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Signature Tower out of Place?

Signature Tower out of Place?   147 members have voted

  1. 1. Signature Tower out of Place?

    • No - it will add a lot to Nashville's skyline
      99
    • Yes - I would rather see a couple of shorter towers instead
      21
    • I don't think it will be built
      24
    • No opinion
      3

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110 posts in this topic

Let me start by saying this isn't a negative post about Nashville as I think it is great there is a proposal such as this in the city. My question however is, if the Signature building is built, do you will think it will look out of place given the height of the building compared to anything else in the city?

One notible example of where this has taken place, though not to the level as that in Nashville is the effect the Taipei 101 tower had on Taipei's skyline. We had a discussion about this once here on UrbanPlanet.

taipei101.jpg

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In regards to Nashville, the L&C Tower if often noted, which was by far the tallest building in Nashville and the entire southeast at the time. It was tall, but I don't think the average joe thought it looked 'out of place.' It was a symbol of pride for Nashville. I don't see how Signature is any different. It's just raising expectations, and it is a beautifully designed building. In any case, to only judge it by it's asthetic value is short-sighted. It's economic impact on downtown is just as significant.

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In regards to Nashville, the L&C Tower if often noted, which was by far the tallest building in Nashville and the entire southeast at the time. It was tall, but I don't think the average joe thought it looked 'out of place.' It was a symbol of pride for Nashville. I don't see how Signature is any different. It's just raising expectations, and it is a beautifully designed building. In any case, to only judge it by it's asthetic value is short-sighted. It's economic impact on downtown is just as significant.

The L&C is just over 400 feet tall. The difference in scale between 400 feet and 1000 feet is immense. What will be the economic impact after it is built? A boutique hotel staff, cleaning and maintenance people, a couple of retail shops?

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The L&C is just over 400 feet tall. The difference in scale between 400 feet and 1000 feet is immense. What will be the economic impact after it is built? A boutique hotel staff, cleaning and maintenance people, a couple of retail shops?

I'm not comparing the height of L&C and Signature. I'm referring to the height of L&C to the existing buildings in the 1950's. I thought the parallel was obvious.

Do you not realize that the 800+ people who live in Signature tower will have tons of disposable income? Do you think retail developers will ignore this? Along with other forthcoming residential projects, Signature will be a boost for current and future downtown retail. That's good, right?

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Supposing 800 people actually live in Signature Tower. What kind of retail would cater to people living there? Would the rest of Nashville be welcome in those places?

And the comparison b/n L&C and a 1000 foot tower is not obvious. A 400 foot tower in relation to surrounding low rise buildings does not dominate the way something twice as tall does.

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The Signature Tower will stick out less than the L&C did. The L&C was at least three times taller than the next tallest, whereas the Signature Tower is less than twice as tall as the next. Both of these towers were among the tallest in the area at the time that they were (or will be) built. I think that the relationship between the two is very obvious.

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I think it would be a great addition to y'alls skyline. Usually, cities get taller gradually, but you guys are taking one huge leap and skipping straight to the point. I say, since youve got the opportunity, be gratetful. Id be pretty happy if it was built in my city. Very jealous over here :blush:

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Nashville, looked somewhat like this when the L&C was built. It stood alone for nearly ten years.

LC.jpg

And remember, America's greatest skyscraper, the Empire State Building, is in an area of 'relative' low rises.

NYNY069.jpg

NYNY063.jpg

It only makes it look better, in my opinion.

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I think you guys are making a bigger deal out of it than what it really is. According to the official website, the Signature Tower will only be 65 stories. it's not THAT tall, really... for a city as important as Nashville.

This is pretty huge, but check out this picture. It actually fits nicely with the rest of the downtown.

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Well technically it's about 70 floors, and that rendering was from when it was probably about 850 feet tall. So yeah, it'll stick out more than that picture shows. But still, I don't care if it sticks out a little. I'm sure the gap will be filled in soon.

