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(WVA) [Huntington] Pedestrian bridge needed at Pullman Square

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"What would a pedestrian bridge look like at Pullman Square?" --

http://www.heralddispatch.com/apps/pbcs.dl...EWS01/606250341

"Think big, creatively to improve access to riverfront park" --

http://www.heralddispatch.com/apps/pbcs.dl.../606250314/1034

Having crossed from Pullman Square to Harris Riverfront Park yesterday, I can vouch for a need for improved crossings. There were once traffic lights at 10th and 11th Streets along Veterans Memorial Blvd., however, they were removed in the late-1990's. With Pullman Square complete, there are a lot of pedestrians who have difficulty crossing from the town to the river. There are no crosswalks and it is impossible for the disabled to cross the single railroad track.

Plans were in place to install a pedestrian bridge from a parking structure at Pullman, but it was removed from the drawing board early on.

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"What would a pedestrian bridge look like at Pullman Square?" --

http://www.heralddispatch.com/apps/pbcs.dl...EWS01/606250341

"Think big, creatively to improve access to riverfront park" --

http://www.heralddispatch.com/apps/pbcs.dl.../606250314/1034

Having crossed from Pullman Square to Harris Riverfront Park yesterday, I can vouch for a need for improved crossings. There were once traffic lights at 10th and 11th Streets along Veterans Memorial Blvd., however, they were removed in the late-1990's. With Pullman Square complete, there are a lot of pedestrians who have difficulty crossing from the town to the river. There are no crosswalks and it is impossible for the disabled to cross the single railroad track.

Plans were in place to install a pedestrian bridge from a parking structure at Pullman, but it was removed from the drawing board early on.

And... in a horribly thought out letter to the editor (which I plan on replying to) --

http://www.heralddispatch.com/apps/pbcs.dl.../606300340/1034

Politicians just move businesses around

After reading a recent article about Rep. Nick J. Rahall securing $500,000 for a pedestrian bridge linking Pullman Square and Harris Riverfront Park, I just could not keep quiet.

Rahall says that Pullman has revived downtown Huntington. Made it better looking, yes; increased retail businesses, no. Put up one new theater; closed two old ones. Put up several new restaurants; taken business away from the existing ones. Retail shops, non-existing in Pullman except for the bookstore. Woohoo, that will bring them in.

Rahall secured the funds from a "transportation bill;" look at the roads around Huntington.

Ten years ago, we owned a grocery store on U.S. 52 in Wayne County for more than 23 years. The state highway department took the property for a new highway to connect the Tri-State area with North Carolina and South Carolina and bring businesses into southern West Virginia. That was 10 years ago. They have not touched the property except to dump mud on it.

When asked why they have not started on that section of the highway -- no money. It seems our politicians are just good at moving businesses around, not creating new ones or new jobs.

In my opinion, Huntington made one mistake when it chased the building of Interstate 64 to the outskirts of town and then saying we don't want a mall downtown. Oh, but $500,000 to walk to the river -- that will bring us some revenue and jobs.

Joseph E. Smith

Huntington

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And... in a horribly thought out letter to the editor (which I plan on replying to) --

http://www.heralddispatch.com/apps/pbcs.dl.../606300340/1034

I grew up in Huntington for the first 8 years of my life and the city will always have a special place in my heart for the city. I love the old Methodist church downtown that I used to attend. I really hope Pullman Square revitilizes downtown, it needs it.

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Same here, only it was for the first fifteen years of my life. I was just in Huntington this past weekend for a funeral, so we took the opportunity to drive around (and to grab a Stewart's Hot Dog, of course).

Pullman Square is very nice. It's a very good use of the "super block" that sat empty for so long. A Pedistrian Bridge over to the Harris Riverfront Park would be a welcome addition. However, let's not stop there. There are so many more things that the mayor and city council could do to help revitalize the city of Huntington. I don't even know where to begin with the list, but I really want to start with traffic flow.

