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kayman

Birmingham Metro Population Growth

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http://www.al.com/news/birminghamnews/inde....xml&coll=2

The US Census Bureau has just released 2005 numbers for the Birmingham-Hoover Metropoltian Area. It shows that Shelby County has surpassed Tuscaloosa County as the 5th largest in the state. Shelby has grown 28,172 since 2000, while St. Clair has grown 7,588. However, Jefferson and Walker counties have lost population (4,896 and 596) over the last 4 years.

But it also shows that Shelby County has a lot of growing infastructure problems such as transportation. There is now a promotional campaign that is being air on local television and radio stations discussing these problems sponsored by the Shelby County Chamber of Commerce. There are basically pushing the state legislature to allow the county to possess full home rule over everything from taxes, transporatation, and zoning.

Birmingham's sprawl is just beginning, just imagine how sprawled out it will be in the next 10 years. -_- I believe the Jefferson and Walker counties population lost are temporary with McCalla, Trussville, Gardendale/Fultondale growing and the I-22 corridor being built, those areas will bounce back when the official #s come out in 2010.

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I'm surprised that Walker County has lost population. I've never been there, but it seems like an ideal location for growth, especially with a new interstate being completed through the county by 2008.

I don't see Jefferson County having a large population "growth spurt" anytime soon. Nor do I see it losing a lot of residents either. The population of Jeffco will probably remain about the same until 2010, then will experience slow growth (about .1-.5% per yr) afterwards.

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I'm surprised that Walker County has lost population. I've never been there, but it seems like an ideal location for growth, especially with a new interstate being completed through the county by 2008.

I don't see Jefferson County having a large population "growth spurt" anytime soon. Nor do I see it losing a lot of residents either. The population of Jeffco will probably remain about the same until 2010, then will experience slow growth (about .1-.5% per yr) afterwards.

There is a lot of undeveloped land in the northern portion of Jefferson County. Also areas such as Gardendale, Center Point, Pinson, Fultondale, Warrior, Kimberly, Morris, Graysville, and Adamsville are going to experience explosive growth because of the Northern Beltline. Believe me urban sprawl is going to happen there as well. Jefferson County will most likely hit 700,000 by 2020 because of this.

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I'm surprised that Walker County has lost population. I've never been there, but it seems like an ideal location for growth, especially with a new interstate being completed through the county by 2008.

Recently there has been some industries that have located to the industrial park in Jasper due to its proximity to I-22. I suspect the population loss that Walker County has experienced has been due to a lack of good jobs in the area. I think this trend is changing, especially as I-22 is completed to Birmingham.

There have been a couple of subdivisions that have popped up around Jasper and Sumiton, but it has not been anything explosive by any means.

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                                  2000       2005        Change

--------- --------- ------ ----

Bibb County 20,826 21,516 690 3.3%

Blount County 51,024 55,725 4,701 9.2%

Chilton County 39,593 41,744 2,151 5.4%

Jefferson County 662,047 657,229 -4,818 -0.7%

St. Clair County 64,742 72,330 7,588 11.7%

Shelby County 143,293 171,465 28,172 19.7%

Walker County 70,713 70,117 -596 -0.8%

Cullman County 77,483 79,886 2,403 3.1%

Birmingham-Hoover-Cullman CSA 1,129,721 1,170,012 40,291 3.6%

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                                  2000       2005        Change

--------- --------- ------ ----

Bibb County 20,826 21,516 690 3.3%

Blount County 51,024 55,725 4,701 9.2%

Chilton County 39,593 41,744 2,151 5.4%

Jefferson County 662,047 657,229 -4,818 -0.7%

St. Clair County 64,742 72,330 7,588 11.7%

Shelby County 143,293 171,465 28,172 19.7%

Walker County 70,713 70,117 -596 -0.8%

Cullman County 77,483 79,886 2,403 3.1%

Birmingham-Hoover-Cullman CSA 1,129,721 1,170,012 40,291 3.6%

It is hard for me to believe that Jefferson County has had any decline in population in the last five years especially considering the amount of development in the McCalla and Trussville areas. Is anyone as suprised as I am to see a decline?

