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TomMSCE

Florida Hospital addition

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Florida Hospital is putting up a 15-story tower adjacent to Rollins Street that will contain approx. 300 beds. The foundation pour took place overnight last Saturday/Sunday. A mat foundation about 5 feet thick is being used (no piles on this one). Here are some pictures from the foundation pour.

Final preparations underway, pumping systems in place:

p62400015rd.th.jpg

Convoy of concrete trucks incoming:

p62400145oo.th.jpg

Finished product:

p62500222qu.th.jpg

Another angle:

p62500297kq.th.jpg

Enjoy!

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Thanks for the pics.

How long exactly do you think that will take to harden?

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Thanks for the pics.

How long exactly do you think that will take to harden?

Its done. Rebar is being placed for the vertical columns as we speak.

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Let me correct myself: The finish is dry to the touch, dry enough to work on, carry minimal loads, etc. The test cylinders under ideal conditions won't reach strength for about 28 days.

The height is 274'

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Let me correct myself: The finish is dry to the touch, dry enough to work on, carry minimal loads, etc. The test cylinders under ideal conditions won't reach strength for about 28 days.

The height is 274'

274' for 15 stories? That's 18' a floor...is the extra floor height for something hospital-ish?

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274' for 15 stories? That's 18' a floor...is the extra floor height for something hospital-ish?

No its 214' to the top of the parapet. The floor heights are at 14' per floor. Its the glass ornament that takes you up the extra 60 feet. The top of the beacon light is at 273'7" Now, i'm second guessing myself, but that should be right :blink:

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No its 214' to the top of the parapet. The floor heights are at 14' per floor. Its the glass ornament that takes you up the extra 60 feet. The top of the beacon light is at 273'7" Now, i'm second guessing myself, but that should be right :blink:

Maybe I just haven't been paying attention, but has there been a rendering posted somewhere for this one?

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A mat foundation about 5 feet thick is being used (no piles on this one).

That is similar to what they did with "The Copper Whopper" at Orange & Washington, isn't it? Huge mass of concrete on the bottom with no piles. I wonder what the reasoning was behind that.

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That is similar to what they did with "The Copper Whopper" at Orange & Washington, isn't it? Huge mass of concrete on the bottom with no piles. I wonder what the reasoning was behind that.

From my understanding, deep foundations are not always required to provide adequate support for the building with an acceptable amount of settlement, so when a shallow foundation system can serve this purpose, that's usually what the engineer will go for, since it's easier to construct and is usually cheaper.

Also, take into consideration that this tower will have one or more basement levels. You can see how in my third and fourth pictures, that the finished elevation of the poured mat is still 20 or 30 feet below natural grade surrounding the site. Removing 20-30 feet of soil over the area of the building footprint removes a lot of weight from the underlying soil, such that once the building is complete, the weight of the building will cause a minimal net increase in bearing pressure on the underlying soil.

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From my understanding, deep foundations are not always required to provide adequate support for the building with an acceptable amount of settlement, so when a shallow foundation system can serve this purpose, that's usually what the engineer will go for, since it's easier to construct and is usually cheaper.

Also, take into consideration that this tower will have one or more basement levels. You can see how in my third and fourth pictures, that the finished elevation of the poured mat is still 20 or 30 feet below natural grade surrounding the site. Removing 20-30 feet of soil over the area of the building footprint removes a lot of weight from the underlying soil, such that once the building is complete, the weight of the building will cause a minimal net increase in bearing pressure on the underlying soil.

Good sumation. Explaining the engineering of a structure this large is extremely difficult in the amount of words we try to use on these threads. You did a good job.

The other factor that determined the use of a mat was the water table. As Tom pointed out we are still 20 some feet below grade is some places, with the base of the mat being lower. Between that and the overall location of the hospital being so close to a lake its all you could do. The dewatering system has been on 24 hours a day from day one. It takes the water out of the soil all around the perimeter and pumps it right back into the lake. You could do this forever and it would always be an issue. That being the case it was determined that you could not shut down the system until the third floor was poured. Any earlier than that and the hospital would essentialy float away. Once the third has been reached the system will be turned off, allowing the water to rise back up tp its natural table, and for lack of a better term the hospitals load will be large enough to stay in place and basically "swim" :huh: . This is where high rise construction gets fascinating.

