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gs3

America's only tea plantation in Charleston

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Yep, it is cool how the city possesses so many different things which no other city has. Though I really don't like tea, this would be a great place to check out when visiting.

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The tea farm is a really wonderful place. I'm fortunate that my dad was the chief horticulturalist there when it was a Lipton research farm. I spent quite a few weekends and summers out there when I was a kid. It's a shame that Mack Fleming had to auction off the farm a few years ago (he was the general manager under Lipton, and later bought it when Lipton decided to downsize its R&D program), but I'm very glad that Bigelow bought it and is running it as a functioning tea farm. I'd definitely recommend taking a tour out there. It's a truly unique piece of the Lowcountry.

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^ Thanks for the info! Next time I'm in Charleston, definitely want to check it out. Is there a better time of year to visit? Spring? Summer? Fall?

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^ Thanks for the info! Next time I'm in Charleston, definitely want to check it out. Is there a better time of year to visit? Spring? Summer? Fall?

Well, tea is a member of the camelia family, so they harvest the leaves in the spring. A few weeks prior to the harvest, they prune away the buds of the plants, which is also a time of great activity. I'm thinking if you want to see the farm in actual operation, either of these times would be a good time to go. I'm not sure what the exact dates would be, but I'm guessing the pruning would be in late March, and the harvest in mid-April. I'm sure the people at Bigelow could tell you more specifically. Hope this helps.

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Yep, it is cool how the city possesses so many different things which no other city has. Though I really don't like tea, this would be a great place to check out when visiting.

How can you be from the South, one of the cradles of Southern culture at that, and not like tea? :angry::D:P

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Well, tea is a member of the camelia family, so they harvest the leaves in the spring. A few weeks prior to the harvest, they prune away the buds of the plants, which is also a time of great activity. I'm thinking if you want to see the farm in actual operation, either of these times would be a good time to go. I'm not sure what the exact dates would be, but I'm guessing the pruning would be in late March, and the harvest in mid-April. I'm sure the people at Bigelow could tell you more specifically. Hope this helps.

Thanks Isgchas! :thumbsup::thumbsup:

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How can you be from the South, one of the cradles of Southern culture at that, and not like tea?...

:lol: Ummm...there's a Yankee somewhere in my family tree? :D I don't know, my parents tried to get me to like tea when I was little, and I never liked it. Even when I went to family reunions is St. George, I would only drink water or soda. Call me different, I guess! ;)

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Nothing beats a cold class of sweet tea on a hot summer day ;)

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Nothing beats a cold class of sweet tea on a hot summer day ;)

Actually, an ice-cold glass of lemonade would...IMO, of course! :D

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For years American Classic tea was all I bought for making ice tea, but then it became hard to find, now I know why. I hope they can get it back in the stores.

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