Some decisions were made in the past with regard to traffic flow which may have inadvertently put a damper on ease-of-use or traffic-friendly flow through downtown; thus, people would be more inclined to bypass Huntington and, therefore, not stop in. Unfortunately, correcting these mistakes now would be very costly; however, in the long run, I feel the cost would be well worth it.

For starters, it'd be nice if one could exit off of I-64 at the 5th Street Exit and actually drive along 5th Street all the way to the 5th Street Bridge. The disconnect in between is very perculiar. Additionally, there should eventually be another (preferably 4-lane) bridge across the Ohio River that connects directly to 16th Street/Hal Greer Boulevard. And, everything along the Ohio Riverfront between 5th Street and 16th Street should be built up, filled in, and turned into a huge park on the waterfront.

Huntington could stand to remove a lane or two from both 3rd Avenue and 5th Avenue to create landscaping (lots of trees that will grow to be tall and green and provide a canopy), on-street parking slots (free - no fee), such as what has been done in my current city of Greenville, South Carolina, and spaces for public art and entertainment. This would entice more people to venture into downtown and entice more businesses to set up shop to cater to these people that will be venturing into downtown.

I had also seen or read once that Huntington was planning to landscape and create on-street parking along 4th Avenue between 6th Street and 16th Street right at the foot of Old Main at Marshall University. I didn't notice when I was there whether this had been done, but I think this would be an excellent idea.

One thing that has impressed me is that Marshall University has grown and expanded across 3rd Avenue to the North and across 5th Avenue to the South. The pedestrian bridges crossing Third Avenue are very nice as well. There's more to Huntington than Marshall University though, or at least there should be. I suppose it all depends on what identity the city leaders want the city to take on.

Overall, I would like to see Huntington concentrate on revitalizing it's core: the entire area bordered by the Ohio River, 5th Avenue, 5th Street, and Hal Greer Boulevard (16th Street). Once that is in place and established once again, the city would most definitely grow from there.

Huntington is a beautiful old city and has the potential to be one of the most sought after places to live, work, and play in the country. It's time the city leaders capitalized on that potential.

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Yeah, it really is amazing how much Marshall has grown. I used to be around there alot when I was a little kid and they certainly have grown alot. I honestly think downtown Huntington would be dead (i.e. no heartbeat, lol) without the University. Btw, did you happen to see the Marshall-themed restaurant downtown? It was pretty good and pretty nice for downtown when I was there a year ago. Does anyone happen to know if there are any major projects in Huntington that piggyback off of Pullman Square or is it too early and most developers are just waiting to see what happens there?

Same here, only it was for the first fifteen years of my life. I was just in Huntington this past weekend for a funeral, so we took the opportunity to drive around (and to grab a Stewart's Hot Dog, of course).

Pullman Square is very nice. It's a very good use of the "super block" that sat empty for so long. A Pedistrian Bridge over to the Harris Riverfront Park would be a welcome addition. However, let's not stop there. There are so many more things that the mayor and city council could do to help revitalize the city of Huntington. I don't even know where to begin with the list, but I really want to start with traffic flow.

Some decisions were made in the past with regard to traffic flow which may have inadvertently put a damper on ease-of-use or traffic-friendly flow through downtown; thus, people would be more inclined to bypass Huntington and, therefore, not stop in. Unfortunately, correcting these mistakes now would be very costly; however, in the long run, I feel the cost would be well worth it.

For starters, it'd be nice if one could exit off of I-64 at the 5th Street Exit and actually drive along 5th Street all the way to the 5th Street Bridge. The disconnect in between is very perculiar. Additionally, there should eventually be another (preferably 4-lane) bridge across the Ohio River that connects directly to 16th Street/Hal Greer Boulevard. And, everything along the Ohio Riverfront between 5th Street and 16th Street should be built up, filled in, and turned into a huge park on the waterfront.

