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CherryPink

African American Professionals in Charlotte

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I'm from the Washington DC metropolitan area where a wealth of very affluent African Americans live here. Washington DC/Maryland is the number 1 city in the nation for affluent African Americans.

I'm thinking of moving to Charlotte because of the rapid growth, and because it has that country yet progressive feel to it and isn't so city like Washington DC and Maryland.

What is the professional scene like (in general ) in Charlotte?

Is there a presence of affluent Blacks in Charlotte? What are the demographics? Where are the professional blacks??

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I'm from the Washington DC metropolitan area where a wealth of very affluent African Americans live here. Washington DC/Maryland is the number 1 city in the nation for affluent African Americans.

I'm thinking of moving to Charlotte because of the rapid growth, and because it has that country yet progressive feel to it and isn't so city like Washington DC and Maryland.

What is the professional scene like (in general ) in Charlotte?

Is there a presence of affluent Blacks in Charlotte? What are the demographics? Where are the professional blacks??

To be quite honest their is a massive pool of professional black workers here in Charotte (I work with some wonderful friends of mine who are quite well to do and actually do very well for themselves). Most are from the NE, but if you are lookng for a Sunbelt city that might offer a tad bit more I wold reccomend Atlanta. If you are a Family oriented person than Charotte will defnately fit like a glove. The reason I say Atlanta is because on a per person Basis, Atlanta has remained the leader in the US for having a affluent & professional black base to their overall economy.

The two cities are very unique in that they are both booming. One is just twenty years ahead and a bit more in-line with what you are used to in DC. That would be traffic and sprawl (no offense to my fellow Atlanta friends).

I actually live & work in Charlotte, but support Atlanta, as a territory for a large Financial firm and travel there quite often on business. I am in Atlanta quite often not only because of work, but also because of family. I like the city, but have been frustrated at the lax approach the city has had on developers creating a city of Urban and Suburban sprawl. They are getting better at curbing it, but it might be too little too late.

At any rate, Charlotte & Atlanta are both wonderful places for a black professional, it is all about what you want though.

Hope this helps.

A2

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I'm from the Washington DC metropolitan area where a wealth of very affluent African Americans live here. Washington DC/Maryland is the number 1 city in the nation for affluent African Americans.

I'm thinking of moving to Charlotte because of the rapid growth, and because it has that country yet progressive feel to it and isn't so city like Washington DC and Maryland.

What is the professional scene like (in general ) in Charlotte?

Is there a presence of affluent Blacks in Charlotte? What are the demographics? Where are the professional blacks??

By the way, Welcome to Urban Planet! :)

A2

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Thanks A2.

To be honest, I haven't seen too much discussion on this forum particularly on diversity for Charlotte. The topic has come up but people really haven't gotten into it. I've been told by others that Charlotte is part of the "Old South". Not in that they aren't working to progress (because they definitely are and there is A LOT of money there), but does Charlotte want it to become diverse? That is my question.

And I'll say up front that a large majority of those in Charlotte, do not want it to have an Atlanta feel to it (i.e. a diverse or very larger mix of African Americans there). I could be wrong, but that is my hunch on it from visiting.

I took a visit to Charlotte in March and liked what I saw as far as development goes and the money there. I think it's great! But I didn't see a professional black crowd involved in any of the "new" things that are taking place. And I'm interested to see just what role and involvement minorities in general are playing in this.

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Black male here...would probably be considered both professional and affluent. I've been here for amost a decade and I think Charlotte has the nice mix you're looking for. The city is about 1/3 Afr-Am, and I'm sure you're familiar with it's somewhat new status as a "destination" for blacks. This is palpable and accelerating. I think the thing you might notice most is the diversity of blacks here..many many from NE, west coast, Caribbean, motherland, etc. Also, more and more gay Afr-Ams settling in. We're not talking DC, but still, cool for a new south city. The professional "scene" is varied, cliquish, and stratified mostly by age and income. I'm sure you'd find your spot or spots. I've been pleased.

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Black male here...would probably be considered both professional and affluent. I've been here for amost a decade and I think Charlotte has the nice mix you're looking for. The city is about 1/3 Afr-Am, and I'm sure you're familiar with it's somewhat new status as a "destination" for blacks. This is palpable and accelerating. I think the thing you might notice most is the diversity of blacks here..many many from NE, west coast, Caribbean, motherland, etc. Also, more and more gay Afr-Ams settling in. We're not talking DC, but still, cool for a new south city. The professional "scene" is varied, cliquish, and stratified mostly by age and income. I'm sure you'd find your spot or spots. I've been pleased.

