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PHofKS

28 Story Bldg for Bass, Berry?

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Channel 5 just announced that a 28 story bldg adjacent to the Shelby Street bridge to house one of Nashville's largest law firms has been proposed.

Anyone know anything else about this?

EDIT:

They also said it would be 'the tallest building south of Broadway'. I imagine it would be at least 400'.

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Just saw this too...I was also hoping someone would know what this is.

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There has been speculation on this forum that the parking lot next to the Symphony Hall could be the site for the rumored building.

The view of the lot, with the new Schemerhorn Symphony Hall to the right, from the Shelby Street bridge.

Spring035.jpg

The Symphony Hall could be surrounded by high rises with the 20 story, 200' Encore Condos across the street to the south, the proposed 20 story, 200' Westin Hotel across the street to the North and now this building across the street to the East. At least there is a park across the street to the West or all views would be lost.

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There has been speculation on this forum that the parking lot next to the Symphony Hall could be the site for the rumored building.

The view of the lot, with the new Schemerhorn Symphony Hall to the right, from the Shelby Street bridge.

Spring035.jpg

The Symphony Hall could be surrounded by high rises with the 20 story, 200' Encore Condos across the street to the south, the proposed 20 story, 200' Westin Hotel across the street to the North and now this building across the street to the East. At least there is a park across the street to the West or all views would be lost.

I believe that the current area surround the the Symphony is trashy--junky buildings, light poles galore, parking lots, poor streets, no sidewalks, etc. With three new high rises, the area will clean up, contain more street life, and lead to a much better downtown impression. Bulldoze Trailwest, the big parking lot, the dumpy brick buildings, and let's get started!

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I keep forgetting to ask my neighbor who is a Bass, Berry and Sims employee if she knows anything. If she did, she would be the type of person to tell...

Even though I wouldn't be opposed to this, I'm going to go ahead and start up the argument that this would be much better in the CBD and I wish there was some way they could find a spot there.

One other thing to add is that as an office building I wouldn't imagine it will do much at the street level, which is a shame considering what could be added at street level all around the symphony center with Encore and the Westin development.

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The "let's-put-it-in-the-CBD" argument is tired and ridiculous. Sure, I, too, am all for that pie-in-the-sky, urban fantasy design as well, but many of the vacant downtown lots are too small for large-scale development and many of the lots aren't for sale. Frankly, most anything that brings more residents, more business, more entertainment is ultimately better for Nashville. I draw the line, however, at a downtown themepark--after all, this is Nashville, not Branson, MO.

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i agree all the way, besides this is still in the loop, and still perfectly fine, i agree also that that argument is tired and old.

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The "let's-put-it-in-the-CBD" argument is tired and ridiculous. Sure, I, too, am all for that pie-in-the-sky, urban fantasy design as well, but many of the vacant downtown lots are too small for large-scale development and many of the lots aren't for sale. Frankly, most anything that brings more residents, more business, more entertainment is ultimately better for Nashville. I draw the line, however, at a downtown themepark--after all, this is Nashville, not Branson, MO.

Now that's vision! Nashville, not Branson! However, Brownhound...if our "pie-in-the-sky," "urban fantasy design" amounts to a bunch of giant steel-and-glass prongs bursting out of the asphalt and scraping the sky like downed spacecraft, the fractured angles of shattering glaciers, then we are truly lost. You see, even your best-case scenario would have us transformed into canyonized rodents, blood cells in an organism with no brain--insects living in a world built for giants, swathed in shadow, our necks perpetually wrung as we are forced to arch backwards, against the better nature of our spines, in order to look ever up, up, up for our sense of place--unable to comprehend the "sculptures" we have stacked on our homes in order to impress passing motorists, the winds shearing down upon us, and our eyes averted from the real places and faces that make up our homes. We will be looking at the sky, or perhaps we shall surrender and stare at our feet, rather than face each other in the ground-level "Stage of Human Events" we have failed to create. Our buildings will speak to other machines, rather than to us.

