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ATLBrain

City Officials to Rewrite Zoning Laws

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I must admit that I don't understand the whole esoterica of zoning restrictions and variances et.al.... despite my sporadic attempts to learn more. This article seems like a good primer (Metro Zoning for Dummies) as it shed some light on the fact that (as is now) a developer could get a variance with a hardship case.

There's also a quote from a member of the old Nashville guard (I'll hold my comments on her). :)

http://www.tennessean.com/apps/pbcs.dll/ar...ESS01/605070377

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I must admit that I don't understand the whole esoterica of zoning restrictions and variances et.al.... despite my sporadic attempts to learn more. This article seems like a good primer (Metro Zoning for Dummies) as it shed some light on the fact that (as is now) a developer could get a variance with a hardship case.

There's also a quote from a member of the old Nashville guard (I'll hold my comments on her). :)

http://www.tennessean.com/apps/pbcs.dll/ar...ESS01/605070377

I dont think I will reserve comment though.

"What do we have in the downtown that would call for a building that tall?" said Ann Deol, a neighborhood activist in the Trimble area just south of downtown. "Maybe they're more insightful than I am."

I think she is right, they do have more insight than her. The area just south of downtown is one of those areas that really need to raised and burned with the exception of some older buildings. Its a collection of strip clubs and adult book stores, run down homes and businesses. What she does not realize is the resurgence of the downtown area will be good for the area just south of downtown. :shok:

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I have seen this "woman" at zoning board meetings before. She is a very, VERY vocal NIMBY for the Greer Stadium area and all that is SOUTH of the interstate loop. She needs to worry about her own district and quite worrying about the downtown, something she really has no clue about. People like her make the redneck (not that I really have any though) in me stand at attention! BY GOD!!!!

Stupid NIMBY.

LMAO!!!!!

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I dont think I will reserve comment though.

"What do we have in the downtown that would call for a building that tall?" said Ann Deol, a neighborhood activist in the Trimble area just south of downtown. "Maybe they're more insightful than I am."

I think she is right, they do have more insight than her. The area just south of downtown is one of those areas that really need to raised and burned with the exception of some older buildings. Its a collection of strip clubs and adult book stores, run down homes and businesses. What she does not realize is the resurgence of the downtown area will be good for the area just south of downtown. :shok:

Ron as usual, I'm soooooooo with you on this. This kind of attitude drives me crazy! Well Ann, if Tony wants to build it, people want to live there and a hotel wants to locate there then that's what calls for it! This isn't just about one tower or just about its height. (Oh man, did I just say that?) We cannot let fear of the appearance of our skyline stunt progress. I'm happy to listen to economic concerns or even architectural concerns over ST but to say it's not needed because it's never been done before is intellectually lazy.

I asked a question at the forum meet while we were walking down Church. If Tony sells out all 400 units and if he lands a flag for the hotel, where is a reduction in height going to come from if it is not approved? Is the city going to tell Tony he must remove the hotel component thus reducing future tax revenue and hotel rooms our city is trying to develop? Or are they going to tell Tony to reduce the number of units thus restricting his profitability while at the same time reducing the number of potential people who would call downtown home? Again, something the city is aggressively promoting. Or would they require Tony to eliminate the crown and spire virtually destroying one of the strongest design elements of the building? Doorman had a great point. He asked, "How is the city going to say no to a man that wants to invest $275 million in the growth of Nashville?" Sorry if that's not an exact quote doorman. The question is, are we really going to say no to a building because we're afraid it won't look right in our skyline even if the economics make sense?

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"But maybe not? Some people might say, that sounds like New York."

What's wrong with that? Isn't sounding like New York a good thing?

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Am very happy the city is taking notice of it true possibility for a more dense downtown by raising the height restrictions and allowing developers to build their dream towers if the demand is their. This topic has always been important to me. I'm perry sure every mid-size city that is or is having a building boom like ours, there our certain people that don't want change. Don't want everything that larger cities bring.

I personally CAN'T WAIT!!!!! :yahoo: For the longest time I always felt that Nashville had limited growth.

But not any more! The more articles that I read like this, the more I feel like the city is embracing true growth downtown.

I know once Sig Tower is built it going to open a new chapter for our beautiful city. And open the door for more high rises to be constructed!!!!!!!!!!!! :D

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Fascinating how many of the "die hards" in the city feel that NOW is the time as well. That is far more encouraging than some would think from Nashville. Some saw the light, and it was good. I'm just glad we haven't reached our "seventh day" yet and the work continues on rebuilding (and redefining) our core.

Here is a fantastic quote from the article:

The new rules would also help the city mark off a core area where towers would be encouraged. The goal is to keep Nashville from pushing ever outward by creating a center that would draw in offices, businesses and residents.

That will prevent the "Atlanta" effect from happening here IMO.

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I have seen this "woman" at zoning board meetings before. She is a very, VERY vocal NIMBY for the Greer Stadium area and all that is SOUTH of the interstate loop. She needs to worry about her own district and quite worrying about the downtown, something she really has no clue about. People like her make the redneck (not that I really have any though) in me stand at attention! BY GOD!!!!

Stupid NIMBY.

LMAO!!!!!

