetic. Ironically, as originally conceived in first half of the 20th Century, Art Deco was a step AWAY from the classical and (to be a little liberal with my historical dot-connecting) TOWARDS the modernist. Now it appears we are revisiting the same territory, only moving in reverse, back to the classical from the futuristic fantasies of the city-killers.

All the better. Taking the lead on a dead-end track makes you last in the race to get back. The Terazzo is a complete failure on all levels but two or three: it has an articulated corner, it has a transparent ground floor, and an comprehensible entrance. The rest is a masturbatory attempt at vainglorious "Modernist Revivalism," and I hate it. It is historicism at its most adolescent and annoying.

Interesting. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The words "Modernist" and "modern" do not mean the same thing, first of all. "Modernism" is a historicist architecture produced in the 20th Century which is focused on Pure Form, a complete abandoning of all embellishment and ornament, and an aesthetic which is committed to technology above all else. It is almost always anti-urban, and depended from its outset on a future utopia that never arrived. Look up Oscar Neimeyer, Le Corbusier, Walter Gropius, and Mies van der Rohe. Although, bear in mind: Mies was different. He was not so interested in all that utopia stuff Gropius was always going on about--he mostly just liked to have sex with people impressed by his avant gardism.

That "art deco" feel you prescribe to the Icon (and justifiably so) is the same "art deco" feel which accompanies the Viridian and will truly flower on the Signature. It represents a compromise between the classical and the machine aesthetic. Ironically, as originally conceived in first half of the 20th Century, Art Deco was a step AWAY from the classical and (to be a little liberal with my historical dot-connecting) TOWARDS the modernist. Now it appears we are revisiting the same territory, only moving in reverse, back to the classical from the futuristic fantasies of the city-killers.

All the better. Taking the lead on a dead-end track makes you last in the race to get back. The Terazzo is a complete failure on all levels but two or three: it has an articulated corner, it has a transparent ground floor, and an comprehensible entrance. The rest is a masturbatory attempt at vainglorious "Modernist Revivalism," and I hate it. It is historicism at its most adolescent and annoying.

Curious, NewTowner, what did you think of Tom Wolfe's "From Bauhaus to Our House"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ha ha ha - I just read that article. So I think this means we'll see some more development in the Gulch. Now.... if we could just get Crate and Barrel to open down there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bristol has got to be thinking to themselves that they need to start developing a new building in the area...after three enormous successess (With the ICON on top), it would be stupid for them to take a break.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.