The Schermerhorn--perhaps Nashville's last fetid gasp at dignity and timeless beauty, as the city's bosom heaves under the tuberculur weight of reinforced concrete--is apparently on the verge of being swallowed and buried by maniacal machine-scaled Towers of Babel...and all the complaint mustered thus far reveals nothing greater than a fear that the skyscrapers won't be gathered sufficiently close enough to look like a cartel of blank-stare thugs. Where is the plea for a human-scaled environment, I ask you? Where is the demand for architecture that can be comprehended and enjoyed from two feet away, rather than from Interstate 911? When we will create a livable, beautiful city--rather than a collection of objects best driven past, always elusive, so grand as to strike without touching, to grab without holding, to be fondled and gawked at but never truly known or loved?

We are a nation obsessed with things, with bigness, with technological masturbation. The Symphony Hall should be surrounded by medium-rise buildings which pay respect to it, which frame it, which permit its enjoyment and civic statement to made without the rude interruption of televised high-rise monotone popstar ranting, vomited forth by the glass-and-steel non-architecture of yesterday's tomorrow. Look at the hall, and learn from it. Even it is far from perfect--what beauty it achieves is compromised by Egyptian Revival ironic nonsense design to score tongue-in-cheek points from the anti-classicist critical peanut gallery--but the poetry speaks in spite of the poet, and the building is worthy of both respect and affection. Please...let's not clad it in techno-greed, and let's at least be aware of our own civic suffering enough to lament the desecration of a building that has not yet even been born.

We will render ourselves anonymous, in an effort to measure up to an accidentally high falutin' Bright Lights/Big City picturesque aesthetic that has failed every other community in the world, and only delivers its promises of glory and perpetual civic flight on television--whilst scaring up some short-lived gasps from people who are motoring past the city at speeds high enough that their experience of Nashville is summed up in glances. We must build architecture for people, on a human scale, which is useful, strong, and beautiful--or else we build soaring memorials to our own dying culture...and remarkably bland ones, at that. As we continue our break-neck stumble into high-rise Bladerunning Paradise, please bear in mind:

Taking the lead on a dead-end track makes you last in the race to get back. We need architecture, not objects--places, not spaces. We need timeless beauty, not momentary coolness. Failure is not success by other means.

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The "let's-put-it-in-the-CBD" argument is tired and ridiculous. Sure, I, too, am all for that pie-in-the-sky, urban fantasy design as well, but many of the vacant downtown lots are too small for large-scale development and many of the lots aren't for sale. Frankly, most anything that brings more residents, more business, more entertainment is ultimately better for Nashville. I draw the line, however, at a downtown themepark--after all, this is Nashville, not Branson, MO.

The traditional core of the last 30 years is by and large built out, there are no sites large enough for new office construction. We are returning to our traditional downtown where Broadway is the center of downtown, as it was 30+ years ago, not the southern edge.

The only way for our core, the heart of our region to grow is south. To the north, the capital complex prevents expansion, to the east the water and the west the rail. Be excited about the fact that our core is aobut do double in size with the jump south of Broadway.

As to height look for under 280', maybe 255' or 265' from what I've heard in the last few months.

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The traditional core of the last 30 years is by and large built out, there are no sites large enough for new office construction. We are returning to our traditional downtown where Broadway is the center of downtown, as it was 30+ years ago, not the southern edge.

The only way for our core, the heart of our region to grow is south. To the north, the capital complex prevents expansion, to the east the water and the west the rail. Be excited about the fact that our core is aobut do double in size with the jump south of Broadway.

As to height look for under 280', maybe 255' or 265' from what I've heard in the last few months.

Please. We can do better than this. How does the proliferation of skyscrapers define "growth," make "a core," or represent a return to a "traditional downtown"? How on earth is downtown north of Broadway "built out" for "new office construction"? Have you ever been to Savannah or Paris? Come to think of it, have you ever been to Nashville?

There isn't any sense being made 'round these parts. There's a bunch of talkin', but not much sayin'. I am starting to feel like this whole thing is just a big practical joke being played on me by the Ghost of Le Corbusier's Supposedly-Informed Secretary.

