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northernbizzkit1

Memphis Interstates

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Memphis right now has 40 and 55, but will eventually be connected by I-69 as well as I-22. Will part of the outer loop remain Tennessee 385 or will it become entirely I-269? Here is a pic of what one guy put together...

Memphis-20.png

Could all of these interstates be too much? We'd have four with 22, but there are also talks to make an interstate/freeway from Memphis to Huntsville to Atlanta (kinda superfluous if you have 22 running to Birmingham and then Houston). Also...is 69 going to run to Tunica or will there be like an I-169 leg spurred out there?

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I think that is an old drawing. MDOT has released their alignment for I-69 from Robinsonville (in Tunica Co.) to its Mississippi River crossing here: http://www.msdoti69.net/pdf/PrefAlt.pdf

As you can see, there is a spur back to old MS-304 (which will probably be upgraded further to the casinos). Much of the new roadway for MS-304/future I-69 from and including this spur interchange to an interchange with I-55 has already been constructed and left unpaved for the time being. Check out a Google Maps aerial for that. I haven't heard anything about the spur being signed I-_69. I imagine it's unnecessary to sign it anything but "Casinos, 2 miles".

As for I-69 north of I-40 (old I-240 north loop), the MPO, City of Millington, and (I believe) the State of Tennessee have determined that I-69 will be totally on the west side of U.S. 51 in Shelby County with the exception of the existing TN-300/U.S. 51 Connector where there will be a full interchange. TN-385/Paul Barrett Pkwy/Future I-269 will be extended westward to an interchange with I-69. This drawing shows I-69 crossing U.S. 51 and connecting with existing TN-385 and splitting off on the east side of Millington. TDOT does not show a selected alignment north of TN-385, but the Millington Mayor has been lobbying for it to stay west of town and the MPO road plan shows it to the west: http://www.dpdgov.com/rs/resourcedocs/prio...map%2036x44.pdf

The selected alignment from I-40 to TN-385 from TDOT's website: http://www.tdot.state.tn.us/information%2D...segment_map.pdf

I don't know if a decision has been made to sign I-22 to I-55 along MS-304/I-269 or if it will sign north on MS-304 to Nonconnah Pkwy/TN-385 and then to I-240. The first option and the one shown on this drawing is the most likely. The least likely option is upgrading Lamar/U.S. 78 to I-240.

A Memphis to Huntsville Route and on to Atlanta (and possibly a connector to I-24 or I-75 close to Chattanooga) would be great for north AL and for Memphis-Chattanooga travel. Making the trip several times a year to the in-laws' cabin in north Georgia would be much better avoiding Nashville and Monteagle :P

If it does happen eventually, I figure it will connect on to TN-385/Nonconnah/Bill Morris Pkwy where the future MS-304/TN-?/I-269 interchange will be along the TN-385 route in Piperton. If Tennesse has no intentions of building it, MS may make a tie-on from I-269/MS-304 just south of the state line. If TN builds it, the route may spread the growth in Fayette County to towns such as Rossville, Moscow, and La Grange and may possibly impact portions of Hardeman County. MS would undoubtedly want to construct it in or around Corinth, so the route would likely exit TN before then.

The addition of a Memphis-Huntsville-Atlanta route has little value for Memphis and West TN as a whole with the exception of economic benefit for small southern Fayette County towns and a more direct route to Chattanooga. The biggest winner for a route like that is clearly north Alabama, which explains why the only agency showing any real interest in the route is ALDOT.

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What's noticable most is the paucity of river crossings, and the bottleneck where 40 and 55 merge in W. Memphis. 269 must lead to two new crossings, the 55/Crump interchange must be revamped, and the 55 bridge must be added onto somehow or replaced.

Also, Jonesboro is going to get an interstate spur connecting to 55.

It would be nice to get a direct route to KC...

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I always thought they should continue I-22 on the other side of the river, but the direct route would take you across buffalo national river so they would have to go around to get to kansas city.

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I think taking I-22 to Kansas City is a good idea in maybe 50 years or so. Not many sizable cities in that direction other than Jonesboro and Branson that I know of. Memphis is the distribution center of America so alot of interstates are neccessary. Luckly, we didn't have a major build up of interstate like many other cities did between 1950's-70's. We basically have a series of loops that don't tear apart the city. Since we are all now aware of the problems with sprawl, this city can take the lead in smart, suburban development. I wouldn't want suburban Memphis to become extremely dense like China, but I don't want it to become a sprawltropolis like Detroit, or LA. I read a while back about how people are now leaving Desoto County for Tate and Marshall County because they want country living. IMO traffic is worse in Southaven than it is in Memphis!