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Good sumation. Explaining the engineering of a structure this large is extremely difficult in the amount of words we try to use on these threads. You did a good job.

The other factor that determined the use of a mat was the water table. As Tom pointed out we are still 20 some feet below grade is some places, with the base of the mat being lower. Between that and the overall location of the hospital being so close to a lake its all you could do. The dewatering system has been on 24 hours a day from day one. It takes the water out of the soil all around the perimeter and pumps it right back into the lake. You could do this forever and it would always be an issue. That being the case it was determined that you could not shut down the system until the third floor was poured. Any earlier than that and the hospital would essentialy float away. Once the third has been reached the system will be turned off, allowing the water to rise back up tp its natural table, and for lack of a better term the hospitals load will be large enough to stay in place and basically "swim" :huh: . This is where high rise construction gets fascinating.

In Florida, anyway :-) Or anywhere with a high water table... Don't they have to waterproof the concrete somehow? Or will there be a sump and pump in the basement?

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In Florida, anyway :-) Or anywhere with a high water table... Don't they have to waterproof the concrete somehow? Or will there be a sump and pump in the basement?

Yeah, Bentonite. Everywhere.

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In Florida, anyway :-) Or anywhere with a high water table... Don't they have to waterproof the concrete somehow? Or will there be a sump and pump in the basement?

From my understanding, the design specifications for the basement call for it to be "watertight." The foundation will be insulated with some type of bituminous material, and the concrete itself is acid-resistant to help it withstand the natural corrosivity of the soil.

Another interesting feature (for me anyway) is a drain pipe on the west side of the building. The natural groundwater flow in what is now the building footprint used to flow west towards Lake Estelle. This new building and its basement are now blocking this natural flow, such that groundwater will now stage higher on the west side of the building. To deal with this, perforated piping wrapped in geofabric and filled with gravel are to be installed or are already installed on the west side of the building, located just above the estimated seasonal high groundwater level, to channel this high-staging water towards the lake.

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so this thing will be just shy of Plaza North, at the roof.

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Construction Update:

Basement level colums poured out. Ground floor deck placed, poured first half this morning. Ground floor coulmns rebar placed and formed as of this morning.

If you drive by you can actually see it sticking up above grade.

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Good stuff. By the way, Florida Hospital is building a fifteen-story tower in Ormond Beach, just off I-95.

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Good stuff. By the way, Florida Hospital is building a fifteen-story tower in Ormond Beach, just off I-95.

Their building everywhere. Between the seven different projects on the campus downtown, Alamonte, which just topped out, Winter Park Expansion, and FL Hosp east all under construction, I'd say healthcare is a profitable business.

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Why wife serves on the board of directors for Florida Hospital East.

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If I'm not mistaken that Ormond project is a Robins & Morton job. Its getting pretty close to groundbreaking right?

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If I'm not mistaken that Ormond project is a Robins & Morton job. Its getting pretty close to groundbreaking right?

They were clearing ground when I drove by around three weeks ago.

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Why wife serves on the board of directors for Florida Hospital East.

East is turning out really nice (not a B&G job UPSDAN ;) .

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Drove by the site this morning and they are moving pretty quickly on this. They have poured the second elevated deck on the entire hospital and have shoring and deck framing erected for the entire third deck, which would be the floor slab for level three. This project doesn't get a lot of play on these boards, but considering the size it would be nice to keep it on the front page.

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Drove by the site this morning and they are moving pretty quickly on this. They have poured the second elevated deck on the entire hospital and have shoring and deck framing erected for the entire third deck, which would be the floor slab for level three. This project doesn't get a lot of play on these boards, but considering the size it would be nice to keep it on the front page.

A picture would be nice :D

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