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That aerial of Nashville is a remarkable picture, PH, and quite appropriate. Where'd you get it? Are there others like it?

Here's where I'm taking a stab at the provenance of the picture: It appears to be a rendering (retouched photo perhaps) showing an early plan for what was the proposed I-265 loop some time around the early to mid 60s. Note the cloverleaf interchanges at Demonbreun and Charlotte (which also shows a viaduct over the expressway).

It's interesting to see the little ramp connecting Union to Church around the site of the newer Public Library which wasn't yet built (mid 60s).

Also missing from the picture are the Municipal Auditorium (early 60s), the Federal CH Annex (???), Third National Bank (mid 60s) and original portion of Parkway Towers (early 60s).

It's reminiscent of something that Paradigm might have done if it had been around 45 years ago. Now compare this photo to the one from RMH of the skyline with proposed ballpark in the foreground.

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It's much taller now than in that rendering. The signaturetowernashville.com website has been updated. Here are a few renderings for the site. It's a monster.

SigTower1.jpg

SigTower2.jpg

SigTower3.jpg

SigTower4.jpg

SigTower5.jpg

SigTower6.jpg

SigTower7.jpg

If you want to see the renderings larger, go to the website and click on the image.

I love the fact that it's as tall as it is. Over time, other tall towers will be built in Nashville that will balance the skyline out. Signature Tower will raise the bar, and will hopefully inspire other future developments to go higher than they might have otherwise.

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It's much taller now than in that rendering. The signaturetowernashville.com website has been updated. Here are a few renderings for the site. It's a monster.

True, Signature will stand taller than a preschool teacher in a class photo.

I was referring mainly to the amount of development that has occurred in DT Nashville since the pic was made in the early 60s. That's what I find amazing.

Does anybody know if Metro Council approved the zoning changes to allow taller towers DT and Midtown?

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This is what Charlotte would have looked like (2000 skyline) if First Union's (Wachovia) 1999 proposal to build a new 70+ story head quarters building had been built. I believe it would have been around the height of the signature tower.

firstunion%202.jpg

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From street level, Signature will look just fine. Who the hell cares what it looks like from the Interstate? You should have your eyes on the road not on the skyline. LOL

I wish Tony success with this one. If his recent projects are an indicator, he'll have at least one more really tall one planned before Signature is completed.

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The Signature Tower is definitely going to stick out, but in a good way.

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I can see how comparisons between Sig Tower and the Empire State building are applicable.

1sigtowera.jpg

googleearthempirestate4.jpg

Let's see, Nashville has what four, five buildings over 400 feet and midtown Manhattan has, hmm, hundreds?!

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Supposing 800 people actually live in Signature Tower. What kind of retail would cater to people living there? Would the rest of Nashville be welcome in those places?

And the comparison b/n L&C and a 1000 foot tower is not obvious. A 400 foot tower in relation to surrounding low rise buildings does not dominate the way something twice as tall does.

Well, possibly retail that caters to people who eat, wear clothes, and buy things for their home. I don't mean just retail in the building, but also the surrounding neighborhood. Even a new fast food joint a block or two away would be frequented by Sig residents. A new upscale eatery near or in Sig would appeal to other downtown residents/workers like me. The Schermerhorn is already attracting businesses like Past/Perfect and the relocated Sole Mio. In my experience and observation, various retail follows residents, whether is an urban or suburban environment.

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That aerial of Nashville is a remarkable picture, PH, and quite appropriate. Where'd you get it? Are there others like it?

Here's where I'm taking a stab at the provenance of the picture: It appears to be a rendering (retouched photo perhaps) showing an early plan for what was the proposed I-265 loop some time around the early to mid 60s. Note the cloverleaf interchanges at Demonbreun and Charlotte (which also shows a viaduct over the expressway).

It's interesting to see the little ramp connecting Union to Church around the site of the newer Public Library which wasn't yet built (mid 60s).

