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Economic Development in South Carolina


Skyliner

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Our economy is clearly getting better, which is encouraging. I think it is also important to remember that our state is growing faster than most other states. Despite the creation of new jobs, it is still difficult to make a large dent in unemployment when the workforce is being added to at a high rate. When you add the mill closings and loss of textile jobs to that, you can see that we have had a lot to overcome. I know people like to focus on the high unemployment rate, and while it is a concern, it is bound to come down over time. After all, we are repositioning ourselves as a state of high-tech, knowledge-based industry. Such a transformation from traditional blue collar jobs to progressive, sustainable business cannot occur overnight. This type of business should allow people in all income brackets opportunities to build a career (rather than merely "holding a job").

Edited by Greenville
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Giving a huge property tax break in exchange for an increase in the Sales Tax will only widen the gap, IMO. The political power in this state has always been concentrated in the big cities, specifically Greenville and Charleston. Their senators and representatives seem oblivious to the problems in places like Orangeburg, Marlboro, and Union counties.

The sales tax option is a horirble way to go. I think SC will suffer from that switchover in some way.

The rural areas have always dominated SC politics, and still do to some extent. That is why we have such backwards annexation laws, among other things. The cities are slowly gaining more influence, which is why you see some proposals to alter the annexation laws (even though they tend to get put on a shelf somewhere). The problem is that rural politicians are the most oblivious to the problems at the state level.

I think the problems facing rural counties lie in the national trend of urbanization. Small towns these days just don't offer the same amenities that people want, and that businesses look for when locating somewhere. The small towns that do well are typically near larger cities. I am certain you can find some exceptions to the rule, but generally this is the case. The rural life style is just not as appealing to people any more. Unfortunately that means that suburbs are. People want to live in the "country" so long as that means a "subdivision" with farmland or forest around them.

Our economy is clearly getting better, which is encouraging. I think it is also important to remember that our state is growing faster than most other states. Despite the creation of new jobs, it is still difficult to make a large dent in unemployment when the workforce is being added to at a high rate. When you add the mill closings and loss of textile jobs to that, you can see that we have had a lot to overcome. I know people like to focus on the high unemployment rate, and while it is a concern, it is bound to come down over time. After all, we are repositioning ourselves as a state of high-tech, knowledge-based industry. Such a transformation from traditional blue collar jobs to progressive, sustainable business cannot occur overnight. This type of business should allow people in all income brackets opportunities to build a career (rather than merely "holding a job").

What I find interesting is that it seems like most of the jobs being created are not kowledge based jobs. They are industry/manufacturing jobs. So that doesn't explain the disconnect to me.

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I think the underlying cause is that many new jobs being created in the state are being filled by newcomers to the state. While the number of jobs may not necessarily increasing, I'm guessing that the aggregate income of jobs gained versus jobs lost is increasing. As a result, all these newcomers to the market are boosting the big tax revenue streams (sales, real estate, development, capital investments, etc.) But the in-migration of labor is doing little to help the unemployment rate.

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Two South Carolina MSA's are ranked in Forbes's current issue in their list of the best 100 cities in which to find a job. Columbia is ranked #63 and Greenville is ranked #91. We're starting to wake up in the Palmetto State. We had fallen off in the last couple of rankings.

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Two South Carolina MSA's are ranked in Forbes's current issue in their list of the best 100 cities in which to find a job. Columbia is ranked #63 and Greenville is ranked #91. We're starting to wake up in the Palmetto State. We had fallen off in the last couple of rankings.

COOL. Thanks for sharing! :shades:

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Two South Carolina MSA's are ranked in Forbes's current issue in their list of the best 100 cities in which to find a job. Columbia is ranked #63 and Greenville is ranked #91. We're starting to wake up in the Palmetto State. We had fallen off in the last couple of rankings.

Is that from the Best Places for Business list?

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Is that from the Best Places for Business list?

No, it's from their July 19th list of the 100 best cities to get a job. Go to their website and key in 'best cities' in the search box (since I still don't know how to create a link here) and the 100 best cities to get a job list will come up among a couple of other lists. WIS News mentioned Columbia's ranking last night on the news so I looked it up today.

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  • 3 weeks later...

INC Engineered Materials, an Australia-based company that specializes in acoustic insulation products, is locating its first U.S. facility in Lexington, S.C. The company has initially invested almost $2.5 million that will create 10 new jobs with the opening of a 60,000 square foot manufacturing facility at Columbia Metropolitan Airport Park.

We all know about Hubbell Lighting's HQs in Greenville, but here is an article about it in Expansion Management. Good write-up.

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New figures show South Carolina lost over 1000 auto supplier manufacturing jobs last year. Officials are hoping the new Clemson automotive research site in Greenville will help offset some of these types of losses. They attribute the downturn to less expensive overseas opportunities for companies making auto parts.

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New figures show South Carolina lost over 1000 auto supplier manufacturing jobs last year. Officials are hoping the new Clemson automotive research site in Greenville will help offset some of these types of losses. They attribute the downturn to less expensive overseas opportunities for companies making auto parts.

Here's the story: http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/mld/myrtl...ne/15333321.htm

Edited by carolinadude9409
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  • 2 weeks later...

:yahoo: According to the Greenville News: Project John is in the works for Pickens County. It's estimating to create 280 medium to high-paying jobs for the upstate. It's still in the early stages, as nothing is definite yet and incentives haven't been approved. This should be a nice boost for Pickens County and the Greenville Metro.

I saw this earlier on the web, but I can't put my finger on it now... so, sorry for not having a link.

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Apparently, this is Project John:

St. Jude Medical Inc. will add 300 jobs to its Pickens operations by 2008, opening a microelectric facility beside its capacitor division.

The new plant will make circuitry for medical devices that are implanted in humans. Construction on the 60,000-square-foot facility will begin this year, said Ray Farley, executive director of Alliance Pickens economic development group.

The move will double the company

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Plant Closing in Marion County will cost 140 jobs

Poor Marion County has had it rough the last ten years. I'm being to wonder if there is any plants left there. They will stay in double digits (unemployment) for awhile yet it seems.

The divide between haves and have-nots seems to be growing in this state.

Edited by vicupstate
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I saw that too. Marion and Marion county are pretty slow places like most of the Pee Dee area between Florence and Horry counties. This no doubt will hit them pretty hard. I assume a lot of them will make the long drive to go and work in Myrtle Beach. A considerable number of people travel to Myrtle Beach now from as far away as Hartsville to work jobs there. I think most of the economy outside of textiles centers around farming.

I think the day is coming where there will be no more cotton mills in SC and every city that depends upon them ought to be looking at how they can adapt to this as soon as possible. No doubt this is probably a good thing given how the textile mills have basically exploited people of SC over the decades with bad working conditions and low pay, but the transition will be difficult. Small towns like Marion may simply cease to exist over time.

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