That's definitely good to hear! Because when I visited, I didn't see that affluent diversity at all.

I do agree that Charlotte will become the new destination for blacks.....which I like. I've been in DC for the past 4 years and could see myself moving to Charlotte once I'm ready to settle down and have a family. It's perfect for that.

I wonder what Robert Johnson and other affluent blacks are doing for Charlotte to assist with this...because it's needed.

The nightlife scene can use some upgrades...but it will all come in time!

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It's already coming (nightlife) As stated before, I think Charlotte has a great deal of professional African Americans, as well as a large amount of female professionals. Welcome to UP.

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It's already coming (nightlife) As stated before, I think Charlotte has a great deal of professional African Americans, as well as a large amount of female professionals. Welcome to UP.

Are there any websites available detailing events for professionals in Charlotte?

:)

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I'm not black (guess that doesn't really matter either way), but I moved here from the NE in 1994 and never once thought Charlotte was "Old South". That phrase in itself, to me anyway, has a negative connotation and had the city really fit that stereotype, I'd not have chosen to stay here. If anything, this city epitomizes the New South. When 8 out of 10 people that you meet here are from the NE/Midwest or West Coast, I don't think that Charlotte could remain Old South if she wanted to. I think you'd like it, but that's just me...

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Are there any websites available detailing events for professionals in Charlotte?

:)

Here are some links:

Black Professional Groups

100 Black Men of Charlotte Chapter

Charlotte Black Professionals Meetup.com Group

Charlotte Chamber Black Professionals Network

As far as Black Nitghtlife, it is a bit more spread out and smaller than DC, Baltimore or Atlanta. Black nightlife deffinetly lacks in the Centercity. Most Black Club owners have opted to open businesses in different coridors. Currently there is The V Lounge, and The House of Jazz for entertainment Uptown, and Merts Heart & Soul, The Coffee Cup & Simmons Fourth Ward restuarants within Uptowns 277 belt. With the Excelsior Club close by to downtown on Betties Ford Road. There are a slew of other Black owned businesses all around Charlotte.

Here are some links:

AOL African-American Scene Guide for Charlotte

Soul of America Charlotte Guide

There is another website that I can't think of, and couldn't find in Google, but it focuses more on special events.

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I'm not black (guess that doesn't really matter either way), but I moved here from the NE in 1994 and never once thought Charlotte was "Old South". That phrase in itself, to me anyway, has a negative connotation and had the city really fit that stereotype, I'd not have chosen to stay here. If anything, this city epitomizes the New South. When 8 out of 10 people that you meet here are from the NE/Midwest or West Coast, I don't think that Charlotte could remain Old South if she wanted to. I think you'd like it, but that's just me...

Thanks Turbo' for the comment. Actually my statement of Charlotte being the "Old South" came from a group of white friends of mine who have lived in the area and other places in the south, and who know about Charlotte (past and future).

I'd also heard that not everyone was happy when Bob Johnson took over ownership of the Charlotte Bobcats. You're also right in that even if people wanted it to remain the Old South..they couldn't. It's changing too much. But it's also wise to know just what people's attitudes are (are people welcoming to the change and new people, culture, diversity, etc.)

Also, the fact that there are so many people moving in from other places (the north especially) is good news!

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I'd also heard that not everyone was happy when Bob Johnson took over ownership of the Charlotte Bobcats.

Bob Johnson actually created the Bobcats as it was an expansion team. There was not a situation where he took it over from a White owner.

There was controversy with the Bobcats, but it was issue of bringing another NBA team to Charlotte. Prior to any announcements that Johnson was even being considered to be in the bidding, the public had already voted against the city spending tax money to build an areana to lure another NBA team here. The city did it anyway. That was why people were upset and it did not have anything to do with Johnson's race. There are a lot of people in the city that believe that city should have other priorities over building a $300M arena for the NBA.

The public was also against the former owner of the Charlotte Hornets (now the New Orleans Hornets) and he was White and even local.

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Bob Johnson actually created the Bobcats as it was an expansion team. There was not a situation where he took it over from a White owner.