I just came back from Tunica and it seems as if that city is preparing for a huge amount of growth in the future. I-69 is almost done and so is the widening of Highway 61. Also, with the planned monorail, its easy to see how Tunica plans to develop....densely. A few subdivisons and apartment complexes are being built in western Desoto which is still very empty but its fun to imagine how that area's gonna change if Riverbend gets built. I think I found its website which is still under construction... http://www.riverbendcrossing.net/

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I think taking I-22 to Kansas City is a good idea in maybe 50 years or so. Not many sizable cities in that direction other than Jonesboro and Branson that I know of. Memphis is the distribution center of America so alot of interstates are neccessary. Luckly, we didn't have a major build up of interstate like many other cities did between 1950's-70's. We basically have a series of loops that don't tear apart the city. Since we are all now aware of the problems with sprawl, this city can take the lead in smart, suburban development. I wouldn't want suburban Memphis to become extremely dense like China, but I don't want it to become a sprawltropolis like Detroit, or LA. I read a while back about how people are now leaving Desoto County for Tate and Marshall County because they want country living. IMO traffic is worse in Southaven than it is in Memphis!

I just came back from Tunica and it seems as if that city is preparing for a huge amount of growth in the future. I-69 is almost done and so is the widening of Highway 61. Also, with the planned monorail, its easy to see how Tunica plans to develop....densely. A few subdivisons and apartment complexes are being built in western Desoto which is still very empty but its fun to imagine how that area's gonna change if Riverbend gets built. I think I found its website which is still under construction... http://www.riverbendcrossing.net/

While I agree with your goal, I don't know if Memphis, particularly suburban Memphis, has the mindset necessary to prevent sprawl. I think the city leaders have begun to realize, a little too late, that their planning has to be smarter along Nonconnah Pkwy. I personally question whether they're willing to do what's necessary. And this is based on what I have observed w/ respect to how G'town, Collierville, Cordova have largely gone about their planning. None of them strike me as walkable communities. I hope Riverbend is a legit mid-density low-rise community that can provide an alternative to cookie-cutter sprawling suburbs.

Like I said, I share the dream. I hope for the sake of the region it turns into reality. The city needs those kinds of communities. If only for diversity of choices.

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It would be great if they built levees at the shoreline on the Arkansas side of the river. Then they could make a nice middle to upper class urban community. With pedestrian only roads and small businesses. All with a great view of Memphis and the Mississippi river.

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It would be great if they built levees at the shoreline on the Arkansas side of the river. Then they could make a nice middle to upper class urban community. With pedestrian only roads and small businesses. All with a great view of Memphis and the Mississippi river.

there are levees, theyre just about a mile from the river, mainly because you need space to contain the flooding. i dont think a lot of people realize the amount of engineering that has gone into controlling the river. and keeping it on the same course.

you just can built levees right up against the river at a particular point what happens then is when the MS river is really high, and you have a much closer levee, river speed increases, erosion increases, and somewhere down river or even up river you can have a levee collapse, or a bridge base damaged. controling millions of cubic meters of water thats moving isnt easy.

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I read a while back about how people are now leaving Desoto County for Tate and Marshall County because they want country living.

http://www.riverbendcrossing.net/

This statement says a lot about the challenges of fighting urban sprawl. Many people rant against the developers for causing it, and they certainly have some role. But market forces drive sprawl more than anything else. For the majority of the people I know and work with, their dream home isn't in downtown or midtown. They want a big house on a big, multi-acre lot. Some even want farms.

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This statement says a lot about the challenges of fighting urban sprawl. Many people rant against the developers for causing it, and they certainly have some role. But market forces drive sprawl more than anything else. For the majority of the people I know and work with, their dream home isn't in downtown or midtown. They want a big house on a big, multi-acre lot. Some even want farms.

A house with a large yard is part of the American dream. One of my European vistors absolutely adored our sprawly subdivsions out in Cordova. The only thing he disliked was the lack of public transportation. I can see the appeal in living in a suburban subdivison over a highrise building or townhouse. Sprawl can be a good thing purely for diversity's sake. Ofcourse, like with all things, we shouldn't let it grow out of control. Since the market for homes in subdivisons is high, I think the best thing we can do is lessen the negative impact...