Looking at Shelby County's increase it is clear that the state is going to have to make a move soon to do something to the highways (I65, 31 and 280) soon. Does anyone know of any serious plans for improvements on any of these highways?

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It is hard for me to believe that Jefferson County has had any decline in population in the last five years especially considering the amount of development in the McCalla and Trussville areas. Is anyone as suprised as I am to see a decline?

Looking at Shelby County's increase it is clear that the state is going to have to make a move soon to do something to the highways (I65, 31 and 280) soon. Does anyone know of any serious plans for improvements on any of these highways?

They're repaving 280 from 459 north, and doing an intersection realignment at Green Valley and Rocky Ridge.

Not like that's gonna do much besides cut down on transit time by a minute or two.

Otherwise, everything else is still up in the air.

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They're repaving 280 from 459 north, and doing an intersection realignment at Green Valley and Rocky Ridge.

Not like that's gonna do much besides cut down on transit time by a minute or two.

Otherwise, everything else is still up in the air.

Two traffic signals are about to go up at US 280 and Shelby CR 41 and CR 43.

Improvements to the US 280/I-459 interchange should continue...flyover ramps will soon be constructedto eliminate all traffic signals in the interchange, although the contracts to contruct each flyover will be issued one at a time, and none of them have been let yet.

I-65 is expected to be widened south to Calera, but there is no indication when that work will begin.

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Census statistics cite 3 area cities for fast growth

According to the US Census Bureau, Pelham 35%, Moody 34%, & Helena 29% are the 3 fastest growing cities in the Birmingham-Hoover metro area between April '00 - July '05. The all 3 of them are in the Top 5 fastest growing cities in the state.

Birmingham's Population Loss

However, Birmingham is also the fastest shrinking are Birmingham, Fairfield, Bessemer, & Homewood. Birmingham has lost another 11,162 residents (4.6%) from its city. :unsure: This is sad to see Birmingham continue to withe as the metropolitan area has grown by nearly 50,000 in the last 5 years. I hope that new BBOE superintendent will turn the schools systems environment around like he has done for Bronx and East St. Louis, IL. Also, I hope the city can stem its increasing crime problem and get that mess under control. Then maybe, just maybe, combined with the downtown renewal will Birmingham possibly turn around its mass exodus.

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Just to clarify for people that may be reading... that's 11,000 since 2000... not a decline of 11,000 in just one year. It is indeed sad, but I doubt it's actually true. I believe that was the trend before. But there's too much going on right now for that. Probably arent really gaining, but no way we're losing 2,000+ per year anymore.

Pelham, Trussville, Helena, Moody, Gardendale, etc. are really the places to live right now. And I'm fine with that as long as Birmingham maintains where it is or even gains population. I dont like to see suburbs grow at the EXPENSE of a large city.

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Just to clarify for people that may be reading... that's 11,000 since 2000... not a decline of 11,000 in just one year. It is indeed sad, but I doubt it's actually true. I believe that was the trend before. But there's too much going on right now for that. Probably arent really gaining, but no way we're losing 2,000+ per year anymore.

Pelham, Trussville, Helena, Moody, Gardendale, etc. are really the places to live right now. And I'm fine with that as long as Birmingham maintains where it is or even gains population. I dont like to see suburbs grow at the EXPENSE of a large city.

Amen to that.

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One unofficial estimate is that the number of Latino residents in Alabama (both legal and illegal) will be about 250,000 in 2010.

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you can fight it or welcome it - but i think we'd have to be idiots not to welcome it. you can't stop the inevitable, but you can shape the way it affects what's already here.

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I think it's good for Birmingham and Alabama. Shows we're not a state entirely filled with bigots and also showcases a bit of Alabama's diversity. Good for the economy, good for our image.