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Again, since when is south of Broadway not Downtown? :huh:

If it's in the loop, it's downtown...I don't care what the "area" might be called...it's downtown. When are going to something out on Hermitage avenue, you don't tell someone "yeah, I'm going down to Rolling Mill Hill" or if you are going to the Symphony Hall, you don't say "I'm going to SoBro"...you say "I'm going downtown" or "I'll be downtown" dammit.

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If it's in the loop, it's downtown...I don't care what the "area" might be called...it's downtown. When are going to something out on Hermitage avenue, you don't tell someone "yeah, I'm going down to Rolling Mill Hill" or if you are going to the Symphony Hall, you don't say "I'm going to SoBro"...you say "I'm going downtown" or "I'll be downtown" dammit.

Thanks, I feel the same way!!! If its in the loop its downtown.

Its is what most of us wanted to see is A new large office tower downtown. But I'm started to get frustrated if people start to say that its not right for the area, or its to tall, or Whatever the complaint is for PROGRESS in our city. Because I know the complaints are coming.

I have nothing against anyone personal opinion when it comes to SOBO. But just look how everything is turning out if this tower along with the Westin gets built. SOBO's towers will extend the skyline further south and I believe once all the progress comes to life more and more money will be fueled into the area.

More Developments and restaurant's, shops. etc, will poor into the area and a urban neighborhood will start to form where there will people on the streets more than ever!!!!! :w00t:

But for me its getting to the point, if The Bass Berry project or the Westin gets shoot down for height restrictions or whatever it might me.

Don't be surprised if you see me protesting up and down the pedestrian bridge in between the to projects holding a sign saying, " When is the city going to wake up and embrace the growth."

I might have a tent and everything. :P

I'm somewhat kidding and somewhat serious :blush:

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Thanks, I feel the same way!!! If its in the loop its downtown.

Its is what most of us wanted to see is A new large office tower downtown. But I'm started to get frustrated if people start to say that its not right for the area, or its to tall, or Whatever the complaint is for PROGRESS in our city. Because I know the complaints are coming.

I have nothing against anyone personal opinion when it comes to SOBO. But just look how everything is turning out if this tower along with the Westin gets built. SOBO's towers will extend the skyline further south and I believe once all the progress comes to life more and more money will be fueled into the area.

More Developments and restaurant's, shops. etc, will poor into the area and a urban neighborhood will start to form where there will people on the streets more than ever!!!!! :w00t:

But for me its getting to the point, if The Bass Berry project or the Westin gets shoot down for height restrictions or whatever it might me.

Don't be surprised if you see me protesting up and down the pedestrian bridge in between the to projects holding a sign saying, " When is the city going to wake up and embrace the growth."

I might have a tent and everything. :P

I'm somewhat kidding and somewhat serious :blush:

I'd much, much rather have this project in SoBro at 28 stories, than several suburban office buildings with acres of parking adding to suburban sprawl taking it's place. A major new office building is exactly what downtown Nashville needs to round out the growth taking place int the area. The fact is this building probably HAS to be built in SoBro, because of a lack of a suitable site in the central business district.

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The article says the height will be 417 feet. So it would be taller than the L and C tower. I dont have a problem with it. I say build it and keep filling up everything else in the area. I am excited to see the rendering.

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I agree, Lukin.

I would rather see a more densely developed downtown, SoBro and West End than more sprawl out in Franklin.

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wow I didn't realize rehashing that argument would cause such an uproar. I mainly made the point because I figured someone else would shortly after that.

As I stated before, I am not opposed to this, I would welcome it with open arms, just as I am in favor of WES even at the current location. However, if things of this scale are going to be put in SoBro, the height cap needs to be removed or raised significantly so that future development is not hindered by it.

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wow I didn't realize rehashing that argument would cause such an uproar. I mainly made the point because I figured someone else would shortly after that.

As I stated before, I am not opposed to this, I would welcome it with open arms, just as I am in favor of WES even at the current location. However, if things of this scale are going to be put in SoBro, the height cap needs to be removed or raised significantly so that future development is not hindered by it.

