Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Andrea

Tall Buildings in Atlanta

11 posts in this topic

I happened to be watching a TV show about tornados, and they mentioned that in downtown Dallas there are 16 buildings over 40 stories.

The only ones of that size I can think of in downtown Atlanta are First Atlanta, Georgia Pacific, Peachtree Plaza, 191 Peachtree, the Marriott Marquis, SunTrust Plaza and BOA. That surprised me slightly because I'd always thought of Atlanta and Dallas as pretty similar.

I realize we've got a few others scattered around Midtown and Buckhead that are over 40 stories but I would have guessed the downtowns were more comparable. Wonder why they build them taller out there?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Their CBD is also more significant than ours. When comparing similar cities I hate to admit it, but Dallas has a much stronger downtown than Atlanta's. Even though there are a number of edge cities in Dallas - Richardson & Las Colinas in particular, as well as 'urban commercial districts' comparable to Midtown & Buckhead like Dallas' Uptown & University Park (probably not the right name - but it's between downtown & Richardson), downtown Dallas seems to be more relevant than downtown Atlanta. Speaking of Dallas' Uptown - it's a very strange comparison to Midtown. Certainly it's the newer high end modern annex of Downtown but it's so much more different. Hard to explain.

But take a visit to downtown Dallas - it is rather impressive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You know, I have not walked around in the business part of downtown Dallas in years. When I go there, I'm usually out in Highland Park, although I've been down to Deep Ellum a few times in the evening. It's an impressive city.

I still wonder why Dallas has so many more tall buildings than Atlanta. Is it just a difference in attitude about what will work there versus what's appropriate here?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to see some tall buildings in Atlanta myself. I know it's certainly not a necessity, but I'd really like to see at least one or two more supertalls (close to height of Bank of Americe Plaza) go up just for the effect it would have on the skyline.

Of course, Dallas is much bogger than Atlanta, so I'm not too surprised that it has a few more tall buildings in its CBD. Having a bigger CBD than Atlanta as well also helps this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The average height of the top ten skyscrapers in each city

Dallas - 740'

Atlanta - 758'

I counted 16 skyscrapers over 40 floors in Atlanta and 15 in Dallas.

Atlanta, while the buildings aren't crammed together like Dallas, certainly has the edge over Dallas in skyline. This doesn't even include the Buckhead and outlying buildings.

The real edge Dallas has is only in density.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I counted 16 skyscrapers over 40 floors in Atlanta.....

Cool, Plasticman.

Just out of curiosity, what are the 40-story plus buildings in Atlanta? I know that downtown there is First Atlanta, Georgia Pacific, Peachtree Plaza, 191 Peachtree, the Marriott Marquis, SunTrust Plaza and BOA. In midtown there's One Atlantic Center, The Grand, BellSouth, Promenade and 1180 Peachtree, and in Buckhead there's Park Place, Park Avenue and the Paramount. But I can't think of the other one!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The average height of the top ten skyscrapers in each city

Dallas - 740'

Atlanta - 758'

I counted 16 skyscrapers over 40 floors in Atlanta and 15 in Dallas.

Atlanta, while the buildings aren't crammed together like Dallas, certainly has the edge over Dallas in skyline. This doesn't even include the Buckhead and outlying buildings.

The real edge Dallas has is only in density.

I didn't count them but I was going to post the same thing. It seems that almost all of Dallas' tallest buildings are downtown. Whats also interesting it that most of them were built in the 80's. Dallas must have been rocking during that time period.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


One reason Dallas (and Houston and San Antonio) have skylines that could only be eclipsed by New York or Chicago or Hong Kong is the whole "Nieman Marcus" syndrome. Texas is basically the Saudi Arabia of the U.S. Remember how Exxon just made the largest profit of any company of any time ever in human history? Texas culture has it very deeply ingrained that you must show your success, be it trips to Neiman Marcus (hqed in Dallas and known for carrying some of the most outlandish and decadently expensive "southern" ciche imaginable), or outbuilding the "Ewings" across the street. I love them for it, used to date a Houston girl for a long time, so not intending that for a putdown at all, just that with Texans what you see is what you get, and they love showing you everything they got.

As far as comparing cities, I hate using # of floors, you could have a 600 ft. super scraper that is as wide as three city blocks with a towered roof reaching another 200 feet, but only 30 floors that include vaulted celings, this next to some paperthin 400 ft. tower that boxes floors in so tight they can fit in 45 floors. # of floors are highly arbitrary. Total structural height of all buildings 0-250 feet, 251-500 feet, 501 feet-750 feet, and 750 feet+ is a more accurate measure IMHO of the dynamics of skylines.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One reason Dallas (and Houston and San Antonio) have skylines that could only be eclipsed by New York or Chicago or Hong Kong is the whole "Nieman Marcus" syndrome. Texas is basically the Saudi Arabia of the U.S. Remember how Exxon just made the largest profit of any company of any time ever in human history? Texas culture has it very deeply ingrained that you must show your success, be it trips to Neiman Marcus (hqed in Dallas and known for carrying some of the most outlandish and decadently expensive "southern" ciche imaginable), or outbuilding the "Ewings" across the street. I love them for it, used to date a Houston girl for a long time, so not intending that for a putdown at all, just that with Texans what you see is what you get, and they love showing you everything they got.

As far as comparing cities, I hate using # of floors, you could have a 600 ft. super scraper that is as wide as three city blocks with a towered roof reaching another 200 feet, but only 30 floors that include vaulted celings, this next to some paperthin 400 ft. tower that boxes floors in so tight they can fit in 45 floors. # of floors are highly arbitrary. Total structural height of all buildings 0-250 feet, 251-500 feet, 501 feet-750 feet, and 750 feet+ is a more accurate measure IMHO of the dynamics of skylines.

Gotta love Texas (or these days, Texico). According to the World Almanac, which lists total number of skyscrapers over 400 feet in North American cities, Dallas has about the same # as Atlanta. Houston has a few more. All three cities are basically equalled or exceeded by San Francisco and Toronto. San Antonio is listed as having fewer and shorter ones than Charlotte. These cities (except San Antonio), along with Atlanta, Philadelphia, Boston, LA, and Miami have similar skylines. And it looks from the list of under construction buildings that Miami is far ahead, and will leapfrog over them all, including LA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gotta love Texas (or these days, Texico).

Don't forget the Mexicans were there before the Texans - Tejano culture is also more prominant than Mexican culture in Texas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.