I look at it issue by issue on NIMBYisms, but this old "Shortyist" bag is way off base. How bad is it when usually spacey Ludye Wallace (LUDYE WALLACE !?!?) has the most common-sense and reasoned sound-bite on the subject: "They may worry, but in a lot of places, they ought to be glad," said Councilman Ludye N. Wallace, whose district includes the Gulch and some abutting areas. "Change is not always bad."

I'm doing my duty and agreeing with Ludye. :lol:

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I hear the ''Atlanta effect'' but if you are driving on I-40 through the downtown loop with downtown plus sig tower on one side. The Icon and Terrazo backed up to the interstate and the WES, Adelicia, and Palmer on the other side it would look pretty impressive to me. By 2010 1st Ave to I-440 will be a monster of a pano.

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Ron as usual, I'm soooooooo with you on this. This kind of attitude drives me crazy! Well Ann, if Tony wants to build it, people want to live there and a hotel wants to locate there then that's what calls for it! This isn't just about one tower or just about its height. (Oh man, did I just say that?) We cannot let fear of the appearance of our skyline stunt progress. I'm happy to listen to economic concerns or even architectural concerns over ST but to say it's not needed because it's never been done before is intellectually lazy.

I asked a question at the forum meet while we were walking down Church. If Tony sells out all 400 units and if he lands a flag for the hotel, where is a reduction in height going to come from if it is not approved? Is the city going to tell Tony he must remove the hotel component thus reducing future tax revenue and hotel rooms our city is trying to develop? Or are they going to tell Tony to reduce the number of units thus restricting his profitability while at the same time reducing the number of potential people who would call downtown home? Again, something the city is aggressively promoting. Or would they require Tony to eliminate the crown and spire virtually destroying one of the strongest design elements of the building? Doorman had a great point. He asked, "How is the city going to say no to a man that wants to invest $275 million in the growth of Nashville?" Sorry if that's not an exact quote doorman. The question is, are we really going to say no to a building because we're afraid it won't look right in our skyline even if the economics make sense?

GUYS....

Before we start calling names...it is important that we have no true height limitations in the CC Zoning district. This would include most of the downtown CORE. I think it is important to remember the overall design of a downtown and this would include building heights.

If this tower makes the $ cut...should we make sure that no additional towers top it? Think of the empire state building and the world trade center. The WTC..when constructed...let Manhattan a little off balance. What do we want the overall form of downtown to look like in the future? Do we want the Sig to be the tallest? Do we care?

These....and other questions.....are the ones we need to ask ourselves right now. What do you think?

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Do we want the Sig to be the tallest? Do we care?

These....and other questions.....are the ones we need to ask ourselves right now. What do you think?

I think you should first ask yourself "What will I do with my downtown parcel/lot that I own?" Once you've found the answer to that question, then you'll be one step closer to deciding how the downtown skyline will look in the future.

On the other hand, if you happen to not own any land dowtown, then it turns out you have absolutely NO say in how things progress. After realizing that, you may join the rest of us in the cheerleading section... :yahoo:

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I found this very interesting post by "Insighter" on another website. It refers to what may happen once the new downtown zoning laws get approved. I f half of what he descibes is true, Holey Moley!!!!!!

"Just this week, metro government is changing its zoning laws to allow supertalls in downtown and midtown. I know of several developers who are waiting for this to pass before announcing their projects."

"Like Lexy said. We know of one 45 story office tower planned for the lot adjacent to the Schermerhorn Symphony Center that will come in at around 700 ft. Additionally, there are two other very tall hotels in the 40-50 story range rumored to follow wherever the new convention center goes."

"Regarding the office building next to SSC: Its anchor tenants are purported to be Central Parking and one of the largest law firms in the country. And there is a third relocating company (not Nissan) considering this new building. I work for a bank that looked at this proposed building. We haven't yet ruled it out."

"There has been a lot of quiet development on this building, but it's pretty far along. I've seen detailed renderings of it and it's a stunning looking, sleek modern building with a hint of art deco flair. This building could be up before the end of 2009. "

"Plus, Michael Hayes and the Renaissance are both in the early stages of adding 30+ story towers near Broadway."

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I found this very interesting post by "Insighter" on another website. It refers to what may happen once the new downtown zoning laws get approved. I f half of what he descibes is true, Holey Moley!!!!!!

"Just this week, metro government is changing its zoning laws to allow supertalls in downtown and midtown. I know of several developers who are waiting for this to pass before announcing their projects."

"Like Lexy said. We know of one 45 story office tower planned for the lot adjacent to the Schermerhorn Symphony Center that will come in at around 700 ft. Additionally, there are two other very tall hotels in the 40-50 story range rumored to follow wherever the new convention center goes."

"Regarding the office building next to SSC: Its anchor tenants are purported to be Central Parking and one of the largest law firms in the country. And there is a third relocating company (not Nissan) considering this new building. I work for a bank that looked at this proposed building. We haven't yet ruled it out."

"There has been a lot of quiet development on this building, but it's pretty far along. I've seen detailed renderings of it and it's a stunning looking, sleek modern building with a hint of art deco flair. This building could be up before the end of 2009. "

"Plus, Michael Hayes and the Renaissance are both in the early stages of adding 30+ story towers near Broadway."

Wow! If these come to fruitation the Nashville skyline is going to change quicker and more drastically than anyone imagined. :shok:

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