Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

ZachariahDaMan

U-of-M Stadium renovation

40 posts in this topic

By 2010 the 80-year-old U-M stadium skyline is supposed to be totally changed. The renoavtion will cost $226-million. There will be 83 additional luxury suites, nearly 3,200 clus seats, improvements to widen concourses, aisles, general seating and handicap accesibility and a new press box. The capacity of the nation's largest stadium would increase from 107,501 to 108,251.

Detroit Free Press article

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


what's the next largest stadium? Is it the Horse shoe? Or is it the Volunteers stadium? It's awsome to have U of M in my state. Gives me pride. I bleed maize and blue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe the next largest would be Penn State's Beaver Stadium with a capacity of 107,282.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Michigan's Stadiums is largest followed by Penn State, and then the Vol's.

Nice to see our capacity increase!!

Here's the diagram:

michiganstadiumrenovation.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting. It's always kind of surprised me that Michigan Stadium wasn't one of the first to add these. I have mixed feeling on these type of expansions as they bring in more money for the athletic departments of these universities, but they are built exclusively for the wealthy alumni. What I meant by exclusively is that there has been a huge debacle concerning Spartan Stadiums new expansion in that only those with suites (and their guest) can use the elevators. The disabled have been hassled and turned away at the elevators. The athletic department has supported this policy saying that there are ramps and everything is fully-handicap accessible, but the thing is that it's very impratical, as the stadium is pretty tall and steep. It's not so much the policy, but the meaning behind it. Also, quite a few cheaper seats were removed to make way for the expansion.

Michigan Stadium won't have this problem, as it's mostly below grade, but it explains why I have mixed views on this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems like football stadiums are the only sporting venues (JLA being the exception) where the suites have the worst views...especially in college stadiums where suites are a late fashion.

I'm not sure how I feel about this one yet. I like the arches, but I'm not really liking the big block on the end where the stairwell is. I think more renderings may change my mind though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did they totally give up on the original design, or was that just a prelim. concept? It will be interesting to see how they make this work. I really didn't expect them to go the post-modern route with this one for some reason, and I'm not so sure I like it. I don't know, perhaps if there was something already there to build off of in terms of historical architecture, but this just looks kind of contrived. Don't get me wrong, this is a great design, but surprisingly it just doesn't "fit" Michigan Stadium.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I'm not too literate on UM campus architecture, but doesnt the IM Sports building have similar arches? I seem to recall that from a recent trip there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do like the use of arches and it does tie into some other campus architecture but im not really a huge fan of the design. I think the suites are a very good move and should make Michigan Stadium a much louder venue, but the design seems rather bland to me.

Theres also the issue of the Alumni approving this thing. My stepfather, a Michigan alum, seems to think they face some hurdles with the alumni making such drastic changes to one of the countries great stadiums.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After just listening to the AD on the radio, they tried to take similar design elements from Yost Arena and the IM Building to solidify the athletic campus. Keep in mind, these are only renderings. I feel the final product will look MUCH nicer than the graphic representations

As an alum, I hope this project goes forward quickly. The suites will not only pay for the stadium renovations, but a number of upgrades for the entire athletic department

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I LOVE the arches. But those elevator towers are gigantic. I wish they would work on those a bit. Additionally, they should have continued the arches all the way around. Look at the far right, there is still that ugly, nasty aluminum cladding! I was certain they would strip that for something nicer. I really don't know of anyone that would cry over that being covered or removed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The same thing happened at Spartan Stadium with people lamenting the loss of general seating for the giant new expansion which included a new press box and luxury suites for alumni, but it brings in the money for the program (which not only payed for the expansion, but other stadium upgrades for all of the fans), and not that many seats were loss. If MSU could approve of its project with a much more lack-luster football program, than I'm sure UofM doesn't have much problem with this.

BTW, don't get me wrong, this is actually a very nice design, but I think it's a little too "safe" and bland for the UofM. Being up on a hill and everything, I'd really have liked to see some wacky Calatrava design with spires, fins, or other non-conventional architectural elements.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The same thing happened at Spartan Stadium with people lamenting the loss of general seating for the giant new expansion which included a new press box and luxury suites for alumni, but it brings in the money for the program (which not only payed for the expansion, but other stadium upgrades for all of the fans), and not that many seats were loss. If MSU could approve of its project with a much more lack-luster football program, than I'm sure UofM doesn't have much problem with this.

BTW, don't get me wrong, this is actually a very nice design, but I think it's a little too "safe" and bland for the UofM. Being up on a hill and everything, I'd really have liked to see some wacky Calatrava design with spires, fins, or other non-conventional architectural elements.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Leave the modernity at home. Michigan Stadium is a place of tradition and classicism, two things that last over time. The Big House been at the corner of Stadium and Main since 1927 and I don't think there is much sense "upgrading" the look with "modern" styles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


The design is based on a principle. Classical elements, such as the arch, and heavy elements such as stone or brick can be related to ideas such as power, tradition, and even athleticism. Think of the Roman collesium.

I don't mind the addition of traditonal elements at all. They've been trying to unify the athletic campus for sometime. And I've always admired the arches of the IM Building and Yost. Additionally, the Big House already has this type of architecture with the brick arches on the East concourse. I agree that it is good to expand on this feature.

The issue I have is that if they are going to pursue this, go all the way. Don't just put the arches up on two sides, go all the way around, even if that means dropping that wall down to 25 feet where there are no suites. Better yet, add a whole new open air circulation ring around the top!