I feel the same, the height cap needs does need to be removed or adjusted for the area.

The only part of SOBO that I personally couldn't see high rises built is a block or two past the Gateway Blvd.

where you start to go into the Rolling Mill area.

Only because the elevation of the ground is so high in that part of downtown mid to low rises would be well suited for the area.

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Now that's vision! Nashville, not Branson! However, Brownhound...if our "pie-in-the-sky," "urban fantasy design" amounts to a bunch of giant steel-and-glass prongs bursting out of the asphalt and scraping the sky like downed spacecraft, the fractured angles of shattering glaciers, then we are truly lost. You see, even your best-case scenario would have us transformed into canyonized rodents, blood cells in an organism with no brain--insects living in a world built for giants, swathed in shadow, our necks perpetually wrung as we are forced to arch backwards, against the better nature of our spines, in order to look ever up, up, up for our sense of place--unable to comprehend the "sculptures" we have stacked on our homes in order to impress passing motorists, the winds shearing down upon us, and our eyes averted from the real places and faces that make up our homes. We will be looking at the sky, or perhaps we shall surrender and stare at our feet, rather than face each other in the ground-level "Stage of Human Events" we have failed to create. Our buildings will speak to other machines, rather than to us.

The Schermerhorn--perhaps Nashville's last fetid gasp at dignity and timeless beauty, as the city's bosom heaves under the tuberculur weight of reinforced concrete--is apparently on the verge of being swallowed and buried by maniacal machine-scaled Towers of Babel...and all the complaint mustered thus far reveals nothing greater than a fear that the skyscrapers won't be gathered sufficiently close enough to look like a cartel of blank-stare thugs. Where is the plea for a human-scaled environment, I ask you? Where is the demand for architecture that can be comprehended and enjoyed from two feet away, rather than from Interstate 911? When we will create a livable, beautiful city--rather than a collection of objects best driven past, always elusive, so grand as to strike without touching, to grab without holding, to be fondled and gawked at but never truly known or loved?

We are a nation obsessed with things, with bigness, with technological masturbation. The Symphony Hall should be surrounded by medium-rise buildings which pay respect to it, which frame it, which permit its enjoyment and civic statement to made without the rude interruption of televised high-rise monotone popstar ranting, vomited forth by the glass-and-steel non-architecture of yesterday's tomorrow. Look at the hall, and learn from it. Even it is far from perfect--what beauty it achieves is compromised by Egyptian Revival ironic nonsense design to score tongue-in-cheek points from the anti-classicist critical peanut gallery--but the poetry speaks in spite of the poet, and the building is worthy of both respect and affection. Please...let's not clad it in techno-greed, and let's at least be aware of our own civic suffering enough to lament the desecration of a building that has not yet even been born.

We will render ourselves anonymous, in an effort to measure up to an accidentally high falutin' Bright Lights/Big City picturesque aesthetic that has failed every other community in the world, and only delivers its promises of glory and perpetual civic flight on television--whilst scaring up some short-lived gasps from people who are motoring past the city at speeds high enough that their experience of Nashville is summed up in glances. We must build architecture for people, on a human scale, which is useful, strong, and beautiful--or else we build soaring memorials to our own dying culture...and remarkably bland ones, at that. As we continue our break-neck stumble into high-rise Bladerunning Paradise, please bear in mind:

Taking the lead on a dead-end track makes you last in the race to get back. We need architecture, not objects--places, not spaces. We need timeless beauty, not momentary coolness. Failure is not success by other means.

Blah. If we could raze downtonw and start over, then I'd agree with your rebuttal. Otherwise, it's more of the same: Moan, gripe, and complain about progress.

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I just had a couple of questions before I really formed an opinion on this project. Is there an entrance to the Schermerhorn from the Shelby Street Bridge direction? Will this project cut off any sight-lines from the Schermerhorn that were built into the building (i.e. balconies, observation decks, etc.). Finally, if anyone has seen the modeling, I was intrigued while reading the Nashville Scene article by this statement:

"The basic massing model of what

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