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Metro Phoenix Development thread


MJLO

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I think most of these projects/proposals are going to get scrached due to the market. Wait for light rail to open, see how succesful it is and how the local market responds arond light rail. If it is positive, you will see more developments that will add to the valleys weak skyline.

If you look at Tempe, you know over half will not be built by the the estimated projection. Also, in the area, it seems like each proposal has a hotel associated with it. It seems like there are too many proposals for hotels in the tempe area right now.

also, with light rail, you will start to see cities codes and zoning ordanices reflecting the desire to build up in these areas. Some have already done that, and others are in the process or thinking about it.

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clarebear. Uptown has height restrictions, but due to the airport, it can go higher than downtown.

If you look at the phx urban form project, the massing in downtown shows that you can go over 700' in some of the areas. However, the airport will have a say on a project over 300'. cityscape is facing that problem right now. Uptown is a different cat. You can ask for variances and so forth to get additional height in uptown, but you have different obstacles in uptown than downtown. The reason is due to single family housing beings so close.

If you look on emporis web site, you can see the tallest proposal was the phoenix tower at 1,693 ft. or 114 stores. Toll brothers has a proposal for 658 ft or 50 stores. That is in the uptown area.

Just think , if cityscape gets its proposal approved, and built, it will have the tallest building in AZ.

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I know the folks doing the McDowell/Central 500' high rises just north of the library. It will be an awesome project.

Most likely, all the planned projects will await a healthier market. It takes a year or two to bring a project to the market, so they have time.

CenCo (Central Corridor) will soon become the hip place to be. If both One Phoenix and McDowell/Central get going, then that corner will become a little destination hub with a number of restaurants, etc. It would be great!

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I still get up to Phoenix fairly often. I know that most of the central Tempe condos and other structures were completed, but I don't think that they ended up selling very well. The Sheraton Downtown was built.

I went to a concert in Downtown Phoenix in the early spring, but haven't really been back since, except while driving through (I drove through the tunnel a couple of days ago, actually, but didn't exit). I'll check it out one day soon while I'm still unemployed.

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This annoys me This is the crap about PHX that annoys me to no end. To be a sustainable city, there needs to be density. Why the hell is it, that whenever anything of substantial height gets proposed in the Valley, do the residents cause such a crap storm that anyone willing to invest, outside of a giant retail box gives up? Can someone tell me, maybe a Valley insider, maybe a native, why is it that Arizonans hate tall buildings so damn much?
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Thought I'd throw something in here. I'll actually be in Phoenix, for a weekend, at the end of the month, so I'll take some pics then.

Daily Star article

Gist of the article: CityNorth has been foreclosed upon. It was to be a 144-acre mixed-use development in the Peoria area. This probably isn't a shock to anyone, considering Phoenix's real estate scene right now, but I thought I'd post.

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City north is actually on the boarder of Scottsdale and Phx, not Peoria.

Now to answer MLJO comment about density and the valley. First of all, you have to look at the history of this valley and when it grew. 80% of what exist right now is post world war II. You look at what was the norm, it was sprawling, car centered, separate uses type of development. That just didn’t happen here, but everywhere. Second, there are few obstacles to restrict growth such as large mtn ranges, body’s of water and so forth. Next is, people came here because it was cheap, and people could own land and single family home with great desert views. This is the west too, cant forget that.

Now in this forum, we talk about density, but what truly is density? Is it a tall skyscraper? Or is it a tight nit neighborhood and city of varied densities that met the needs of the people? I would say the latter. In fact, the whole city of LA one of or the highest density per sq mile than any other city in the country. However, people drive, and drive, and drive. Here is some data.

http://www.demographia.com/db-ua2000-4dense.htm

I would like to see an iconic downtown, but honestly, I really do not see that happening. I hope it does fill in all means that expands our small skyline that is seen on tv. I think that will happen, especially north of downtown. Also, density for the sack of density is not always a good, sustainable model. You have to work with your environment, and in the desert, you have to be very smart in how you encourage density. I think Phx’s urban form project addresses this from the best I have seen in any research I have done.

However, the way the valley is, you have to find ways to expand density in smart ways and use what we have already created in this valley. That to me means pockets of density, or urban villages. Most downtowns are restricted by height, development, use, prop 207 and so forth. Next, land is still relatively cheap, and it is cheaper to go out than up on many fronts.

I think Pinal county has looked at growth in a smart way in there comprehensive plan and scenarios. Good to look up sometime.

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I certainly don't disagree with you about smart growth and planning. I understand what you are saying. My problem is that I see valley residents, as having no vision at all. It's not about smart developement, it's about ANY developement. There are cities in the valley who will let anything in. I'd say west valley cities tend to be alot more liberal about growth. East Valley cities, namely Scottsdale, and Mesa, (mostly Scottsdale) tend to be very controlling as to how things are done. People in central Phoenix have built an invisible wall from south mountaint to the northern ranges, might as well have put a sign up telling developers " don't even bother". And lets face it, people in Tucson start hyperventilating and need blood pressure medication whenever they even see the word "change", no matter what context it might be used.

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