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skirby

UALR

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The Arkansas School for Math, Science, and the Arts had 121 graduates this spring. 21 of them will be heading to UALR with 18 of those planning to enroll in UALR's CyberCollege(College of Information Science and Systems Engineering). The 21 represents the most students going to any university in or out of state.

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The Arkansas School for Math, Science, and the Arts had 121 graduates this spring. 21 of them will be heading to UALR with 18 of those planning to enroll in UALR's CyberCollege(College of Information Science and Systems Engineering). The 21 represents the most students going to any university in or out of state.

Very interesting.

UALR's cybercollege has made great strides in recent years, even securing money the flagship campus wanted for nanotechnology.

I still say if UALR could ever separate from the UA, it would have a chance to turn into a competitive university.

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Anybody have ideas on enrollment figures at UALR?

I'm positive it's 3rd in Arkansas in enrollment figures behind ASU and UofA Fayetteville.

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Anybody have ideas on enrollment figures at UALR?

I'm positive it's 3rd in Arkansas in enrollment figures behind ASU and UofA Fayetteville.

You are right, except that it's third behind UA and UCA, not ASU.

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Ah that's right

UCA is going Division 1 next year, I should have known that.

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Very interesting.

UALR's cybercollege has made great strides in recent years, even securing money the flagship campus wanted for nanotechnology.

I still say if UALR could ever separate from the UA, it would have a chance to turn into a competitive university.

Boy, that's the truth. It should NEVER have agreed to be aligned with UA Fayetteville. The Board of Trustees for the UA system has kept the LR campus under their thumb for 30 years. What an unfortunate decision years ago.

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Boy, that's the truth. It should NEVER have agreed to be aligned with UA Fayetteville. The Board of Trustees for the UA system has kept the LR campus under their thumb for 30 years. What an unfortunate decision years ago.

I agree, UALR should've stayed LRU and remained independent. Another thing that might've strengthened it would've been having the med school campus as a subsidiary of that university the way UAB in Birmingham is.

I wonder if this is the reason UCA has passed UALR in recent years in academic standing. UCA seems to be a school of growing importance, enrollment, stature, and aspirations.

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I agree, UALR should've stayed LRU and remained independent. Another thing that might've strengthened it would've been having the med school campus as a subsidiary of that university the way UAB in Birmingham is.

I wonder if this is the reason UCA has passed UALR in recent years in academic standing. UCA seems to be a school of growing importance, enrollment, stature, and aspirations.

Yes, I would agree about UCA. I think that has a lot to do with the large population base of the LR market who want to "go away" for college rather than go to the "local" school, but don't feel compelled to drive 200 miles to Fayetteville. And honestly, with the exception of a few stellar programs AND due to Chancellor White's emphasis on academics, recent history didn't give much reason to go to UAF at all save for athletics and partying. And yes, I can say that; I'm a graduate.

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Yes, I would agree about UCA. I think that has a lot to do with the large population base of the LR market who want to "go away" for college rather than go to the "local" school, but don't feel compelled to drive 200 miles to Fayetteville. And honestly, with the exception of a few stellar programs AND due to Chancellor White's emphasis on academics, recent history didn't give much reason to go to UAF at all save for athletics and partying. And yes, I can say that; I'm a graduate.

Of course, your major would be one of, it not THE, most notable exception.

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Is the School of Architecture at UA Fayetteville the only Architecture school in the state? If so that is a shame, Little Rock is by far the most urban city in the state. UALR needs to look into fields such as Architecture to make it more selective in the future.

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Is the School of Architecture at UA Fayetteville the only Architecture school in the state? If so that is a shame, Little Rock is by far the most urban city in the state. UALR needs to look into fields such as Architecture to make it more selective in the future.

Yes it is, and it is an exceptional school - one of the finest around. There are only about 99 schools of architecture in the country, as it is a fairly small profession. As such, there would be no reason for the state to support two schools. States that have more than one program, like Oklahoma (2) and Louisiana (5. Yes 5.) are arguably not as well respected as the program at UA.

One could debate whether or not it should be in LR or Fayetteville, but not two schools. Honestly, the program is quite broad in its national and international exposure for the student - so even though I'm from LR, I couldn't argue that there would be any advantage for it being located here.