There was controversy with the Bobcats, but it was issue of bringing another NBA team to Charlotte. Prior to any announcements that Johnson was even being considered to be in the bidding, the public had already voted against the city spending tax money to build an areana to lure another NBA team here. The city did it anyway. That was why people were upset and it did not have anything to do with Johnson's race. There are a lot of people in the city that believe that city should have other priorities over building a $300M arena for the NBA.

The public was also against the former owner of the Charlotte Hornets (now the New Orleans Hornets) and he was White and even local.

..yeah, I'd heard that the city basically ran him out.

Also....

Can anyone tell me why there are blank lines shown in the 'replies' and 'views' category of this thread? Numbers were showing up just yesterday.

Thanks!

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Because it was moved from the Charlotte forum to the Charlotte Coffee House. The Charlotte forum is more for building talk and such, while the coffee house is more for stuff like this.

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I am a white gay jew. From this minority's perspective Charlotte is relatively welcoming to diverse groups. There was a cover story in last year's creative loafing chronicling Charlotte's rising status as major draw for professional African Americans. The main thrust of the article focused on affluent black families in the suburbs. Charlotte has come a long way and still has a great distance to go like most cities. We are not even close to Atlanta's level as far as diversity acceptance and if you are looking for a more vibrant singles scene that may be a better fit from what I have observed at least.

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Because it was moved from the Charlotte forum to the Charlotte Coffee House. The Charlotte forum is more for building talk and such, while the coffee house is more for stuff like this.

Yes I moved it to the coffeehouse as this isn't specific to development in Charlotte. I left a link in the main forum so that others might find it. If you click on the Charlotte Coffee House, CherryPink, you will see the views and replys. (keep in mind that we only update the view counter every 6 hours now).

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This is a link to the afformentioned article from Creative Loafing on Af-Amer professionals moving to Charlotte. It's an interesting read with lots of factiods and stories from folks who made the move so you might be interested in reading it CherryPink.

The New Great Migration

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This is a link to the afformentioned article from Creative Loafing on Af-Amer professionals moving to Charlotte. It's an interesting read with lots of factiods and stories from folks who made the move so you might be interested in reading it CherryPink.

The New Great Migration

Thank you...this was a very good article.

Are there any blacks involved in ANY of the development taking place downtown???

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Thank you...this was a very good article.

Are there any blacks involved in ANY of the development taking place downtown???

Given that blacks were second class citizens not much more than a generation ago, I'm not too sure if too many of the blacks who went to college stuck around until recently. The people who have the money to be large scale developers are usually older with many years under their belt... I think it's interesting that Johnson, whose fortune came from BET, is involved down there. I assume he's from the area...

It's great that so many areas down there seem to be not so "old south" from a distant observer's viewpoint, mostly the cities... I took a road trip to Charleston a few years back and did come across a form of racism unheard of up here. On I95 on the way back there were a bunch of cars all in a row on the otherwise empty road going over 100 mph. There was a car with a confederate flag bumper sticker up front, a car with a couple of black guys, us, and then white people behind us (I know because we passed all three of them before pulling behind the black people). The cop singled out the black guy.

I'm white and from new england so feel free to correct me where I'm wrong.

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I think it's interesting that Johnson, whose fortune came from BET, is involved down there. I assume he's from the area...

I believe he's from DC. There are historic middle-class African-American neighborhoods in Charlotte like Biddleville which is next to Johnson C. Smith University. If someone is interested in learning more about them I would definitely advise seeking out the info. Now that Charlotte is playing host to the CIAA tournament I am sure its previous reputation as a hot spot for African American professionals will only grow stronger. As to Damus, getting to the heart of race relations in the area would take a loooong time but the opportunities for educating oneself here certainly abound.

Just a few more links

The local PBS affiliate created a documentary on African-American history in CLT. It lists the doc. as under production on the website however the doc. has already aired so I guess they've been slow in updating. A preview can be seen here but give it time to download (you'll need quicktime). It features many stories of great Charlotteans like Harvey Gantt who became Charlotte's first black mayorHometown Stories

As far as African-American involvement in Uptown building... I'm unsure of anything specific but the proposed new 3rd Ward park (what will be uptown's main park) is more than likely going to be named for Romaire Bearden.

The Afro-American cultural center is looking to increase its presence in uptown.

The Afro-American Cultural Center... The link is to their website but I specifically put it on the article that talks a little about their proposed new home in the Wachovia Cultural Campus uptown. It should be one of the top centers of its kind in the US after the move. It is currently uptown in a different location but has outgrown its current home.

