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Project Thread/New Construction/Photo du jour/Const. CAMs


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11 minutes ago, TNinVB said:

Did I say something wrong?? Wasn't saying that the photo reminded me of Birmingham. My comment was in reference to the last part of MLBrumby's post about Southern cities with industrial decay. At least the last time I was there it appeared that way in some areas. 

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Could not see what you mean with "This looks like Nashville".

Actually, I meant it as a neutral comment based on the close-in neighborhoods, which other Southern cities have, but usually with a lot more tree canopy. Also those residential neighborhoods in the larger cities (and even midsize) in the south are still predominantly single family dwellings. Atlanta has changed so much, but even VaHi, Prado, Candler and Grant Park, C'town, and large swaths northeast are SFDs.

That particular shot of Nashville shows the big apartment blocks that have popped up in G'town.  And as is the case in the major "southern" cities (excluding FL and TX), there are usually curved streets and spotty pockets of skyscrapers, with notable exceptions in ATL and CLT.  That angle of Nashville shows a straight street and a dense downtown, which I am accustomed to seeing more in the Midwest (a'la KCMO, MPLS or even INDY). Then there are also several masonry low-rise buildings in that shot, which serve to remind of the older core population centers of those cities.

The photo just struck me that way. So I raised that flag to see if anyone agrees... and while that shot does not show the industrial decay of Nashville, even Detroit can get a fairly good photo angle from Woodward Avenue.  I understand your point, but let's not forget that there are still lots of Southern cities with industrial decay. 

 

You just presented industrial decay as a unifying rather than distinguishing feature of the regions, an entirely dissimilar projection from your initial statement. (We could say the same about the return to density that all the cities you mentioned share post 1990s.)

 

Yes, the 90-degree grid pattern is very Americana, and is found in "newer", more westerly cities in the United States. It's culturally (though erroneously) associated with solely the Midwest. Obviously, Nashville and plenty more non-Midwestern, non-American cities have grid patterns. So, that alone couldn't very well serve to distinguish regions/countries very much either.

 

I don't doubt that you were being perfectly candid, sharing your genuine impression. We share similar cultural cues; it's just that you overlooked the rather obvious (and in no way neutral) implication of your initial statement:

 

Nice(-looking?) = non-Southern, easily mistaken for someplace else/nicer

 

Tsk tsk.

 

 

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4 hours ago, titanhog said:

I can't believe Muse and 30 STM did a show in such a small venue.  I mean, Muse sometimes does football stadiums, right?

It could just be the nature of this tour because I think they are all at outside venues. So maybe it just fit well between two cities? I saw 30 STM in Knoxville years ago and it was only about 300-400 people but that was their first big album though . None of their concerts probably come close to Muse's level. Muse has had some concerts overseas at 150K, but it looks like there average is around 15-20K

That show was AMAZING. Muse knows how to entertain!!!

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1 hour ago, Nashtitans said:

^Nice camera

In that last pic, i see in the distance there's a hill with houses. Where is that?

I'm not sure the exact location but it might be off Shelby and 9th. They have a nice view of downtown.

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4 hours ago, vinemp said:

 

You just presented industrial decay as a unifying rather than distinguishing feature of the regions, an entirely dissimilar projection from your initial statement. (We could say the same about the return to density that all the cities you mentioned share post 1990s.)

 

Yes, the 90-degree grid pattern is very Americana, and is found in "newer", more westerly cities in the United States. It's culturally (though erroneously) associated with solely the Midwest. Obviously, Nashville and plenty more non-Midwestern, non-American cities have grid patterns. So, that alone couldn't very well serve to distinguish regions/countries very much either.

 

I don't doubt that you were being perfectly candid, sharing your genuine impression. We share similar cultural cues; it's just that you overlooked the rather obvious (and in no way neutral) implication of your initial statement:

 

Nice(-looking?) = non-Southern, easily mistaken for someplace else/nicer

 

Tsk tsk.

 

 

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk

 

 

 

Wow! Excuse me! I should have begun my post with, "Say what?" And I'm a lawyer who gets paid big bucks to decipher hyper-speak. I didn't even mention that your comment had the word "for" misused as an improperly used (duplicate) preposition.

Pasted below: 

That's not quite a compliment, is it? Let's not conflate the density of urban decay for which much diminished Midwestern industrial centers are known for currently with the [reclamation] of populated places in close proximity for which even our Southern cities were once known. ;-)

 

This looks like Nashville. <===== To what are you referring here? 

There's just so much here I could address. Who "erroneously associated" a classic street grid "solely with the Midwest"? Have you heard of Manhattan?  And dude... it's likely NOT for cultural reasons, but more for topographical reasons. 

You assumed a lot that I never mentioned in my original post. I thought my explanation would be sufficient to address your strangely worded reply. Really, dude! Have you heard of a period (grammatically speaking)?  They're great for ending sentences... or more pertinent to this discussion, splitting up multiple ideas. But anyway, as you can see above, you were the first to mention "density of urban decay" in reference to Midwestern cities. And you incorrectly assumed I was making some evaluative statement on the attractiveness of Midwestern vs. Southern cities. Of course, I explained that in my reply to your comment. Once again... just an evaluative comment which, like it or not, actually provoked thought in you about my observation. So we simply disagree... at least, I think. 

