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In 25 years, which city's skyline do you think your's will resemble?


krazeeboi

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It's kinda hard to say. I know that Atlanta is throwing up towers left and right, but will they fill in the gaps between downtown, Midtown, and Buckhead, or will they just add more density to those existing clusters? If the former, then perhaps we'll see Atlanta come to resemble Chicago in a way. If the latter, then just a bigger version of what it already is.

Downtown Atlanta and Midtown will connect for sure. The outlying clusters will get bigger. Probably a lot like Chicago.

Houston will be about like Chicago.

The big surprise will be Las Vegas, Nashville, and Orlando. Nashville will be like Atlanta now but with more density in the core, Las Vegas will be spread all over the place with little density, Orlando will rival Miami.

Louisville will fade away to the lingering echo of laughter at Museum Plaza. :rofl: On the other hand, if Museum Plaza doesn't get built or gets redesigned, then they will be about like Charlotte now.

Charlotte will finally get their dream, to be like Atlanta. Just kidding guys. I know that strikes a nerve with Charlotte people, heh heh.

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I feel Miami will look closer to Chicago (now).

Houston will just be bigger.

Atlanta will have one complete skyline.

Charlotte will look more dense.

Nashville will look like Charlotte (now).

New Orleans will look a smaller Tampa.

Columbia will look similiar to late 1970's Atlanta.

Birmingham will look like Charlotte.

Fayetteville will look Memphis without the pyramid.

Greensboro will look like Birmingham.

Wilmington will look like Bridgeport, CT.

Winston-Salem will look like Louisville.

Greenville will look like Austin.

Southport, NC will look like Palm Beach.

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Nashville will look like Charlotte (now).

New Orleans will look a smaller Tampa.

BIG LOL!!

Sorry dude but Nashville ALREADY looks like CHarlotte minus the BOA. Get off your high horse, Charlotte's skyline would be mediocre without BOA. It would be no better than Nashville, Tampa, Jax, Etc.

New Orleans already has more density.

Those are obvious digs at the two cities in a ridiculous attempt at making yourself believe Charlotte is way bigger.

But thanks for the laugh. :thumbsup:

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Oh wow, I missed that "New Orleans looking like a smaller Tampa" one. New Orleans' skyline is already better than Tampa's IMO.

Fayetteville looking like Memphis in 25 years is....interesting. Considering that Fayetteville doesn't really have a "skyline" as of yet, I think Greensboro would be a little more appropriate comparison. Or if you're feeling a bit more ambitious, Winston-Salem. But Memphis? Nah.

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BIG LOL!!

Sorry dude but Nashville ALREADY looks like CHarlotte minus the BOA. Get off your high horse, Charlotte's skyline would be mediocre without BOA. It would be no better than Nashville, Tampa, Jax, Etc.

New Orleans already has more density.

Those are obvious digs at the two cities in a ridiculous attempt at making yourself believe Charlotte is way bigger.

But thanks for the laugh. :thumbsup:

What's with the animosity towards Charlotte? Just wondering

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I'm referring to Norfolk in the present time.

Charleston

Charleston_CP_image01.jpg

Norfolk Currently

Picture003.jpg

Norfolk within 3-4 years

All the buildings in the picture below are either under construction or start construction this year

Norfolk5.JPG

A: Granby Tower

B: Trader Tower

C: Hilton Tower

D: Harbor Heights

E: Brambleton Tower

F: Hoffler Tower

G: HRT Headquaters Tower

I really like Charleston and actually lived there for a little over a year. They have a very dense, walkable, and historic downtown but honestly, Norfolk just feels bigger. I can definately see Charleston looking more like Norfolk in a few years, not even 25 years at that I'm talking more like 5-10. I can't agree that Charleston looks anything like Norfolk now however.

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In 25 years, I don't see Huntsville's skyline looking like another city's skyline. However, I do see it getting a lot denser and taller, looking more like a traditional skyline. Huntsville will get a few 25-30 story skyscrapers and a lot of <20 high-rises in both downtown and Research Park.

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New Orleans will look a smaller Tampa.

Tampa has a nice skyline, but IMO New Orleans is already ahead of it in that category, especially in density.

Tampa(I know these aren't very good photos, but I tried to find some of the better ones)

tampa.jpg

tampa.jpg

tampas102web.jpg

New Orleans

NewOrleansSkyline_4.jpg

NewOrleansCBDfromUptown.jpg

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And that's my #1 complaint for the Tampa skyline: relatively little density in spite of good height. I'd rather a dense skyline with not much height than vice versa. But I do like the towers in place now. Some mid-rises/low high-rises would do wonders for Tampa's skyline.

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I think New Orleans now looks like Houston in 1972.