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Yes it is, and it is an exceptional school - one of the finest around. There are only about 99 schools of architecture in the country, as it is a fairly small profession. As such, there would be no reason for the state to support two schools. States that have more than one program, like Oklahoma (2) and Louisiana (5. Yes 5.) are arguably not as well respected as the program at UA.

One could debate whether or not it should be in LR or Fayetteville, but not two schools. Honestly, the program is quite broad in its national and international exposure for the student - so even though I'm from LR, I couldn't argue that there would be any advantage for it being located here.

My brother is a UA architecture grad as well, he now lives in NWA.

Architecture is the sort of profession where there's little to be gained by adding new schools and churning out lots of mediocre graduates. It's better to have one good school that turns out quality architects capable of setting up local firms with regional and national reputations than to have to rely on out-of-state firms because of a lack of local talent.

In any case, architects gravitate to more urban areas like ants to a picnic. The same reasons they went into the profession generally bend them that way. Little Rock has an ample number of architects for a city this size, at least it always seemed that way to me.

There are a few things that are silly to duplicate in a state this size and I think it's reasonable for the UA to have the only architecture school, UCA the only physical therapy school, and UAMS the only medical school.

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Actually, according to last year's figures it's UA, UALR, UCA, then ASU according to Spring 2006 enrollment figures

Anybody have ideas on enrollment figures at UALR?

I'm positive it's 3rd in Arkansas in enrollment figures behind ASU and UofA Fayetteville.

Actually, according to last year's figures it's UA, UALR, UCA, then ASU according to Spring 2006 enrollment figures

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Actually, according to last year's figures it's UA, UALR, UCA, then ASU according to Spring 2006 enrollment figures

Actually, according to last year's figures it's UA, UALR, UCA, then ASU according to Spring 2006 enrollment figures

I work at UALR. That Spring 2006 ranking is accurate. There is no doubt that UCA has developed rapidly in the past 10 years. I get the sense that the administration believes that UCA will eclipse UALR enrollment this fall.

In addition to competition from UCA, Pulaski Tech is a big reason for keeping UALR enrollment numbers from growing. "In 1992 Pulaski Tech enrolled 850 students. In 2004 it enrolled 7,222 students."

Notwithstanding enrollment statistics, UALR has a lot going for it today and a lot more in the hopper. Many of the previous post about UALR seemed to come from the uniformed and those who are playing/listening to old tapes. Getting people to change their opinion of this institution is difficult.

The former Chancellor Charles Hathaway started UALR down a very positive path. He steered UALR into the mold of a metropolitan university. Some of you will claim that UALR has always been a metropolitan university. It is not true. For many years, UALR did not have as clear an identity as it does today. You can see the operative definition and description of a metropolitan university at http://www.ualr.edu/chancellor/metropolitan.asp. The current Chancellor, Joel Anderson is doing an excellent job in continuing this mission. It is articulated in the stratgic plan. http://www.ualr.edu/strategicplan/

For those of you who prefer to look at plans/drawings instead of reading an articulated vision, stay tune for the posting of the UALR master plan and University District plan. http://www.ualr.edu/chancellor/fastforward.asp

If I were a betting man (I pick Steppenwolfer to win the Belmont.), I would bet that the University & Asher/Col Glen corridor will see a rebirth in the next 20 years. Oh, did I mention that UALR has a lot in the hopper?

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If I were a betting man (I pick Steppenwolfer to win the Belmont.), I would bet that the University & Asher/Col Glen corridor will see a rebirth in the next 20 years. Oh, did I mention that UALR has a lot in the hopper?

I don't know if the Asher/University area will ever recover and become what it once was but if it did it will be solely because of UALR.

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Officials of FTN Associates, a water resources environmental consultant firm, are donating $135,000 to UALR in the form of 1,500 hours of voluntary service to help jump start the University

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There should be a redevelopment announcement coming soon for the Coleman Dairy site. A 600+ bed apt complex and perhaps some soft retail.

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There should be a redevelopment announcement coming soon for the Coleman Dairy site. A 600+ bed apt complex and perhaps some soft retail.

I never thought we'd see "redevelopment" on Asher. I would love to see UALR and the city make a priority of cleaning up University and Asher's intersection and boosting the unblighted but underdeveloped intersection at University and 12th.

