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What type of siding do you think is most fitting and aesthetically pleasing?

What type of siding do you think is most fitting and aesthetically pleasing?   27 members have voted

  1. 1. What type of siding do you think is most fitting and aesthetically pleasing?

    • Vinyl
      0
    • Wood
      3
    • Hardiplank
      3
    • Stucco
      0
    • EIFS
      0
    • Brick
      11
    • Stone
      2
    • Limestone
      2
    • Metal
      0
    • Glass
      4
    • All of the above
      2
    • None of the above (explain)
      0

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14 posts in this topic

Well, the other day, my wife mentioned to me how much better she liked a stucco house in comparison to a house with regular siding. It got me thinking about how varied people's tastes are, and I wondered what people thought of the basic options for siding in an urban context.

I like brick, but others find it boring and too traditional. Others like stucco for its consistent texture. Still others prefer wood for its human scale and historic and natural effects.

What do you all prefer, and why?

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I voted brick for long term appeal.....here in Boston, the birck buildings have the best long-term appeal IMO. Short-term I like Limestone, but it doesn't age as gracefully, and ends up streaked, pocked, etc as it is a rather soft stone.

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I prefer stone houses followed by brick. They don't really build either here anymore due to the cost. In older brick and stone buildings, the brick and stone were actually part of the structure of the building. Today what you see is is brick and stone "veneer" where it is simply attached to the side of a wood or metal framed building.

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Give me wood, or give me death! lol

I like brick too, but I'm one of those people that prefer painted brick.

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Hardi looks like wood, but lasts forever. Fire resistant also.

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I guess I'm going to be the politician here and answer wood, brick (and painted brick), stucco, hardi-plank, and stone in no particular order. Let's just say I can't imagine anyone being a fan on eifs or vinyl.

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I couldn't imagine anyone liking vinyl or eifs, either, but I'm sure that some do, as they are wildly popular. (ugh). My sister and her hubby are proud of their expensive vinyl home in the exurbs.

I think wood will have new life in the coming years, as there are new non-toxic pressure-treatments that keep them from rotting, such as sodium silicate, which is basically sand/glass infused into the wood.

I still think brick has the most long term durability, and like a fine wine, it seems to build character the longer it is there. I even think that brick veneer will age similarly, as long as the adhesive doesn't cause it to fall off after 20 years or something like that.

Hardiplank is interesting to me, as it is basically concrete, but with the appearance and architecture of wood.

To me, I really love the old stone farmhouses in rural areas in Europe and in the NorthEast US. But somehow, they don't fit in the Carolinas to me. I think the new stacked stone buildings look like they belong in Denver or Boise.

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Stone farmhouses and churches are fairly common as you go further west in NC. It's a ready available building material in the western part of the state. In Marble, NC, there are buildings made of marble bricks.

I don't like vinyl mainly because it fades out in a few years, but a lot of people do like it as it requires no maintenance. And because it is relatively cheap to install, they can get more house. They are known as square footage houses. Quantity over quality, seems to be the American way now.

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Thatr is true about western carolina, I didn't think of that at first, but you're right, it does fit in the mountain to have stone structures. That is speaking of regular stone structures, rather than the stacked stone that seems to be in vogue these days with some people.

I'm not sure if I have the right term in "stacked stone", or "flagstone", with really wide but not tall rocks are stacked to create the wall. But that is what I'm referring to that doesn't really fit in this region, even in the mountains (although it fits better there than here).

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Monroe actually has a lot of quartz buildings (that's the white stone right) since it can be found all over Union County. In downtown there are several buildings that are built with it but there are also some old bungalows in Monroe that I love because they used different sizes and shapes of it to do designs in the stonework on the houses. There really is nothing like them that I've seen anywhere else. I'll have to take some pictures next time I'm in Monroe. It's actually a cool idea.

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I guess I'm a bit of a traditionalist, but I much prefer brick over the others.

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I should say that I'm most in favor of long lasting indigenous materials. In the Piedmont, that is brick, and possibly some stone (Quartz sounds pretty cool. I can't wait to see the photos).

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I have Hardiplank and brick on my house. I think when both are used together, it makes a nice looking house.

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The Hezikiah Alexander House is the county's oldest standing structure and it's stone. You can see it here in all of its 1774 glory.

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