And "Nice looking" does NOT necessarily mean to the exclusion of other examples of the same item. Had you been a tad more discerning, you might also have considered that the compliment was in reference to the photo. I've seen lots of unflattering photos of Nashville... and of course, other Southern cities. Please don't take offense. 

Edited by MLBrumby
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1 hour ago, LA_TN said:

DSC_090101.jpg

I have always wondered why the windows were removed from the lower portion of the slanted roof. I can also remember light fixtures that were aimed up the roof were mounted there. Also, the metal cladding could use a cleaning. Starting to look grimy.

IMG_1011.jpg

Edited by TNinVB
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Wow! Excuse me! I should have begun my post with, "Say what?" And I'm a lawyer who gets paid big bucks to decipher hyper-speak. I didn't even mention that your comment had the word "for" misused as an improperly used (duplicate) preposition.

Pasted below: 

That's not quite a compliment, is it? Let's not conflate the density of urban decay for which much diminished Midwestern industrial centers are known for currently with the [reclamation] of populated places in close proximity for which even our Southern cities were once known. ;-)

 

This looks like Nashville. To what are you referring here? 

There's just so much here I could address. Who "erroneously associated" a classic street grid "solely with the Midwest"? Have you heard of Manhattan?  And dude... it's likely NOT for cultural reasons, but more for topographical reasons. 

You assumed a lot that I never mentioned in my original post. I thought my explanation would be sufficient to address your strangely worded reply. Really, dude! Have you heard of a period (grammatically speaking)?  They're great for ending sentences... or more pertinent to this discussion, splitting up multiple ideas. But anyway, as you can see above, you were the first to mention "density of urban decay" in reference to Midwestern cities. And you incorrectly assumed I was making some evaluative statement on the attractiveness of Midwestern vs. Southern cities. Of course, I explained that in my reply to your comment. Once again... just an evaluative comment which, like it or not, actually provoked thought in you about my observation. So we simply disagree... at least, I think. 

And "Nice looking" does NOT necessarily mean to the exclusion of other examples of the same item. Had you been a tad more discerning, you might also have considered that the compliment was in reference to the photo. I've seen lots of unflattering photos of Nashville... and of course, other Southern cities. Please don't take offense. 

 

I thank you for suggesting forebearance. But

it's difficult to overlook offense where it isn't veiled. And, since we can offend without actually offending here, I can take some satisfaction in pointing out that your blatant appeal to ethos, while perhaps true, doesn't resolve evidence of wanting comprehension and communication skills.

 

1. "This looks like Nashville" is an unambiguous description of a photo of Nashville (i.e. elementary, not LSAT) and, because it is so obvious, a comically ironic rebuttal to the comparison you proposed.

 

2a. "Nice pic" could refer to the quality of the photograph(y) or to the subject of the photograph. You clarified (confused?) which you meant when you followed with a reference to cities and regions rather than filters and focus. But this isn't​ the only time you lose yourself, is it?

 

2b. "Nice" is an evaluative term: it implies evaluation. You write that I "incorrectly assumed...some evaluative statement" only to offer "[o]nce again...just an evaluative comment". Well, which is it?

 

3. My reference to urban decay---for which the formerly highly industrial Midwest is infamous---is pertinent to the lack of urban decay in this photo of Nashville (i.e. arguing that it doesn't, in fact, look Midwestern; spurring you to clarify the criteria that led to your not-so-clear initial evaluation).

 

4. You didn't bring up my typographical error because it neither hindered the comprehensibility of my message nor was it relevant to the exchange. It's telling that, instead of responding in kind to my message, you gleefully display the editing skills of a sixth grader and call it macaroni.

 

5a. Periods aren't the only punctuation by which ideas might be marked or separated. We generally learn to employ them around the time we learn to communicate more complex ideas---well before law school for most.

 

5b. Read your initial post before you wax Arbitor of Orthography. (Moreso than accusing me of poor communication, this is where you committed offense.)

 

6a. "Manhattan"---being outside the Midwest---actually supports my estimation of the grid pattern being "erroneously" associated solely with that one region in American popular culture. (A J.D., huh?)

 

6b. Indeed, even a broken clock is right twice a day. "Solely" is a bit strident; "primarily", for example, might have been more reasonable.

 

7a. Let's try to remember that, far more often than not, computer-mediated communication [requires] greater attention to detail and consideration of potential meaning than face-to-face communication.

 

7b. We can easily remedy misunderstandings and avoid resorting to ad hominem attacks here. Ask for clarification and/or explanation before jumping to conclusions about tone and intention. Certainly, do this before interjecting puerile flourishes of pride of place and pay where execution of skill is more appropriate! We (i.e. you) shouldn't slough off our (i.e. your) responsibility for understanding on others. That's not a promising method for maintaining our online community.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Almost forgot about this dialogue it was so long ago. You obviously feel strongly about some use of a word or several, and you seem to take great pride in your SAT vocabulary. But honestly Dude, I didn't even make it through your verbose post.

Frankly, I don't have time for you, especially during a weekday.  So I'll be the bigger person and say, whatever!? And let it go! 

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