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it's just dave

So, what's so great about Nashville?

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Someone on SSP asked this question, and in my morning coffee-induced fog, I answered. I'm sure I left some things out, but enjoyed answering the question. Skyscrapergeek offered some really nice comments about it and suggested we have an opportunity to express just why we like it here. In all fairness, I guess if someone wants to say why they don't, that's cool too. SG asked that I post what I wrote here and I will.

So, why do you like it here? What's so special about it? Here's my thoughts.

From my SSP post:

"I've lived in Nashville almost all my life which gives me over 50 years experience and I still find it somewhat difficult to express my love affair for this city. I've been intimate with the city on a level usually reserved for those of us who share this love of our environments no matter where we live. We explore, we look, we see things others may not. I appreciate the grit and the humbling and extraordianary people watching this city offers. The tourist industry is an amazing thing to witness with people from all over the world walking the streets and seeming to have a great time no matter what they've chosen to do. The creative class in Nashville is enormous and probably the most difficult to describe. The music industry with the most famous brand of course being country is constantly expanding to include all genres of music. Hip-hop, pop, classical, jazz, rock, alternative, techie and other recordings are going on in the city all the time with some of the biggest and best known in the business working and playing in town. Having a world famous brand, Country, is priceless. It's not the same ol' barn.

Being a huge college town fills the bars, coffeeshops, streets, parks with young energetic people who add such a nice air of modernity to the place. The immense level of wealth in the community gives us an interesting mix of fine stores (many of the high end of privately owned boutique styles) and beautiful neighborhoods.

There's an energy here that's hard to describe, from the rapidly gentrifying and changing inner ring neighborhoods to the burgeoning downtown core.

Nashville just feels good. It's a place that now, on nearly every corner, change is afoot. Where it's the world class symphony center, the dramatic upgrade of public spaces, extreme pro-business attitudes, the new found prospect of being able to watch multiple large towers grow (including our 1000+ footer) among a serious attempt to redefine parts of town recently ignored, but now the target of modern, walkable, and usable 21st century urban hoods, pro sports, extensive park system, a diverse population and an acceptance of that diversity, the funk of living in a music community. It's really tough to explain.

And then, in 15 minutes, you can be in the woods, by a waterfall walking the trails and finding yourself a million miles from the world if that's what you want.

I've been to lots of places, and I've never felt the same anywhere else.

To me, Nashville is and always will be a beautiful state of mind. There will always be those folks who think we're nothing but hay bales and hee-haw. To them, I'd only say, "please, keep thinking that." There are other places for you. To those who want a unique experience living in one of America's greatest, most prosperous and interesting cities that's still a manageable size, give us a shot. If you want to watch a city being built to entirely new level right before your very eyes, now is the time to come."

We look forward to your perspectives.

Dave

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Now, if we only had a viable two-party system in this burg, things would be perfect. -_-

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I have lived or visited all over the US. Atlanta, Houston, Galveston, Montgomery, Charleston, Mobile, Huntsville, are among many of the places I have lived. I am not going to knock any of those places either. I traveled for a hotel company and spent time in the Marines and visited many cities. But Nashville is home now. I am originally form East Tennessee and have never found a place so inviting and the people so friendly as Nashville. Nashville has been in the top five friendliest cities in the U.S. for a number of years.

Nashville is centrally located and easy to travel to and from as far as the Interstates and Airlines go. There is a synergy here that I cannot explain but I do know this, I cant imagine myself living anywhere else.

There are plenty of lakes, State Parks, Mountains to the East, Rolling Hills here, and the Delta to the West. Its in the middle of a great State where the people have always been easy going and level headed.

Nashville has been in the top five friendliest cities in the U.S. for a number of years.

The cost of living is relatively cheap and there are plenty of jobs. The economy is diverse and we have all four seasons. The amazing thing is that it has a small town attitude with the big city conveniences.

I guess I could go on for a while but I guess its a start.

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Excellent. Thanks for starting this thread Dave.

Well, I will have to admit that this will be very biased as I am a native villian. Born at Baptist Hospital even. It all began on a wintry February morning... :blink: ...sorry. I don't think I could say it any better than Dave but I will say that there is something amazingly unique about the glue that holds Nashville together. I have traveled a great deal as many on this forum have and I have yet to find another city like it. I have some definite favorites across the country such as Phoenix, Washington D.C., Philadelphia, Lincoln, NE (yes Lincoln, Go Huskers!) and many others but nothing as comfortable as Nashville. In a strange way it is almost like a smaller version of the melting pot that is the United States. There are so many people coming in from all over the country and when they get here they find their own space and add to the mix. (A little studio lingo there) Compared to many other cities, there is so little social turmoil it is easy to forget how well this city gets along.

