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Project Thread/New Construction/Photo du jour/Const. CAMs

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58 minutes ago, markhollin said:

The area was growing by 100 people per day for several years,  and currently it is growing at 84 people per day.  Hardly a significant slowdown.   It is still growing faster than most cities in the nation. 

And I don't even believe that 100 down to 84 figure. I don't think they can pinpoint the number. Probably been in that range for the past 4-5 years. 

Remember, that's been bandied by journalists who (collectively) are the absolute worst with numbers. They rarely get stats or figures correctly, and often they're wildly off.

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19 minutes ago, grilled_cheese said:

Nashville will beat Austin in the long run.  More interstates and pro sports.

No one knows what the future holds.  But those two things don't promote growth.  But I would argue that interstate highways did promote growth when they were being in the 1950s through 1970s.  Towns that didn't get an Interstate were hurt economically.

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13 minutes ago, FromParkAveToTN said:

I've been wanting to hike a trail around Radnor Lake, but afraid I'll be attacked and mauled by a grizzly bear. 

I borderline love you man.

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2 hours ago, FromParkAveToTN said:

I've been wanting to hike a trail around Radnor Lake, but afraid I'll be attacked and mauled by a grizzly bear. 

Around here you have to watch out for the notorious Mount Juliet Golden Bears.

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1 hour ago, donNdonelson2 said:

Around here you have to watch out for the notorious Mount Juliet Golden Bears.

Don't forget the wildly known cougars that roam the streets of Commerce to Union St. during lunch hours.

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16 hours ago, chris holman said:

Got this from google not sure If its right or not 

Screenshot_2019-05-12-12-04-16.png

Its still not an apple to apples comparison as Nashville is most of Davidson County. If you want to ma ke that comparison use the county populations and that gives a better perception. 

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13 hours ago, FromParkAveToTN said:

I've been wanting to hike a trail around Radnor Lake, but afraid I'll be attacked and mauled by a grizzly bear. 

I nearly stepped on a rattlesnake last summer. After that I had to take a break from hiking at Radnor for a while....

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15 hours ago, jmtunafish said:

Radnor Lake is a jewel.  Not many major cities have such beautiful wilderness right in the middle of town.

This "wilderness" is not natural.   The area looked pretty rough back in the 60s.  It was then expected to be developed for housing projects which fortunately was averted by the work of many concerned citizens.    The lake rose and fell very much back in the 30s when 1,000,000 or more gallons were drained daily for railroad purposes.   Here is a quote from the Radnor website:

"The lake was initially created to provide water for use by the L&N Railroad. In 1913, the railroad purchased 1,000 acres in the Overton Hills south of Nashville following completion of a railroad line from Decatur, Alabama to south Nashville. The railroad’s impetus was to build a reservoir large enough to supply water for its steam engines located at nearby Radnor Yards. With careful examination the downward running water supply and the basin below two ridges provided the perfect location. Otter Creek flowed through this basin, and over the next three years (1914-1917) and after the laborious man and horsepower needed to build the earthen dam and transform the landscape– Radnor Lake, the valve house and the valve therein was born. The lake was initially used for watering steam locomotives and supplying the watering pens for shipped livestock. Later on, it became a local sportsman’s club for L&N railroad executives and guests."

Pretty much what a lot of people regard as "wilderness jewels" are second or third growth on reclaimed land.   I remember when the most of the trees in the Great Smokey National Park were scarcely bigger in diameter than my leg. It was clear cut and eroded back in the 1920s.   Fortunately, nature has rebounded, but with climate change, it will be harder and insipient upon all of us to make sure it can still happen.

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4 hours ago, smeagolsfree said:

Its still not an apple to apples comparison as Nashville is most of Davidson County. If you want to ma ke that comparison use the county populations and that gives a better perception. 

But then you have to start going by square mileage...especially considering that a portion of Davidson is either too hilly for much development...parklands...or lakes.

3 hours ago, Baronakim said:

This "wilderness" is not natural.   The area looked pretty rough back in the 60s.  It was then expected to be developed for housing projects which fortunately was averted by the work of many concerned citizens.    The lake rose and fell very much back in the 30s when 1,000,000 or more gallons were drained daily for railroad purposes.   Here is a quote from the Radnor website:

"The lake was initially created to provide water for use by the L&N Railroad. In 1913, the railroad purchased 1,000 acres in the Overton Hills south of Nashville following completion of a railroad line from Decatur, Alabama to south Nashville. The railroad’s impetus was to build a reservoir large enough to supply water for its steam engines located at nearby Radnor Yards. With careful examination the downward running water supply and the basin below two ridges provided the perfect location. Otter Creek flowed through this basin, and over the next three years (1914-1917) and after the laborious man and horsepower needed to build the earthen dam and transform the landscape– Radnor Lake, the valve house and the valve therein was born. The lake was initially used for watering steam locomotives and supplying the watering pens for shipped livestock. Later on, it became a local sportsman’s club for L&N railroad executives and guests."

Pretty much what a lot of people regard as "wilderness jewels" are second or third growth on reclaimed land.   I remember when the most of the trees in the Great Smokey National Park were scarcely bigger in diameter than my leg. It was clear cut and eroded back in the 1920s.   Fortunately, nature has rebounded, but with climate change, it will be harder and insipient upon all of us to make sure it can still happen.

But thankfully...someone along the way decided to make it a "wilderness area" instead of something else after the railroad stopped using it.  A great example of reuse of an area that benefits everyone.

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18 hours ago, FromParkAveToTN said:

I've been wanting to hike a trail around Radnor Lake, but afraid I'll be attacked and mauled by a grizzly bear. 

If you take one step off the designated trail (or violate any other stated rule), you will be mauled by a ranger.  They are VERY strict and are quick to issue citations.

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With the cranes going up at Ascurion and Broadwest, what is the current count in all of the core? And is it a record? Or will it enlarge when 4 Seasons and Nashville Yards gets going even more?

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10 hours ago, wreynol4 said:

With the cranes going up at Ascurion and Broadwest, what is the current count in all of the core? And is it a record? Or will it enlarge when 4 Seasons and Nashville Yards gets going even more?

Right now in Davidson County there are 33.    In January of this year the total was 25.  I believe that later this year we will top the previous single-month record of 36 from Jan. of 2018.  

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It does sort of look like a model railroad scene. I love the train track being so close. That's just not something you see in downtowns anymore. 

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1 hour ago, MLBrumby said:

It does sort of look like a model railroad scene. I love the train track being so close. That's just not something you see in downtowns anymore. 

Seriously...when I looked at that image on OxBlue...it immediately took me back to playing with dump trucks and loaders in the dirt with my brothers and neighborhood kids.  Much simpler times!

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