1)Public transportation. The light rail lines proposed, new bus routes in eastern Shelby County, and a Dial-A-Ride service will help raise the quality of life in our city.

2)Smaller residential zones. No more mega subdivisons like the ones along Chimney Rock in Cordova or Shelby Drive and Hacks Cross in Southwind. (Already being done in areas east of Berryhill)

3)Greenways and aggressive sidewalk requirements along all roads except in coves. My town in Michigan (population 10,000) started an aggressive sidewalk building campaign a few years back and now you see people walking, biking, and snowmobiling everywhere. Even to Walmart! Bike lanes might also be a good idea in some areas. Isn't Memphis one of the most dangerous cities for pedestrians? That shows a demand for more sidewalks exists.

4) Require bike racks at all light rail stations, shopping centers, and stores.

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A house with a large yard is part of the American dream. One of my European vistors absolutely adored our sprawly subdivsions out in Cordova. The only thing he disliked was the lack of public transportation. I can see the appeal in living in a suburban subdivison over a highrise building or townhouse. Sprawl can be a good thing purely for diversity's sake. Ofcourse, like with all things, we shouldn't let it grow out of control. Since the market for homes in subdivisons is high, I think the best thing we can do is lessen the negative impact...

1)Public transportation. The light rail lines proposed, new bus routes in eastern Shelby County, and a Dial-A-Ride service will help raise the quality of life in our city.

2)Smaller residential zones. No more mega subdivisons like the ones along Chimney Rock in Cordova or Shelby Drive and Hacks Cross in Southwind. (Already being done in areas east of Berryhill)

3)Greenways and aggressive sidewalk requirements along all roads except in coves. My town in Michigan (population 10,000) started an aggressive sidewalk building campaign a few years back and now you see people walking, biking, and snowmobiling everywhere. Even to Walmart! Bike lanes might also be a good idea in some areas. Isn't Memphis one of the most dangerous cities for pedestrians? That shows a demand for more sidewalks exists.

4) Require bike racks at all light rail stations, shopping centers, and stores.

Maybe traffic control paving (i.e. roundabouts or those expanded curbs where they force traffic to slow down to avoid hitting it). Also, the sidewalks should have a minimum width, and there should be more plaza-style and cafe-style sidewalks. I'd also zone some developments so that the majority of the parking must be hidden from the streets, behind buildings, and the structures would be closer to the sidewalks/main thoroughfares.

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I thought it was a requirment that all property annexed into the city had to have sidewalks built. I don't recall any Memphis neighborhood that doesn't have sidewalks.

The county of course is different.

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I don't recall any Memphis neighborhood that doesn't have sidewalks.

The county of course is different.

I could be interpreting "neighborhoods" wrong, but there are countless residential streets in Memphis that don't have sidewalks or curbs.

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I could be interpreting "neighborhoods" wrong, but there are countless residential streets in Memphis that don't have sidewalks or curbs.

Really?

I haven't lived in Memphis in decades, and back then when the city annexed an area, sidewalks were the first things that went in.

Are you talking about newly annexed areas such as Cordova and/or parts of SE Memphis? I wonder if the city dropped its sidewalk requirement since it's gone so annexation crazy.

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Really?

I haven't lived in Memphis in decades, and back then when the city annexed an area, sidewalks were the first things that went in.

Are you talking about newly annexed areas such as Cordova and/or parts of SE Memphis? I wonder if the city dropped its sidewalk requirement since it's gone so annexation crazy.

Most neighborhoods I've visited in Cordova have sidewalks. The neighborhoods I was thinking of are the ones I drive through most often, in E. Memphis. In the Shady Grove area, esp. There you can find several very nice neighborhoods w/o sidewalks. But it's true, the vast majority of Memphis neighborhoods do have sidewalks.

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I could be interpreting "neighborhoods" wrong, but there are countless residential streets in Memphis that don't have sidewalks or curbs.

Just about every neighborhood I can think of has some sidewalks, but some individual streets or portions of streets do not. Much of my neighborhood - Yorkshire - does not have sidewalks. West Crestwood and East Crestwood are two nearby streets that have no sidewalks at all. But they are winding streets that traverse very wooded and slightly rolling topography...the absence of sidewalks give the streets a distinct country feel in the middle of a large city.

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