I will admit that in my twenties Atlanta almost drew me away but I've been blessed having stayed. I am so excited to witness a huge new chapter in the development of our city it almost makes me want to :cry: . Cue the :sick: .

We don't have it all but we have a lot of what I love in a city.

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Wow! Great posts. I've only lived here a short while... and basically chose Nashville fairly randomly lol. But every time I read stuff like this... it gives like, goosebumps or somethin heh... and makes me think I couldn't have chosen a better place! It seems the people who have lived here a while (other than those who are bitter towards the country music stereotype), are quite proud of their city... just as much as people are proud to live in NYC, Chicago, and any other great city :thumbsup:

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Sometimes you appreciate something more after you don't have it anymore. When I lived in Nashville, I loved it for the people and the river. If I lived there now, I'd probably say the same thing fourteen years later. Wow! Has it been that long?

The People: (IMO of course) As a general rule, Nashvillians are genuine. There doesn't seem to be as many blowhards as you find in other places. It's a big and growing city, but the people are still quite polite. At the same time, it's a home of hard-working entrepreneurs.

As you have mentioned, it's a tolerant place. That is not an imaginary thing. Atlanta used to call itself the city too busy to hate, but in recent years, relations here have deteriorated to an abysmal level. I hope Nashville learns from Atlanta's lessons.

The River: What more can I say except "Wake up, Nashville!!!!" I do, however, like the plans I've seen for the DT side including the BP and RMH among so much else. I hope you guys get the new CC, but I hope it goes in the gulch. Don't ruin a burgeoning 24/7 neighborhood with a big box.

Keep up the good work, guys.

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Jice hit nail on the head when mentioning pride. Nashville is full of it. I had the chance to drive a group of high school kids (from the counties) through town last weekend. When we hit the inner loop of 40/65 in downtown they all just kind of got quiet and looked the skyline over in aww. The words out of their mouths were "I just love Nashville." That says a lot to me. As long as the city can keep that ever-changing mystique which lures the youthful - things will be fine. Having said that I think I can honestly make the statement that Nashville has a good habit of passing the city on to new generations.

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Having said that I think I can honestly make the statement that Nashville has a good habit of passing the city on to new generations.

Very interesting point memphian. I'm really amazed at the young business people here. They are so positive and energetic that I feel really good about the future of Nashville's business community. That's part of the glue thing a was talking about.

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I thought about this thread as I walked through Centennial Park today. I had a lunch meeting at the HCA offices, and after it was over, i decided to walk back to my office at VUMC instead of riding with the other folks who drove.

First, I caught a glimpse of the Nashville skyline and was inspired by the sleek buildings and cranes. Then, I walked past the Parthenon - what a great structure! Then, I meandered around the little lake in the park. Folks were feeding ducks, rollerblading, walking, having lunch - even fishing.

What's so great about Nashville? It's a city on the rise with a palpable buzz of energy all around. All the visible activity reminded me of this (buildings, people, signs of progress). Yet, it's also peaceful, strong and calm. The Parthenon reminded me of this. It's kinda like "being cool" without saying you are....like the stigma of James Dean or Miles Davis. Okay, corny reference over.

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It's kinda like "being cool" without saying you are....

I love the comparison to the Parthenon and I especially love this line. Nice narrative too.

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Wonderful thread. I was born in Nashville, and Nashville will always be home to me. Unfortunately, a layoff forced to move to Chattanooga about 3 and 1/2 years ago. Is was blessed because Chattanooga is a damn nice town, and it's still close to Nashville! What a great city! Nashville has great people, real friendly...the type of people that will walk up as a stranger and say hello with a smile. Nashville is home to the greatest music scene in America, wonderful colleges, and great places for entertainment, be it arts, sports, recreation, lakes, restaurants, trendy spots...you name it. It's the most progressive city in Tennessee, and now the nation has discovered Music City. It is now the most favored city in America for business relocation. That really says a lot about its attractiveness to people outside our area. Downtown is extremely vibrant and getting better every day. There's a growing buzz all over America about Nashville. What potential this city has! It's so exciting to know Nashville and experience its growth and development! :thumbsup:

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Friends,

IJDave nailed it with his response, but I'll add a few quick "what I love about Nashville" points.