Levine Museum of the New South The museums permanent exhibit highlights Charlotte's post civil war history which of course has highlights on race relations in many places. You can sit at a lunch counter and learn about sit-ins or in a back of a bus to learn about busing. Sit in a mock-up of a 1960's living room and watch the "I have a dream" speech. Some interesting stuff when it comes to the history of race relations in the Piedmont. It also regularly brings touring exhibits focusing on race relations such as the current exhibit "Oh freedom over me".

Some historic photos of the African American community in Charlotte. There are also scores of books on the subject.

Although Charlotte has developed quite a strong reputation for leveling all historic buildings, many of the buildings that are historic have been built by the African-American community over the last two centuries.

CherryPink, why not take a roadtrip, watch the documentary, visit a few of the places I listed, grab a couple of the books while you're down here, oh and most importantly, talk to the people down here. Odds are, you'll like it.

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Given that blacks were second class citizens not much more than a generation ago, I'm not too sure if too many of the blacks who went to college stuck around until recently.

I'm white and from new england so feel free to correct me where I'm wrong.

Ok, I will.

Charlotte has been consistantly 33% Black for the last several decades. That is significantly higher than that of New England. And even in Boston the population is 25% black and will would predict the suburbs there are much lower than that. There is a stereotype the South is still suffering from problems between the races, yet the evidence is that most of the severe problems are elsewhere. I will point out that during desegregation, some of the worst riots, beatings, and police actions against Blacks took place in the Boston school system.

We have a consolidated county wide school system (almost 600 sq miles) where Blacks and Whites (and any other race) attend schools all over the county. I have been told that something such as that would be simply impossible in the Boston area because the city still suffers from White flight because people don't want their kids in white schools. I don't know if it is the same throughout New England but I use Boston as the example as one would expect it to be the most "enlightened" in regards to race relations. I really don't know if this is true or not but given that Boston's city population continues to drop, I would say the evidence is there.

On the episode that you cited above, you do not know the reason the police pulled the people but you "assume" it was because the police here are racist. When you think about it, that is a form of prejudice against people living in the South because you "assume" that it must be that way there. Prejudice is the same regardless of whether you put the name racisim on it or not.

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Thank you...this was a very good article.

Are there any blacks involved in ANY of the development taking place downtown???

Bobby Drakeford has had several successful projects close to downtown and has almost sold out his current downtown project of single family homes. He developed M Street and now, Garden District Row and a few things in the Plaza area and the 3rd Ward/Morehead/Wesley Heights area as well. From what I understand, he's been very involved in a lot of civic groups/causes. Plus, he's very nice, and has shown sensitivity to neighborhood concerns about smart development.

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Given that blacks were second class citizens not much more than a generation ago, I'm not too sure if too many of the blacks who went to college stuck around until recently. The people who have the money to be large scale developers are usually older with many years under their belt... I think it's interesting that Johnson, whose fortune came from BET, is involved down there. I assume he's from the area...

It's great that so many areas down there seem to be not so "old south" from a distant observer's viewpoint, mostly the cities... I took a road trip to Charleston a few years back and did come across a form of racism unheard of up here. On I95 on the way back there were a bunch of cars all in a row on the otherwise empty road going over 100 mph. There was a car with a confederate flag bumper sticker up front, a car with a couple of black guys, us, and then white people behind us (I know because we passed all three of them before pulling behind the black people). The cop singled out the black guy.

I'm white and from new england so feel free to correct me where I'm wrong.

I believe racism is just as rampant, if not worse, in the northeast (where I'm from) than here, except up there it's more of an undercurrent, preventing blacks from advancing in politics, education, law, finance, etc. Hidden racism is just as bad as public racism. Some may argue it's worse, because you don't know who secretly hates you just because of your color. Up north, segregation of towns and within cities is painfully obvious. You can draw thick solid lines around voting districts. And whether true or not, Boston - in all it's self-proclaimed highly-educated "enlightened" glory - ironically has a reputation of being incredibly racist:

Has Boston shed its racist reputation?

You've cited a specific event and I will too. My girlfriend is black (I am white), and Boston was the only place where she's been called the "N" word to her face. And - perhaps surprisingly to some - being a mixed couple, we get far fewer looks and stares in Charlotte than we ever did in the northeast. Bottom line is, where there are people, there will be discrimination and hatred. Whether it be in Charleston or New England.

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