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New Urbanism in Oakland, CA

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Fruitvale Station in Oakland was a very complete, satisfying example of New Urbanism (despite the funky architecture). It was clearly connected to transit (steps away from the BART stop) with local businesses on the ground floors and apartments above. In addition, a public library and well-used public space is included.

However, much of the urbanism of this project stems from the fact that it is in Oakland, a highly urban place to begin with. So it is questionable whether this should be called new urbanism.

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The banner honors an important figure in Oakland history (I can't remember who though) and in the background, the Fruitvale public market is under construction.

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Fruitvale is also privy to frequent bus access thanks to the strong network already in place in Oakland.

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Free bike parking and a bike repair shop increase the alternative transportation options.

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Next, although I didn't get out and walk around, I noticed some new TOD housing when I transfered trains in West Oakland. Here are some shots from the station, including Oakland's skyline in the background.

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Last, there is also a significant amount of high-density housing going up around Jack London Square, Oakland's Amtrak station. I didn't really explore this area much either, but here is a "cheap shot" I took while waiting for my southbound train back to Santa Barbara.

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This is awesome! Thanks for posting.

I had no idea Oakland was doing anything like this. It has such a nasty reputation.

I think this is borderline New Urbanism, because, like you said, it's already urban, and therefore doesn't fit some of the criteria. I've seen several developments very similar to this (Salt Lake City's Gateway Plaza comes to mind), and it just seems to be a trend in urban condo development. But it's always nice to see developers mixing retail and nightlife with residential, especially in Oakland.

Any idea how the occupancy is doing here? When was it completed?

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Yeah, Oakland's got some neat stuff. There's a gorgeous art deco condo building built on Lake Merrit in 1929 I'd love to check out.

Strangely enough although I lived just down 880 from Oakland, I've never been there and am just now discovering how neat a place it is. I'd love to go there sometime now...

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