1. The people. They're coming from all over the world. And they love the place. I've met COUNTLESS newcomers who just gush about the city. How it has so many cool and fun big-city offerings while being "small town and manageable." I live on the east side and am now seeing more and more African Muslims, Hispanics and Asians. I lived next to Wiccans on my right and "old South old timers" across the street. Bohemians, hipsters, college kids, mainstreamers, middle-class blacks, poor whites, rich Indians, gays, hard-core religious fundamentalists, Californians, New Yorkers, Kurds, Somalians, etc. It is simply amazing. The city is developing an incredibly diverse population -- and people WANT to live here. People are so friendly and excited about all the changes. You can just see the positive vibe.

2. All the "new stuff." The Main Library, the Frist, the Zoo, the Schermerhorn. The Titans. The Preds. The funky bars and sophisticated restaurants. The fast-muliplying coffee shops. What seems like hundreds of new multi-unit residential buildings. It is simply mind-boggling all the great additions since the early 1990s.

3. The colleges and universities. There is likely no city in America with this population and with this many quality places of higher education. Vanderbilt is the anchor but TSU is quite something in its own right (the research being done there is impressive). Belmont, Aquinas, Fisk, Lipscomb and Trevecca. All four-year institutions. Meharry is historical. Watkins College of Art and Design is a rising power for art schools in the South. Nashville State now has about 7,000 students. What U.S. city in the 800,000 to 1.4 million pop range can match this? We are very lucky to have these schools.

4. The music. We've got jazz musicians, classical musicians, bluegrass players, crooners, pickers, singer-songwriters, a great underground hip-hop scene, the Fisk Jubilee Singers, Young Buck, Bela Fleck, the Kings of Leon, Chester Thompson, Jeff Coffin, Brazilbilly, Be Your Own Pet, Donna Summer, Rod McGaha, Webb Wilder, Annie Selleck, Beegie Adair, David Schnaufer, Edgar Meyer, the Barber Brothers. The Ryman. Exit/In. City Hall. And soon the 'Horn. Incredible.

I was born in Memphis (LOVE the Bluff City), lived three years in Chicago and spent two months doing an intership in New York City. I've been to at least 30 of America's 50 largest cities, driven the neighborhoods, drank at the coffee shops and bars, talked to the locals. I've seen lots of wonderful places. Portland is very cool. LOVE San Francisco. Providence is underrated. As is Dayton. My brother lived in Cincy. Fantastic town. Columbia, S.C. is a hidden jewel. St. Louis is a pround old lady. Pittsburgh remains a favorite. Boston is gorgeous. Ditto for San Diego. Seattle is in my Top 5. L.A. is insane. Milwaukee is cool in a blue-collar way. D.C. is so unusual. As are Savannah and Charleston. Atlanta is hot. Charlotte and Jacksonville are getting hot. Birmingham has Five Points. Louisville has Bardstown Highway. Dallas has Deep Ellum. Love em all. But I've got to say that our little old Nashville (as IJDave would say) is becoming a player. We are a city that has a can-do attitude. We are a city that is no longer very concerned if people still think of us as "Hee Haw Town." We are a city making things happen. We have a purpose. We have a vision. We are booming. We are The Ville. Friendly, appreciative of how far we've come. Welcoming to all.

Thanks, Dave, for starting this thread.

WW

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Most of you don't know heckles, and I'm sure he won't mind my putting his comments on here. I've copied them from SSP where his reputation of a Nashville detractor is well-known. Here's what he's been telling the world for a long time and it's, truthfully, how he sees us. Coins have two sides, if I'm him, I get the hell out. lol.

Enjoy. Brandon, if you're reading this, thought you might want to know your editorial is being published. So here ya go guys, SSP at its finest.

__________from heckles (he's about 24 or so, grew up outside Cookeville, nice enough young man, but has some issues with our town...and himself, and I'm not fighting it. He's so angry. He's lived here a couple of years, but didn't grow up here) But, for what it's worth, take a look at this. You might get a kick out of it._______

"Please remember that everyone has an opinion, regardless whether you disagree with mine is not the point.

With that said...

