Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

CLTfanatic

May be relocating to Dallas from Charlotte

7 posts in this topic

Just to get an idea of what I can afford, I've been looking at housing online, and everything seems to be running very very low. There are quite a few all brick, new houses with roughly 2000 sq for right around 150k. Maybe its just a completely different market, but those houses in Charlotte would be going for at least 300k. Is the market really that depressed in Dallas?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


That's how it is in all of Texas. Homes are cheap here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The issue with inexpensive housing in Dallas is abundant land and cheap labor.

Yes, you can find 2000 square foot brick homes but you have to be very careful with the builders. Many of those are entry level homes lacking amenities in demand.

I made the same move from CLT to Dallas in 1990. My Realtor taught me early for good resale, choose a home in a desired school district -- even if you do not anticipate enrolling kids in school.

The builders are forever developing farther and farther north with the latest and greatest bells and whistles. In the short run, if you sell within a couple of yars, you will compete with the builder and the builder always win on price and amenities.

If you hold on to your home long enough, you will have a better chance of seeing a return on your investment. Expect very modest gains over time.

Not sure where you will be working in the Metroplex. The cities of Allen, McKinney, and Frisco in Collin County are highly desireable and in demand. Plano is an excellent city as well but is becoming "built out" with older neighborhoods in need of renovation. (Older in Dallas can be the early 70's) Plano itself is well managed.

One thing to beware of ... soils in North Texas are expansive. They contract and expand with moisture or the lack thereof. The home foundations are basically concrete slabs and react to the contraction and expansion. That means the proper moisture level must be maintaqined around the perimeter of the foundation. Some homeowners do not heed this advice.

Be sure to get a very good inspection if you purchase an existing property. You cannot afford to risk a compromised foundation down the road.

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All of Texas is the same - cheap land and abundant cheap labor (immigrants) keep housing costs low in all but the prime core neighborhoods such as Highland Park and Lakewood in Dallas even though growth in DFW and Austin is as impressive as just about any major metro. If you want to get in the right neighborhood, though, you pay for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've noticed the same thing: housing is very affordable due to plentiful land and inexpensive labor; howeve, keep in mind that a 2000 sq. ft. home in Charlotte is usually 2000 sq. ft. heated/cooled. In Texas, most of the sq. ft. figures provided by home builders/realtors include the garage, for whatever reason. My wife and I just visited some family in Tyler and we're very seriously considering moving out there as well. I hope the housing market can stay as reasonable for a couple more years. :unsure:

One thing to beware of ... soils in North Texas are expansive. They contract and expand with moisture or the lack thereof. The home foundations are basically concrete slabs and react to the contraction and expansion. That means the proper moisture level must be maintaqined around the perimeter of the foundation. Some homeowners do not heed this advice.

This is some excellent advice, UrbanLifter. Thanks! What would you recommend? Irrigation systems? If so, then what do you do when there are restrictions on running irrigation systems? Use a hose to water down the peremiter frequently, I guess?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've noticed the same thing: housing is very affordable due to plentiful land and inexpensive labor; howeve, keep in mind that a 2000 sq. ft. home in Charlotte is usually 2000 sq. ft. heated/cooled. In Texas, most of the sq. ft. figures provided by home builders/realtors include the garage, for whatever reason. My wife and I just visited some family in Tyler and we're very seriously considering moving out there as well. I hope the housing market can stay as reasonable for a couple more years. :unsure:

This is some excellent advice, UrbanLifter. Thanks! What would you recommend? Irrigation systems? If so, then what do you do when there are restrictions on running irrigation systems? Use a hose to water down the peremiter frequently, I guess?

Soaker hoses to the foundation. Everyone will know about them and be able to tell you if you move here.

Ironically, I live in one of the very few areas where it doesn't seem to matter - White Rock Lake in Northeast Dallas. For a considerable distance around the lake there's solid white rock just a few inches down, giving you a rock-solid foundation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rested Traveler:

Most new homes in DFW are equipped with lawn and flower bed irrigation. The trick is to keep the soil moist but not too moist.

You should visually inspect the foundation weekly. Look at the line between the foundation and the soil. Make sure the soil is not pulling away from the foundation. I am not sure how to tell when there is too much moisture.

As to water restrictions: YES! During periods of draught, most cities place water restrictions. That is happening this year in DFW. You can see several articles on this at the Dallas Morning News website.

For example, here is one: Restrictions brings Out Tipsters

And another from today's online edition HP Goes After Liquid Assets

Hope all gos well for you and your family.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.