IM Buiulding arches

im01.jpg

im02.jpg

After people saw the first two images on gameday, I was wondering if anybody was thinking of this guy:

im03.jpg

I wonder if the new stadium addition will come equipped with one bongo dude.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess it being a below grade stadium, something Michigan loves to do so much, I just never thought of it as "historic," despite its age. Like I said, it's not a bad design.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The design is based on a principle. Classical elements, such as the arch, and heavy elements such as stone or brick can be related to ideas such as power, tradition, and even athleticism. Think of the Roman collesium.

I don't mind the addition of traditonal elements at all. They've been trying to unify the athletic campus for sometime. And I've always admired the arches of the IM Building and Yost. Additionally, the Big House already has this type of architecture with the brick arches on the East concourse. I agree that it is good to expand on this feature.

The issue I have is that if they are going to pursue this, go all the way. Don't just put the arches up on two sides, go all the way around, even if that means dropping that wall down to 25 feet where there are no suites. Better yet, add a whole new open air circulation ring around the top!

IM Buiulding arches

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just saw this on the news. Very interesting how it may alter the sky-box plans and possibly force Michigan to loose the title of largest Stadium!

Ed. Dep't threatens 'U' with cuts in funds - Letter says stadium must comply with disabilities act

The U.S. Department of Education has given the University an ultimatum: Make the Michigan Stadium seating bowl compliant with the Americans With Disabilities Act or face cuts in federal education funding.

The threat was issued in a letter Friday from the department's Office for Civil Rights notifying the University that the stadium is not in compliance with federal laws requiring it to meet accessibility standards for disabled patrons.

Education Department spokesman Jim Bradshaw said in a written statement that the letter told the University it needs to address the number and location of wheelchair-accessible seats and the routes wheelchair users have to maneuver around the stadium.

Compliance with the ADA would require the University to make 1 percent of all the seats in the Big House wheelchair-accessible, bringing the total to more than 1,000. There are currently only 90 wheelchair-accessible seats in the stadium.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The solution is very simple. Provide open spaces to fit wheelchairs, that can also serve as standing room when wheelchairs are not present. That way we can sell standing room tickets and actually increase capacity dramatically. Or else, we can build a higher circulation ring. Make the entire ring around the stadium ADA accessible. Problem solved, and possibly allow an easier flow out of the stadium.

The unfair issue here is that the already existing spaces are NOT being filled. Maybe the U can prove a case that they are already providing more than enough space.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The University Elite have looked really bad throughout this whole stadium fiasco. It's been a PR nightmare. First they take off running with the idea of luxury boxes without really opening discussion with the students or alumni, then they go back behind closed doors and re-emerge with a really bland, uninspired, unfinished looking design and despite outcry charge on with that. Then, they (the regents and planners) continually ignore complaints about the stadium's ADA accessibility.

They've really gone about this whole thing in a bad way from the start. They weren't transparent and they've consistently ignored misgivings. From my perspective I get the impression that there's some dire impetus to get this thing done as quickly as possible without interruption or careful consideration for the finer details. Why are they in such a hurry to ram this thing down our throats? Why do they keep blowing off complaints by faculty, alumni, students, disable persons and now even the board of education?

They had such an opportunity here. They should have been completely open from the beginning and turned this into an opportunity to bring generations of alumni and faculty together...

Step. 1: you've decided on renovations, open the floor to public comment on things people would like to see changed, things that should stay the same

Step. 2: create a set of architectural, practical and monetary guidelines

Step. 3: get you're own architecture department involved. You've got 200+ students and faculty at your disposal; start a design competition and partner the school with an architecture firm of your choice (can't deny i'm just a little biased on this one)

Step. 4: bring a series of alternative plans back to the public for comment. ultimately the decision is yours but do try to piss off as few people as possible

Step. 5: even though it's technically only a "renovation", go out of your way to make this a venue we can all be proud of that truly symbolizes michigan rather than the special interests of the people at the top

-even if you have a few complaints, you can rest easily knowing that you made the process open and inviting

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The solution is very simple. Provide open spaces to fit wheelchairs, that can also serve as standing room when wheelchairs are not present. That way we can sell standing room tickets and actually increase capacity dramatically. Or else, we can build a higher circulation ring. Make the entire ring around the stadium ADA accessible. Problem solved, and possibly allow an easier flow out of the stadium.

The unfair issue here is that the already existing spaces are NOT being filled. Maybe the U can prove a case that they are already providing more than enough space.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...They had such an opportunity here. They should have been completely open from the beginning and turned this into an opportunity to bring generations of alumni and faculty together...

Step. 1: you've decided on renovations, open the floor to public comment on things people would like to see changed, things that should stay the same

Step. 2: create a set of architectural, practical and monetary guidelines

Step. 3: get you're own architecture department involved. You've got 200+ students and faculty at your disposal; start a design competition and partner the school with an architecture firm of your choice (can't deny i'm just a little biased on this one)

Step. 4: bring a series of alternative plans back to the public for comment. ultimately the decision is yours but do try to piss off as few people as possible

Step. 5: even though it's technically only a "renovation", go out of your way to make this a venue we can all be proud of that truly symbolizes michigan rather than the special interests of the people at the top

-even if you have a few complaints, you can rest easily knowing that you made the process open and inviting

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.