I have spent my 24 years living in Tennessee in some form or fashion, most of those years an hour outside downtown Nashville, some of those years in Memphis and in Nashville right outside downtown.

My opinion on living in Nashville is that the city has a particularly slow pace of life. Its a place people come to for lower costs of living, not high class lifestyles. Shopping is average, culture is a mixed bag, and its a place where people either love or hate.

Nashville is the bona fide country music capital of the world, and its silly to ignore this fact. Its an identity some in the city want to ignore, and others embrace fanatically. The downtown area is hopping with cowboy hats, tourists, and a "club row" with a mix between twang, hip hop, and top 40 pop. The city has a budding electronic scene, nothing major, but dooable for the occasional club types. The gay life is very small, but the community is tight knit (even if its centered around internet chat rooms). LOL

Nashville is the city of religion and conservative politics (the city proper has a few liberal communities, but even the Democrats in greater Nashville tend to be conservative in many respects, the Republicans are beyond conservative and are often radical right wing extremists). The Southern Baptist Convention calls Nashville home, the Church of Christ ranks high among its membership in the city, and Methodists, Presbyterians, as well as other more moderate congregations have their voices as well. There are more churches on the streets of Nashville than most any city in the south and nation at large. Simply put: Nashville is a very traditional city by majority. It has budding alternative lifestyles, as any growing metropolitan area in the 1-2 million range will, but these voices will likely never have a majority voice in anything.

As a member of the "alternative" culture scene, I feel a bit overwhelmed. I believe in science before religion, I believe in good government and fair taxes while everyone else seems to believe in no government and no taxes (except where they see fit, such as the military and religious controls over personal behavior). I'm gay, and I don't feel any respect from the greater community at large. We have a tight knit community, and there is a growing respect, but its behind the national average. Every city has room to build on, but Nashville is always going to be decades behind New York, Chicago, San Fran, or anywhere else that is truly progressive. But again, Nashville has a love it or hate it attitude. Those who live here usually choose to live here, thus they love it. So you won't find many Nashvillians who live here, even gay ones, who hate it. They live here for a reason.

Growing up here, and experiencing what other places have to offer, I feel disenchanted. What furthers my feelings is that I'm a very urbanist at heart. This gets to my next set of feelings on what its like to live here.

Nashville is about as non-urban as you can get. Its similar to Charlotte, only slightly more urban. Urban neighborhoods like East Nashville are fairly suburban, still "coming back" with a lot of poverty and crime surrounding the immediate areas. There are other cute neighborhoods south and west of downtown. In particular, you may find the south 12th, Belmont, Hillsboro Village areas quite interesting as an out-of-towner to visit. These areas are close to urban neighborhoods, but they don't quite replicate a true urban village. Compared with a European city of 100,000, Nashville actually has less to offer in terms of urban street landscape. This is something that I realize many of you on here may not agree with, but its large in part of how people define urban.

Nashville's premiere "urban" area is the immediate downtown area and the adjacent midtown and West End areas. West End is quasi-suburban/urban mix. The main street of West End Avenue has a suburban-esque urban feel, or vice versa. Its not an urban district you'd find in any number of major cities of the world. To the locals, though, its a very urban area. Again, its up to interpretation.

Nashville has a real problem with wealth divisions. The city is extremely poor in many areas just outside downtown. Its amazing to see how poor it goes from the corner of division and 12th where the downtown begins and out towards Murfreesboro corridor, or Nolensville corridor, or the Charlotte corridor going westward. North up 8th there is a hodgepodge of housing projects, new urban condos, and vacant warehouse areas. This mix-and-match of neighborhoods is really inconsistent, and a lot of cities have issues with this. Its not only a Nashville thing. Nashville does have an above-average amount of disorganization and inconsistent feel to it. The incohesive nature makes it very unattractive in my opinion. Its not diversity as much as is chaos.

The metropolitan area is too large to stereotype as one individual group, but generalities still exist even with the diversity. Nashville is a very conservative metropolitan area. This cannot be stressed enough. Nashville is one of the most suburban metropolitan areas in the nation. This cannot be stressed enough. Nashville has a very divided culture, a minority progressive culture in select urban neighborhoods, and then an overwhelming traditional culture outside this core. Within the core, you can be overwhelmed with tradition when the suburban population spills in for the daily routine. Add in the mid state commuters, and you have a city that is culturally incompatible for my personal tastes. The small progressive, urban center just isn't enough to statisfy a true urbanite progressive. Its cute, but no cigar.

