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$100-Million Shopping Center Approved For Stonington


HartfordTycoon

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On the bright side ... at least CT will be taking away business from Rhode Island

Yeah, let's look at things on the bright side. C'mon let's get this $$$ CT!!! We need to get serious about business. We always blame taxes but The NIMBYism is another huge reason why the Northeast is lagging behind the south and west. Who wants to pay high taxes AND face a bunch of angry NIMBYs all the time. Nobody, that's who. When I lived in Atlanta, every proposal was fast tracked. No protest. They would laugh at how backwards we are. I'm not saying that all development is good development, but we need to make sure we are allowing all of the good developments, remember we are at least a decade behind much of the country.

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NIMBYs are Connecticut's biggest enemies. We should be a big powerful state. The sad thing is we easily could be.

NIMBYs do have a part of why we aren't as mighty as we could be. NIMBYs killed the Hartford Beltway, many of the Eastern CT highway proposals of the 60s (via stalling until the state ran out of funds). Although they would have encouraged sprawl, they would have resulted in more money invested in the state around the highway exits. In Hartford's case, having the beltway instead of the patchwork of connector roads they have now would have made it a much easier place to get around, and may have had a positive effect on the business climate.

In the case of things like shopping centers, I think we need to stray away from sprawling big box developments when we can. It's what's destroying both the urban and rural character of the country. We are seeing too many devlopment that isn't quite urban, but isn't anything close to rural either. This type of development is typified by Manchester and Warwick. It is what makes an "exurb" an "exurb". I'd rather what cities and suburbs we have now fill in and even build up rather than spread out the way we continue to see.

You could call it a pro-environment stance (which it is), but I think of it more as a quality of life issue. I have lived in a city (Providence) and loved it, and right now live in the country (Preston) and love it. I grew up with relatives I visited all the time in Preston, but my parents were in Norwich. Norwich has turned itself from a nice, small city (wayyyy back before I was even born) to what you could call an "exurb". No real city center, sprawl all over. Not much walkability. It has nice aspects like Norwich Free Academy, Mohegan Park, historic Norwichtown; but overall it's just bland or run down, or both.

I also believe that taxes and regulations in this state are what's most prohibitive to business.

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NIMBYs do have a part of why we aren't as mighty as we could be. NIMBYs killed the Hartford Beltway, many of the Eastern CT highway proposals of the 60s (via stalling until the state ran out of funds). Although they would have encouraged sprawl, they would have resulted in more money invested in the state around the highway exits. In Hartford's case, having the beltway instead of the patchwork of connector roads they have now would have made it a much easier place to get around, and may have had a positive effect on the business climate.

In the case of things like shopping centers, I think we need to stray away from sprawling big box developments when we can. It's what's destroying both the urban and rural character of the country. We are seeing too many devlopment that isn't quite urban, but isn't anything close to rural either. This type of development is typified by Manchester and Warwick. It is what makes an "exurb" an "exurb". I'd rather what cities and suburbs we have now fill in and even build up rather than spread out the way we continue to see.

You could call it a pro-environment stance (which it is), but I think of it more as a quality of life issue. I have lived in a city (Providence) and loved it, and right now live in the country (Preston) and love it. I grew up with relatives I visited all the time in Preston, but my parents were in Norwich. Norwich has turned itself from a nice, small city (wayyyy back before I was even born) to what you could call an "exurb". No real city center, sprawl all over. Not much walkability. It has nice aspects like Norwich Free Academy, Mohegan Park, historic Norwichtown; but overall it's just bland or run down, or both.

I also believe that taxes and regulations in this state are what's most prohibitive to business.

Taxes play a role too. I just bring up the NIMBYs to show that there are many factors in the Northeast's decline. I think that we are starting to make headway on both issues though. That's a positive I think we can agree on.

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  • 2 weeks later...

If it's gonna happen, thank goodness it's a Lowe's vs Home Depot. Lowe's is like the Target of DIY stores.

Lowes is more expensive and seems to put more of an emphisas on the more "girlie" DIY stuff to put simply. If that's your thing, fine. But the stores each have their own niche market within the DIY crowd. Having said that, home depot is pretty crappy. Anyone who buys lumber from them is asking for trouble. I'd prefer if neither of them came in... We already have a few Lowes and Home Depots in the general area and there are already a good supply of small lumber yards and hardware stores.

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there's more backyards in the northeast than the south or west. that's why there's more nimby's. :P

:lol: I think it's because to a larger extent our population is older and entrenched. Most people that live in the northeast are pretty close to home, where they grew up or parents still live. I think in the south and midwest a lot more of the population moved there for cheap living when there wasn't anything there, and then when they start building new developments, they feel more like "finally" as opposed to " Oh, no. Not this again."

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:lol: I think it's because to a larger extent our population is older and entrenched. Most people that live in the northeast are pretty close to home, where they grew up or parents still live. I think in the south and midwest a lot more of the population moved there for cheap living when there wasn't anything there, and then when they start building new developments, they feel more like "finally" as opposed to " Oh, no. Not this again."

there's also a lot more land... there's no much land in the northeast outside of ME, NH, VT (which shouldn't be developed in my opinion). the land in SE CT might seem vast, but it's really not in comparison to other places, and it's more dense than you would think just by driving through, but it still is mostly rural.

i don't spend a ton of time in stonington, but this would probably be a great development for them. the nearest shopping plaza like that is where? waterford, new london, groton... or the other side... westerly where the sales tax is higher... (i wouldn't shop in RI if i lived there either... it's too expensive, i go to seekonk or north attleboro when i need to make a big purchase, like my air conditioner).

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We already have a few Lowes and Home Depots in the general area and there are already a good supply of small lumber yards and hardware stores.

Plus, they're building a Home Depot in Uncasville. That will make 4 in the area! Not to mention 2 Lowe's once Stonington is built! Enough is enough. At this rate, all SE CT residents will have their own private store before long.

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