Huntington could stand to remove a lane or two from both 3rd Avenue and 5th Avenue to create landscaping (lots of trees that will grow to be tall and green and provide a canopy), on-street parking slots (free - no fee), such as what has been done in my current city of Greenville, South Carolina, and spaces for public art and entertainment. This would entice more people to venture into downtown and entice more businesses to set up shop to cater to these people that will be venturing into downtown.

I had also seen or read once that Huntington was planning to landscape and create on-street parking along 4th Avenue between 6th Street and 16th Street right at the foot of Old Main at Marshall University. I didn't notice when I was there whether this had been done, but I think this would be an excellent idea.

One thing that has impressed me is that Marshall University has grown and expanded across 3rd Avenue to the North and across 5th Avenue to the South. The pedestrian bridges crossing Third Avenue are very nice as well. There's more to Huntington than Marshall University though, or at least there should be. I suppose it all depends on what identity the city leaders want the city to take on.

Overall, I would like to see Huntington concentrate on revitalizing it's core: the entire area bordered by the Ohio River, 5th Avenue, 5th Street, and Hal Greer Boulevard (16th Street). Once that is in place and established once again, the city would most definitely grow from there.

Huntington is a beautiful old city and has the potential to be one of the most sought after places to live, work, and play in the country. It's time the city leaders capitalized on that potential.

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As for "piggyback" projects, 9th Street Plaza is being reconstructed to two-way traffic with new sidewalks and angled center parking. It includes ample room for outdoor seating at Marshall Hall of Fame Cafe, but on a whole, it leaves no provisions for benches since it attracts homeless people. (e.g. city has no money for routine patrols by cops)

I still want to see the Old Main corridor project become reality. The Mayor is fantasic in that he is one of the few forward-thinking people that remain in the city, but is often shot down by those who believe the city is dead and on its side twitching. He's also quite young, with most of the council members being ... quite old. Age plays a big role in development in Huntington and decision making.

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As for "piggyback" projects, 9th Street Plaza is being reconstructed to two-way traffic with new sidewalks and angled center parking. It includes ample room for outdoor seating at Marshall Hall of Fame Cafe, but on a whole, it leaves no provisions for benches since it attracts homeless people. (e.g. city has no money for routine patrols by cops)

I still want to see the Old Main corridor project become reality. The Mayor is fantasic in that he is one of the few forward-thinking people that remain in the city, but is often shot down by those who believe the city is dead and on its side twitching. He's also quite young, with most of the council members being ... quite old. Age plays a big role in development in Huntington and decision making.

Yeah, I had heard he won quite an upset victory. I really do wish him luck, Huntington needs some "vision" outside of Marshall. We need to get it back up to "city" level again (I had heard the pop in the city dropped below 50,000 in the late 90s)!!!

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Yeah, I had heard he won quite an upset victory. I really do wish him luck, Huntington needs some "vision" outside of Marshall. We need to get it back up to "city" level again (I had heard the pop in the city dropped below 50,000 in the late 90s)!!!

Late 1990's? Try now :P I think its just under 50,000, to around 49,700 if I am not mistaken.

With all the downtown condo/loft renovations going on or are proposed, I am hoping it can be reversed.

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Ugh...and I remember when it was just over 84,000. :shok: Hopefully the city council will go along with the mayor to get things done. Not all decisions will be popular in the beginning, but in the end, I'm sure they will pay off. You've gotta have risk takers sometimes. Incidentally, one of the city councel members, Jimbo Insco, is one of my old classmates from Altizer/Beverly Hills. It's funny...I never imagined him being a politician.

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Late 1990's? Try now :P I think its just under 50,000, to around 49,700 if I am not mistaken.

With all the downtown condo/loft renovations going on or are proposed, I am hoping it can be reversed.

The last census (2000) showed us at about 50,400. Very close to dropping under the "city" mark. It's really hard to tell with recent development downtown if and how that has changed. I hope it gets pushed back up. I'd really like to see us larger than Charleston again. (Spoken like a true Huntingtonian, eh?)

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