Nashville is a small Atlanta. Its building skyscrapers before its building a city. The city that is being built is so suburban that you cannot replace it with urbanism for many generations.

But if you are looking for a slow paced, cheap, traditional mid sized city that is convenient, its a city you could live in. My progressive friends who happily live here are able to block out their surroundings far better than I ever could. I compare the cheap arguments to Mexico. Mexico has radically lower taxes in general than here, its got cheaper land, and its "cheap" but I don't quite think the quality of life is high. Nashville is a city I see in quite the same light.

Jobs? The jobs issue is a joke in my opinion. If you don't work for one of the few major employers, the job market in Nashville is actually below average, even for the southern region. An overwhelming majority of jobs growth in Nashville from 1980 to the 2000's has not been flashy jobs. A majority have been warehousing in LaVergne, call center jobs in places like Dell, Verizon, T-Mobile, Sprint (which has since closed), and etc. Nashville is big on trucking and warehousing by any measure. Nashville is more of a caterpillar and trucking boomtown as much as it is Nissan and HCA boomtown. Again, its average growth, and the wages here are highly average. It doesn't match the cost of living and wages of other areas. Is the job market better than Pittsburgh? Absolutely. But then again, that is because Pittsburgh has traditionally been one of the worst markets in the nation. Outside that the jobs argument is mostly fluff designed for marketing and urban-marketing magazines.

As far as visiting, I think Nashville is a perfectly fine city to visit. Its got a lot of great historical sites. From Civil War sites to the photogenic hills, there is a lot to do in one day. But don't expect there to be much for day two, three, or four unless you are into the country scene. Everything else can be had elsewhere, generally with a better flavor.

My personal opinion? I grew up here, didn't have a choice in the matter, and I've been trying to find a way out for years. I've given this place many chances. I grew up thinking this place was great. We're all told how lucky we are to grow up in a place like Nashville. I guess I feel a little betrayed because I can't stand the place now. I made the horrible unfortunate mistake of moving to the city of Nashville in 2004 thinking I'd "work my way out" to another city. It set me back financially and I'm just now getting on solid enough financial ground to move this summer, in 2006.

I'm gracious that I'll finally get my chance to make a real move this year, and I regret ever living in Nashville. Growing up here has already left its impression on me, and its not a positive one. Its a view I'll keep for the rest of my life.

That's my opinion. Nothing more, nothing less."

That's our heckles.

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I think Heckles and Fieldmarshaldj would get along together famously, don't you? Just kidding! :lol:

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There are some people who see the glass as half-full; there are other people who see the glass as having tricked them into becoming a victim and somehow thinking their alternative world could bud better but instead the glass is as non-urban as you can get with way too many churches and conservatism spreading like a virus in the glass yet somehow the glass is getting glassier while the poor are getting poorier, turning some people into a heckling victim.

<<Tistic initiated radio edit... :blush: ...Tistic taking time out for sensitivity training>>

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heckles (he's about 24 or so, grew up outside Cookeville

That's next to Berkeley, right ? :blink:

I think Heckles and Fieldmarshaldj would get along together famously, don't you? Just kidding! :lol:

I'm going to my happy place now. :wacko:

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Like most folks, I can't help but disagree with Heckles on several points! I live in La Vergne, of everyone I know in the Nashville MSA, I can only count on one hand those who are in the trucking, warehouse, or call center business. Most are involved in Healthcare, Insurance, or finance. And of those who are involved with the "crappy" call center jobs, they're making a nice $10 - $15 an hour!

I'm from Atlanta, and will always love that place because all my family is there, it is my home, and becuase GEORGIA TECH FOOTBALL RULES!!! That said, I'm proud to call this rocky top state my home.