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completely agree. i've found that people here are about as bigoted as they are everywhere else - but not any worse. i'm living in arizona now, and there is plenty of hostility towards immigrants. the phoenix area is really bad. you'd think you were in the south, the way the sheriff grandstands and holds press conferences every time there's an arrest. alabama can actually look good relative to other areas of the country if we'll just embrace the influx of new people - most of whom have a terrific work ethic and a desire to fit in.

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you can fight it or welcome it - but i think we'd have to be idiots not to welcome it. you can't stop the inevitable, but you can shape the way it affects what's already here.

Nothing wrong with welcoming legal immigrants. But welcoming an illegal invasion...

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Based on the July 1, 2007 population estimates...

Birmingham MSA (Jefferson, Shelby, St. Clair, Walker, Blount, Chilton, and Bibb) = 1,108,210

That's an increase of about 8,000-9,000 folks since July of 2006.

Birmingham CSA (Jefferson, Shelby, Cullman, St. Clair, Walker, Blount, Chilton, and Bibb) = 1,188,764

Nothing too spectacular in the numbers, but the region does at least continue to grow gradually. Birmingham is really in need of something big to help to population really take off. Of course, given the downturn in the economy nationwide, alot of areas are really struggling right now. Hopefully that will end very soon.

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This economic downturn could actually work in Birmingham's favor as far as growth goes. BHM has been fairing a lot better than many many other areas in the nation. As soon as the economy starts to pick back up, corporations and developers will look the place that's progressing the fastest as far as recovery goes. If the region handles this right, it could be a major plus in the future.

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Based on the July 1, 2007 population estimates...

Birmingham MSA (Jefferson, Shelby, St. Clair, Walker, Blount, Chilton, and Bibb) = 1,108,210

That's an increase of about 8,000-9,000 folks since July of 2006.

Birmingham CSA (Jefferson, Shelby, Cullman, St. Clair, Walker, Blount, Chilton, and Bibb) = 1,188,764

Nothing too spectacular in the numbers, but the region does at least continue to grow gradually. Birmingham is really in need of something big to help to population really take off. Of course, given the downturn in the economy nationwide, alot of areas are really struggling right now. Hopefully that will end very soon.

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Now what I really want to see in the 2010 Census is the fact that Birmingham is actaully growing at a substantial pace. We are currently around 8-10% growth, but I would be nice to see that percentage to increase to 15-20% range. Hopefully, we can turn around the sprawl and exurbanization of this region and create more infill.

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And I still think that if we are going to get more infill, we are going to have to think "new." Of course all of the gentrification is good, but that just isn't for some people. In the city, we have parts of Oxmoor Valley that could be for more mid to upscale housing, and perhaps a community school(instead of allowing the kids to attend Vestavia Schools); or we could just look to the east. Old, sketchy places within Gate City, Woodlawn, Eastlake, Huffman, etc., should/could be torn down,and revitalized with fresh new homes(ranging from lower mid to upper mid to upscale), businesses, etc, in addition to the redevelopment of older homes...the perfect mix of old and new. I envision the area connecting to nicer neighborhoods such as Roebuck(Springs), Crestwood, parts of Avondale, and dare I say it, Mountain Brook and Forest Park via a Mt. Laurel type community. The trend is to live in the city nowadays anyhow, and I could even see a couple of urban type residences such as low to midrise condos/apartments/lofts along I-20 just north of Century Plaza near Edwards Chevrolet...sort of an (downtown Huntsville looking)"uptown" development.

The economy could definately work in the cities favor with gas prices and the commutes into the city. People living in these areas would still have what they would need as if they were living in Hoover, Pelham, 280, or Trussville. For example in the Oxmoor Valley, they would have choices on whether to shop and eat on Lakeshore, in Bessemer/McCalla, or in Hoover, and living in East Birmingham, you could shop and eat in Eastwood/Irondale, Trussville, Roebuck, or even Mountain Brook(if you could afford to). And keep in mind that the airport isn't too far away. I would love to see these type things happen over the next couple of years.

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What is the 2007 population of city proper?

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