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krazeeboi

We have GOT to get it together!

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A study by Education Week magazine ranks SC #50 in students who fail to earn a HS diploma four years later.

To be fair, there seems to be fluctuations in how this is determined. However, something is desparately wrong in this state and it needs to be fixed. SC's fact sheet can be found here (PDF file). I had no idea the percentage of students in our public schools in poverty was at 49.7 percent! And the rate we were given was 52.5 (compared with the national average of 69.6). Anybody see a correlation? It's a true blue catch-22 in this state. :cry:

Speaking of which, what are you guys' thoughts on the candidates for Superintendent of Education?

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I think a lot of this starts in the home as there is a climate being created these days that an education isn't important. There is a general disdain in this country for anyone to learn math and science, and instead we glorify sports stars and american idol contestants. i.e. instant fame and glory over success by hard work and time.

I think this number is a lot worse than it was when I graduated from a SC high school in the 1970s, when, during a brief period of time between segregation and later social polarization, schooling was a community responsibility. And everyone in the community went to school or they got their ass whipped. It didn't matter who you were, what color you were, or what family you came from.

This report probably does not include the people that later go and get a GED once they learn thier mistake, but the number is a horrible indictment of not only our schools, but our society in general where getting an education is not being stressed as being important.

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Yeah I just graduated from Columbia High in 2004...In 2000 we started with about 350 freshman....By the time senior year came about 180 graduated...That usually happens with every other class...By the time senior year is around the class drops by nearly half there

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A study by Education Week magazine ranks SC #50 in students who fail to earn a HS diploma four years later.

To be fair, there seems to be fluctuations in how this is determined. However, something is desparately wrong in this state and it needs to be fixed. SC's fact sheet can be found here (PDF file). I had no idea the percentage of students in our public schools in poverty was at 49.7 percent! And the rate we were given was 52.5 (compared with the national average of 69.6). Anybody see a correlation? It's a true blue catch-22 in this state. :cry:

Speaking of which, what are you guys' thoughts on the candidates for Superintendent of Education?

Krazee, I was reading this article in the paper and thinking to myself that u were going to post a topic about it on UP. LOL. I know u so well man.

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Speaking of which, what are you guys' thoughts on the candidates for Superintendent of Education?

I honestly haven't payed it much attention. I know that Karen Floyd from Spartanburg won the republican primary. Who is on the democrat side? Inez?

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HAMMETTM, have I become that predictable? LOL

Inez isn't running again; if she was, I'd probably vote for her. The other candidates are Jim Rex (D) from Winnsboro and Tim Moultrie, a Libertarian from Lexington.

I would like to see community-based organizations really begin to step it up in our local communities. We know that the drop-out rates will be highest in poor and rural communities, so those are the areas we need to really target.

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Karen Floyd will probably win anyway. I have gone back and forth on my opinion of about the school choise issue, which is a major platform of hers (she's for it).

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Yeah, Floyd is really the only one I've been hearing about. I have my research cut out for me come November.

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I think a lot of this starts in the home as there is a climate being created these days that an education isn't important. There is a general disdain in this country for anyone to learn math and science, and instead we glorify sports stars and american idol contestants. i.e. instant fame and glory over success by hard work and time.

I think this number is a lot worse than it was when I graduated from a SC high school in the 1970s, when, during a brief period of time between segregation and later social polarization, schooling was a community responsibility. And everyone in the community went to school or they got their ass whipped. It didn't matter who you were, what color you were, or what family you came from.

This report probably does not include the people that later go and get a GED once they learn thier mistake, but the number is a horrible indictment of not only our schools, but our society in general where getting an education is not being stressed as being important.

Metro.m hit this one on the head perfectly. In this state, as with the whole nation, we've got to get the focus where it ought to be, and that must start in the home. I am sick of the lazy asses we've got who think they'll just mooch off of the government and wait until one of their children signs a multi-million-dollar contract with a pro sports franchise or well-known record company - instead of taking time everyday to instruct by example what is really important in life.

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Karen Floyd will probably win anyway. I have gone back and forth on my opinion of about the school choise issue, which is a major platform of hers (she's for it).

I hope she doesn't win because of her stance on school choice. Public education needs work, but taking money out of public schools isn't going to help. I would imagine that in the places that need the help the most that private schools are few and far between and more inconveinient than they are worth... But yea, if she's from spartanburg or any other metro for that matter (Charleston-- Sanford) then sure private school is a great choice and the money to pay for it would be great... :sick: I'd like to talk to her one on one and really understand her platform more greatly.