Maybe New Orleans will get more dense and look similar to Houston now. (Downtown anyways)

New Orleans and Houston looked very similar during the early 70's. The then tallest building in Houston, One Shell Plaza, is nearly identical to One Shell Square in New Orleans. Since then, both cities have greatly improved their skylines, but Houston added more and much taller buildings. And this is why One Shell Plaza was passed up as Houston's tallest decades ago, and One Shell Square is still the tallest in New Orleans.

And right now, the New Orleans skyline is already pretty dense,IMO. There are nearly no street level parking lots in downtown NOLA, mostly just low and mid-rise buildings. What the skyline needs is more height, which it will get over time, and getting a new tallest in Trump Tower will definately help. :D But if New Orleans has the height of Houston one day, that would definately be fantastic.

Trump International Hotel and Tower New Orleans-67 story's

trumpinternationaltower7uf.jpg

Sorry, I didn't mean to turn this into a New Orleans thread! ;)

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It is difficult to think about Charleston's skyline, because the city doesn't really have one now (unless you count the pictures of some old houses with the Ravenel Bridge in the background). The MUSC "skyline" is certainly noticeable, but there are only a few other tall buildings on the peninsula (Sergeant Jasper apartments, Francis Marion hotel, and Dockside condominiums come to mind). These are scattered around, and the tallest is 18 floors. I know that Charleston has a height restriction, so until that is eliminated I don't think we will see any sort of skyline for Charleston. And honestly, with Charleston's old and historical feel, perhaps a dominant skyline wouldn't be a good fit anyway.

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What's with the animosity towards Charlotte? Just wondering

I have none. But some Charlotte posters tend to artificially give Charlotte a boost when being compared to other cities but they especially tend to dig at Nashville. Like the above post comment about N'ville looking like Charlotte in 25 years. It's a pure joke. Because some Charlotte posters link their self worth as a large scale city on buildings, particularly BOA, then they try to boost themselves by putting down other skylines who don't have that one high building. The ego and overstatements about their city is so obvious it is funny. :rolleyes:

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Nashville's skyline is certainly comparable to Charlotte's, more or less. But I know with the momentum that Nashville has had lately, its skyline will be well beyond Charlotte's present-day skyline. I do agree, it is a bit of a joke to say that Nashville's will look like present-day Charlotte's in 25 years.

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Mmmm..I don't know about Columbia...Do ya'll know cities bigger than Columbia with alot of density but really no height beside DC? I know Columbia's will continue to grow but I don't know if the height we want will come

I wouldn't worry about Columbia. I've been downtown many times walking and it is one of the most pedestrian friendly cities I've been to. he last time I went, it was so clean it was startling. And that library downtown is awesome. And when you are standing beneath a 300 foot tower or a 600 foot tower, it doesn't matter, both are impressive when standing right under them.

Enjoy what you have and the rest will come. :)

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I have none. But some Charlotte posters tend to artificially give Charlotte a boost when being compared to other cities but they especially tend to dig at Nashville. Like the above post comment about N'ville looking like Charlotte in 25 years. It's a pure joke. Because some Charlotte posters link their self worth as a large scale city on buildings, particularly BOA, then they try to boost themselves by putting down other skylines who don't have that one high building. The ego and overstatements about their city is so obvious it is funny. :rolleyes:

I don't think the person who mad that comparison was from Charlotte but Fayetteville (Caper Fear River), I think you continue to make to much of this - relax, relate, release.....go for a walk or something, but please calm down. You have many uninformed posters from all cities, that's why most informed posters just blow it off.

And please refrain from saying things like if you take away BOA bldg. etc., it reallys sounds juvenile.

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I agree more with the Nashville's skyline being similar to Atlanta's in 25 years. A lot of comparisons have been made in the past to Nashville's development mirroring that of Atlanta's in the 1970's-1980's. 25 years is a long time for things to happen...while we may not ever be as big as Atlanta currently is, I am fairly sure we will boast an impressive skyline in a quarter of a century. There is already a proposal for a 1,000+ footer in Nashville as well as rumors of hotels topping out at over 500 feet in the works.

Nashville, Charlotte, and Jacksonville (and a few others possibly) will join the likes of Atlanta, Houston, and Dallas and separate themselves from the rest of the southern cities when it comes to boasting impressive skylines in the next 25 years.

P.S. - if our skyline looks like present day Charlotte's in 25 years, we would have to completely stop growing.

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Wow, the New Orleans-Houston one looks most convincing.

In 25 years, Birmingham's skyline will probably look just like it does now.

They haven't added anything over 15 stories since the 1980s, and to my knowledge,

don't have any in the works.

Tuscaloosa doesn't have a skyline & because of its layout is unlikely to get one

(although we'll be adding some nice few-story, mixed-use deals that should improve downtown's

functionality and appearance significantly).

Of Alabama cities, Mobile's skyline might be the one to watch, if the current RSA tower leads

downtown Mobile into a "condo boom." The Eastern Shore suburbs are just starting to approve high-rises, too. 25 years is probably too soon for a "mini-Tampa Bay," though.

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