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As you can see by my UrbanPlanet name I am from Lawrenceburg, Tn, so no I do not live in Nashville but for some reason I love the City like I have lived their my whole life. Since I was about twelve I have always said that I want to live in Nashville someday. Living in Lawrenceburg all my life (other then a year in Columbia and two in Murfreesboro) you would have to go out of town to go out to eat or for shopping; your choices are Florence, Huntsville or Nashville, I always wanted to go see Nashville. It's like someone said on a different post "Nashville has that cool factor," and Nashville's size (for someone from small town) always impressed me. I worked in Nashville for about three years for I.C. Thomasson and that to me felt like a privilege, because I felt that I was part of building Nashville. You would think that someone would have had trouble adjusting from small town to big town atmosphere, but like someone said "Nashville has that small town feel," only the traffic did I have to get adjusted to. The best way I have found to put the typical big city attitude versus small town attitude is that in small towns people trust you until you disprove your trust and in big cities people have to earn their trust, but in Nashville to me I did not sense the typical big town attitude. It's not uncommon to strike a conversation to a stranger you have never met while going up an elevator, or doing what ever. I always enjoyed when I would have to go to LDD in the Cummings Station or to Earl Swensson in West End, because I got to go and see downtown and in a way that made me feel like a Nashvillian even though I'm not. By the way there is a great view of downtown at (Lowe Plaza or Vanderbilt Plaza) where ever Earl Swensson's office is, (I can not remember the name of the building their in) but the Parking garage on the back of their building has about ten or elevens levels and their is a really great view from there for you camera happy folks. But, I love Nashville and I hope that I get to live there one day. I hope it is ok for someone not from Nashville talk about why they love Nashville.

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There are some people who see the glass as half-full; there are other people who see the glass as having tricked them into becoming a victim and somehow thinking their alternative world could bud better but instead the glass is as non-urban as you can get with way too many churches and conservatism spreading like a virus in the glass yet somehow the glass is getting glassier while the poor are getting poorier, turning some people into a heckling victim.

<<Tistic initiated radio edit... :blush: ...Tistic taking time out for sensitivity training>>

Very insightful and absolutely true, IMO. I feel very sorry for people afflicted with that type of thinking. I can't help but think that it's a recipe for unhappiness.

I'm from Atlanta, and will always love that place because all my family is there, it is my home, and becuase GEORGIA TECH FOOTBALL RULES!!! That said, I'm proud to call this rocky top state my home.

I just wanted to to say I graduated from Tech and LOVE Tech football too! Go Jackets!!!!!!!!!

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Wow, that post was as depressing as Dave's was uplifting. Can the city Heckles described be the same one Dave described? I won't say that perspective is relative in this case but Heckles unfortunately has greater troubles than where he lives. His elitism is quite troubling and mostly sad. I hope you find the home you're looking for Heckles, not only in another city but within yourself.

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After all these post, I have very little to offer that hasn't already been said.

But coming from a small (less than 6,000) town in rural western Kentucky and being the product of a family in the coal mining industry dating back over 100 years, Nashville was a welcoming site for my life. Not only did it give me a beautiful, and somtimes annoying (LOL!!!) wife, but it gave me a chance to do the things I want to do in my life. To me, Nashville is a dream come true maker. But you have to give a little to get a little in this town. Nothing is handing to you like most places in the states. And nothing, not one thing at all, comes easy here. Even to the hardest worker. That's why I love it. Because for all I do, I know that one of theses days both Casey and I will have something worth while to show for it.

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Wow, that post was as depressing as Dave's was uplifting. Can the city Heckles described be the same one Dave described? I won't say that perspective is relative in this case but Heckles unfortunately has greater troubles than where he lives. His elitism is quite troubling and mostly sad. I hope you find the home you're looking for Heckles, not only in another city but within yourself.

Hey, maybe Heckles just needs to get laid... by a female. :rofl:

Maybe you need to read the rules before you post here again after your suspension. There is no reason for a post such as this on UrbanPlanet.

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I'm glad to know that I'm popular enough to be quoted back over here. ;)

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Wow, that post was as depressing as Dave's was uplifting. Can the city Heckles described be the same one Dave described? I won't say that perspective is relative in this case but Heckles unfortunately has greater troubles than where he lives. His elitism is quite troubling and mostly sad. I hope you find the home you're looking for Heckles, not only in another city but within yourself.

Elitism? Dislike is not elitism.

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Hmm, now that I've had a chance to see what everyone's been saying, and I see that people either feel sad for me, all the way to saying I have more issues than the city (oh my! :)) How's about we just agree to disagree?

I guess I could technically come to one of these coffee meets on a saturday just to say hey to dave and everyone who I have met. It could be my farewell meet. I cancelled all my travel plans for the summer (including the Toronto trip, so I won't be there Lexy) so that I can move.

Anywho, I must get to bed. nite to all who are still awake ;)

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