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People do pay good money to make sure their children have the best education possible. I personally know a few people who have sacrificed their personal financial freedom for their kids' future because they understand how important the right foundational skills are. I commend many of our private schools for their high standards and excellent educational achievement. :thumbsup:

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Personally, I would prefer to home-school my children (when I have some).

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Another excellent option for those qualified and eager enough to take on the responsibility. ;)

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If I ever have children, I will be sending them to private school. Unfortunately, that is not a commentary on SC's public schools, but public schools across our country.

I agree about the importance of parenting. Schools are expected to fix bad parenting, yet teachers are not given the respect they once were. I have a couple of close friends who recently graduated from college and started teaching in public schools, and you would not believe some of their stories. One is in Los Angeles, and the other is in Greensboro. Both have dealt with kids who have absolutely no respect for the teachers or the school. Many parents are either not involved, or do not support the teacher in disciplining their child. What's worse is that some school and county administrations expect teachers to overcome these barriers. It seems to me that even the best educator is going to have a difficult time getting through to a child when the parent/parents are not fully on board.

On top of that, Bush's "No Child Left Behind" program sounds wonderful and compassionate on paper, but in reality it is really straining the school system. If you look at the stringent regulations in place surrounding that program, you will likely realize how little sense it makes.

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All public schools are not bad everyone. I'm a product of the public school system and view myself as successful. It's all in how you do your research and find the right public school for your child. However, first and foremost, it's how the child is reared at home that will determine the final product IMO.

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Very true, HAMMETTM. I, too, am a product of the state's public education system, and I believe I received a quality education. And I attended high school in a town of ~1,000 residents.

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Perhaps if a study was made to see how many students (K thru 12) are home alone during the work week, it could explain why the state has such a low ranking.

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I doubt it. Some families can't afford to have a stay at home parent. The problem is not unique to SC, just more evident.

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Southern culture is a celebration of ignorance.

A study by Education Week magazine ranks SC #50 in students who fail to earn a HS diploma four years later.

To be fair, there seems to be fluctuations in how this is determined. However, something is desparately wrong in this state and it needs to be fixed. SC's fact sheet can be found here (PDF file). I had no idea the percentage of students in our public schools in poverty was at 49.7 percent! And the rate we were given was 52.5 (compared with the national average of 69.6). Anybody see a correlation? It's a true blue catch-22 in this state. :cry:

Speaking of which, what are you guys' thoughts on the candidates for Superintendent of Education?

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Southern culture is a celebration of ignorance.

:blink: What?

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On top of that, Bush's "No Child Left Behind" program sounds wonderful and compassionate on paper, but in reality it is really straining the school system. If you look at the stringent regulations in place surrounding that program, you will likely realize how little sense it makes.

This is somewhat related to the other thread on SC's stringent education standards, but it is worth noting that when the "No Child Left Behind" was initially started in Houston, it was credited with making tremendous strides in graduation rates. It turned out that the successes were fraudulent (students who dropped out were removed from consideration in graduation rates). But it does come back to the idea that there could be other factors in play here.

That's not to say the SC education system is good. But just that until we have some kind of national standards and criteria upon which all schools are judged, and those assessments are not measured internally, it is difficult to say with any precision that we are #50... and not #49... or #45... or #40.

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Southern culture is a celebration of ignorance.

:huh::blink::wacko:<_<

Explanation?

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I posted a video in the coffee house this thread that talks about the sad state of the education system in the USA today. Since SC efforts in this area are mentioned a number of times, I thought I would post a link here. It's a long video, but well worth watching.

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Indeed it was. That video makes a good case for school choice, but I think it unfairly represented South Carolina's schools.

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A study by Education Week magazine ranks SC #50 in students who fail to earn a HS diploma four years later.

To be fair, there seems to be fluctuations in how this is determined. However, something is desparately wrong in this state and it needs to be fixed. SC's fact sheet can be found here (PDF file). I had no idea the percentage of students in our public schools in poverty was at 49.7 percent! And the rate we were given was 52.5 (compared with the national average of 69.6). Anybody see a correlation? It's a true blue catch-22 in this state. :cry:

Speaking of which, what are you guys' thoughts on the candidates for Superintendent of Education?

Where did you go to find the kids that get free lunches? I clicked and it said nothing found.

Metro.m hit this one on the head perfectly. In this state, as with the whole nation, we've got to get the focus where it ought to be, and that must start in the home. I am sick of the lazy asses we've got who think they'll just mooch off of the government and wait until one of their children signs a multi-million-dollar contract with a pro sports franchise or well-known record company - instead of taking time everyday to instruct by example what is really important in life.

I agree 110% I have also said this in another forum

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