Also missing from the picture are the Municipal Auditorium (early 60s), the Federal CH Annex (???), Third National Bank (mid 60s) and original portion of Parkway Towers (early 60s).

It's reminiscent of something that Paradigm might have done if it had been around 45 years ago. Now compare this photo to the one from RMH of the skyline with proposed ballpark in the foreground.

It is a remarkable picture. It was entirely hand painted for TDOT in the early 60's to show an early proposal for the 'inner loop' around downtown. It has incredible detail and must have taken months to complete. There are 3 or 4 of these renderings from different perspectives. This one is also shown in the 'Plan of Nashville'.

There are some mistakes in it, but it doesn't detract from the overall impression. Here is the full picture.

Spring004.jpg

Obviously, the cloverleafs were taken out (rightfully so) for the current configuration, which actually works fairly well. The exception being, of course, the 2nd and 4th Avenue exits on the south side.

It is a work of art and an important piece of history anyway and I hope it will be more accessible to the public some day.

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Well, possibly retail that caters to people who eat, wear clothes, and buy things for their home. I don't mean just retail in the building, but also the surrounding neighborhood. Even a new fast food joint a block or two away would be frequented by Sig residents. A new upscale eatery near or in Sig would appeal to other downtown residents/workers like me. The Schermerhorn is already attracting businesses like Past/Perfect and the relocated Sole Mio. In my experience and observation, various retail follows residents, whether is an urban or suburban environment.

Yeah, I can really see residents of the 65 story McTower stepping out to grab a Big Mac with the rest of us pleebs.

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I'm sure Tony would appreciate being compared to Charles Lindberg, the Wright Brothers and the first astronauts.

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Hmmm...I thought the point of most of the arguments against it was the difference between Signature and the next tallest buildings, not the number of next tallest buildings.

And I notice you didn't remark on Charlotte BOA and Mobile RSA. And don't say it is different because Charlotte didn't have as many 400 footers as Nashville does now.

Here I am from the Atlanta area and I'm proud for Nashville while others continually post negative comments. Ironically I received a PM and was called "childish" because I said the detractors were jealous. I stand by that statement because some have valid reasons while others are just perplexed because of the height difference and that point has been done to death.

Think about this, without the risk takers in our society, we would never have crossed the Atlantic, would never have built skyscraper one, would never have developed flight, been to the moon, etc. Your Tony G. is a risk taker and that is how great things are accomplished.

The reason the number of tall buildings in NYC makes a difference is the density of buildings softens the impact that the Empire State would make. The Sig Tower would be completely unobstructed from the south and almost entirely from the west. I've only been to Charlotte once, back in 97 or 98 and I remember being both impressed by the height of BOA and struck by the awkwardness of it in relation to the rest of the skyline.

Another problem I have with the Sig Tower is that it has basically become a gated community for the rich right smack dab in the middle of downtown with all the respect and sensitivity for its neighbors and environment that you might expect from a McMansion in the suburbs or a Cadillac Escalade for my Honda Civic. I think it would be much more positive and significant for Nashville if a tower of this magnitude was needed for offices like BOA in Charlotte.

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Supposing 800 people actually live in Signature Tower. What kind of retail would cater to people living there? Would the rest of Nashville be welcome in those places?

And the comparison b/n L&C and a 1000 foot tower is not obvious. A 400 foot tower in relation to surrounding low rise buildings does not dominate the way something twice as tall does.

In relevance to that time it did. You onlu have the perspective of what is around currently, but back then you can't say what would have been tall to you.

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In relevance to that time it did. You onlu have the perspective of what is around currently, but back then you can't say what would have been tall to you.

O.K., ya'll are right. There is no difference in how a 1000 foot tower and a 400 foot tower affects its surroundings. If the L&C Tower had been 1047 feet tall it would have had the same visual and spatial relationship to its environment as the actual L&C did.

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Are you trying to tell us that the Signature Tower is being built among the same group of buildings as the L&C Tower was when it was built 60 years ago?

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