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I never thought we'd see "redevelopment" on Asher. I would love to see UALR and the city make a priority of cleaning up University and Asher's intersection and boosting the unblighted but underdeveloped intersection at University and 12th.

One of the busiest intersections in the city and there has been little to no developent there. I know demographics play a part and that its not the richest part of town, but developers need to realize that the people that live in the area have money to spend and go to other areas of the city to purchase goods. But because that is a poorer area no one wants to invest in it. It would be really sad to see Asher and University if UALR wasn't there.

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One of the busiest intersections in the city and there has been little to no developent there. I know demographics play a part and that its not the richest part of town, but developers need to realize that the people that live in the area have money to spend and go to other areas of the city to purchase goods. But because that is a poorer area no one wants to invest in it. It would be really sad to see Asher and University if UALR wasn't there.

If not for UALR the city south of 630 would largely have been abandoned by the middle class. There are still areas clustered around university that are pretty nice, Western Hills, the Boyle Park area, Fair Park between 12th and UALR, etc and I attribute this all to UALR.

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If not for UALR the city south of 630 would largely have been abandoned by the middle class. There are still areas clustered around university that are pretty nice, Western Hills, the Boyle Park area, Fair Park between 12th and UALR, etc and I attribute this all to UALR.

I agree. Because of UALR, that part of the city is not completely lost. There are still hard working middle income residents in the area that need restaurants and retail that other parts of the city have.

I was glad to see that when Catfish City burned a couple of years ago, they decided to rebuild at the site and not move from the area. The new strip center with Senor Tequila is a welcomed addition to the area as well, but outside of that there has not been much development in the area outside of UALR.

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I agree. Because of UALR, that part of the city is not completely lost. There are still hard working middle income residents in the area that need restaurants and retail that other parts of the city have.

I was glad to see that when Catfish City burned a couple of years ago, they decided to rebuild at the site and not move from the area. The new strip center with Senor Tequila is a welcomed addition to the area as well, but outside of that there has not been much development in the area outside of UALR.

I hope Stodola puts the planned (or at least hoped for) new midtown police station down around 12th and University. I think that would really make the area feel safer for the residents and thwart crime in the area, or just as importantly, the perception of crime.

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From Arkansas Business.com... http://www.arkansasbusiness.com/article.as...10.10416.109155

UALR Workshop to Discuss Neighborhood Planning

The University of Arkansas at Little Rock will conduct a community workshop at 7 p.m. Thursday to discuss efforts to improve and develop its surrounding neighborhood.

The workshop, which takes place at the Bailey Alumni Center at 28th Street and Campus Drive West, was originally scheduled for Jan. 31 but rescheduled due to inclement weather.

Ron Copeland, director of the University District Partnership, will coordinate the workshop. The partnership has hired an urban planning firm to come up with ideas for the area from Interstate 630 on the north to Fourche Creek on the south and from Monroe Street on the east to Boyle Park on the west.

Residents and business owners in the area are invited to see a presentation from the consultants on how the district can change, including streets, schools, pedestrian walkways and transit links. The presentation will be followed by round table discussions, questions and feedback, the partnership said.

Planning and other documents related to the district are available here. (http://www.ualr.edu/communityengagement/universitydistrict.asp)

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And then there's this from Arkansas Business.com as well... http://www.arkansasbusiness.com/article.as...10.98916.109155

UALR Workshop to Discuss Neighborhood Planning

The University of Arkansas at Little Rock will conduct a community workshop at 7 p.m. Thursday to discuss efforts to improve and develop its surrounding neighborhood.

The workshop, which takes place at the Bailey Alumni Center at 28th Street and Campus Drive West, was originally scheduled for Jan. 31 but rescheduled due to inclement weather.

Ron Copeland, director of the University District Partnership, will coordinate the workshop. The partnership has hired an urban planning firm to come up with ideas for the area from Interstate 630 on the north to Fourche Creek on the south and from Monroe Street on the east to Boyle Park on the west.

Residents and business owners in the area are invited to see a presentation from the consultants on how the district can change, including streets, schools, pedestrian walkways and transit links. The presentation will be followed by round table discussions, questions and feedback, the partnership said.

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