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JunktionFET

Alternative Fuels in the Triangle

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In Cary, a BP station in MacGregor is going to join several other existing stations in the region by serving Soybean based Biodiesel fuel. They are having a "light lunch" on June 28 for enthusiasts and people who rock a diesel power vehicle.

This station is only 3 miles or so from my house. Before this, the nearest station was a good 10-15 minute drive from home... so this is cool!

Progress Energy has already converted the majority of their fleet to Biodiesel, and the state is considering converting their vehicles. Wake County schools (and perhaps surrounding counties) is considering converting their school bus and maintainence vehicle fleet as well.

The beauty of Biodiesel is that it is something that is homegrown, and it is renewable. Not only that, but it burns cleaner and has more potential energy than dino-diesel. It takes less energy to prepare it, and the refining process is not harmful to the environment (unlike petroleum).

Here in NC Biodiesel is obtained from Soybeans, but in places like the midwest it can be obtained from Corn. Either way, high reliance on Biodiesel would bolster the American economy in a way that has never been seen. The poorest parts of the country would experience an unparalleled economic boom.

I don't need to mention what it would do to the political landscape, but needless to say, I don't think the US would care much about what's going on in oil producing Middle East countries. Such countries would have to find some other product to sell in order to fill the rather large gap that would be formed in their economy, like sand maybe. :)

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Yeah, I haven't heard of this being sold at a station either. Would be nice if something like this became widespread.

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E85 is an excellent alternative fuel for gasoline engines. A surprising number of new cars on the market have the ability to use this type of fuel. Technically, many older fuel injected cars (like European cars from the 80s) can burn it just fine. A simple idle A/F mixture and timing tweak is all that's really needed on most. Vehicles built before a certain date (sometime in the mid 80s) benefit from renewed fuel lines and fuel system o-rings, but that really isn't a big deal. Vegetable based fuels tend to be hard on old style rubber.

Newer cars that used mapped fuel and ignition systems need to be programmed to handle E85--keeping the engine in optimal tune. On the newest of cars, the use of E85 all comes down to what software is running your engine. :)

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I am all for an alternative fuel that would: a) be safer for the environment, B) be easy to acquire, c) be cheaper and d) decrease our dependency on oil-producing countries.

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Biodiesel continues to impress me. This is my second tankful and I love it. I can tell the engine likes it too. Now we just need more stations and more exposure.

The engine does feel smoother, and the exhaust has definitely lost what little potentcy it had.

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I just bought a new vehicle that can run on E85. Anyone know if there is a place in the Triangle where I can get it?

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Thanks guys. Hopefully Raleigh will get one soon. I would love to be able to try the E85 blend.

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I don't think THAT is really fair! :) There are plenty of reasons to seek alternative fuels that have nothing to do with global warming. Two that come to mind are diversification of our economy (The Colonial pipeline is the aorta to the world's economy), and expansion of options makes prices fall - we're paying a monopoly in the middle east for fuel.

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Buy Citgo. No ties to MidEast oil there.

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Seriously? Where does it come from? Genuinely curious.

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I tried to find the other post on this but couldn't.

The station that has E85 is "Cruizers Filling Station" on Sedwick Rd right off of I-40 near 147 (the Durham Freeway).

http://maps.google.com/maps?q=1914+Sedwick+Rd+Durham+NC

( They also have B20 biodiesel )

To see if your car's compatible with E85, go here: http://www.e85fuel.com/e85101/flexfuelvehicles.php

Hope this helps -

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Hope more are coming soon! Kind of sad to see just one here and in Southern Pines....especially since the president thinks this is going to cure our addiction to oil.

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The station that has E85 is "Cruizers Filling Station" on Sedwick Rd right off of I-40 near 147 (the Durham Freeway).

What are they charging?

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very cool news...thanks for the update. My vehicle will take E85 and was waiting for a station nearby.

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I drove by there right before the opening. I think they were in the $3.25/gallon range, but that is only a guess and could have been grand opening prices. It is at 55 and Sedwick, about two miles south of I-40's 54/55 exit.

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Damn. My '04 Focus won't take E85. I'll still enjoy a solid 32 MPGs on the highway nevertheless.

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Only Fuel-Flex vehicles will take E-85. The highest grape of ethanol fuel standard (usually post-1995) cars can take is E-10.

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