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DCMetroRaleigh

US Census: Forsyth increasingly Diverse

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Hispanics accounted for more than half of the population growth in Forsyth County between 2000 and 2005, but they were not the only newcomers to the county.

Midway through the decade, estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau show an increasingly diverse population calling Forsyth County home. The Census Bureau released race and ethnicity estimates at the county level at midnight last night.

Although the increasing Hispanic population has been the largest and most visible component of the change in Forsyth, Asians, American Indians and even those from the Pacific islands are increasing in numbers at a higher rate than non-Hispanic whites and blacks.

The number of people of more than one race is up 37.1 percent in Forsyth County since the 2000 census was taken, the new estimates show. Their numbers grew from 2,258 to 3,203.

WSJ

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Eye-popping figures considering that the Hispanic population may be vastly undercounted:

Hispanics increased 57.6 percent during the five year period, from 19,577 to 30,863. The increase of 11,286 people means that Hispanics contributed 57 percent of the county's total population growth during the period. They made up 9.5 percent of Forsyth County's population - up from 6.4 percent in 2000.

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Midway through the decade, estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau show an increasingly diverse population calling Forsyth County home. The Census Bureau released race and ethnicity estimates at the county level at midnight last night.

I noticed this this past Sunday while out to Eat with some Friends. There were all sorts of people in the restaurant and I made the comment on how Winston-Salem was starting to feel like other larger urban areas in the country due to the influx of Hispanic, Asian, and others. In my neighborhood alone we have 15 Phillipino families. This is a trend that isn't likely to ebb anytime soon.

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True, Suburban George. If the trend continues, Forsyth could be approximately 20% Latino a decade from today.

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I'm sure not all Forsyth residents are happy with this trend.

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I'm sure not all Forsyth residents are happy with this trend.

There is resistance to change everywhere. This is just a sign that our area is "maturing" and is being recognized by these ethnic groups as a good place to set up shop and to get work. I have no problem with it, I think a diverse population base adds to your cultural experience in a city.

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I don't mean that many residents are unhappy with the diversity per se, but the way that many (not all) of them come to the area: illegally. Surely the high numbers that we're experiencing all throughout the South can be attributed, in large part, to illegal immigration.

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I have heard negative talk of all the immigrants coming in and taking "our" jobs away. I'm not sure I totally agree with that because I don't see locals lining up for the jobs most immigrants take. However, I do wish they would play by the rules. But immigration is going to drive growth in the US for many decades to come, possibly even thru the next couple of centuries, so it's a reality we have to live with.

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Overall, the Census Bureau said, Winston-Salem's population dropped 1.2 percent from 2000 to 2005. Of the city's 183,467 residents in 2005, the estimates show, 88,194 were non-Hispanic white, 64,438 were black and 26,265 were Hispanic. The rest were other races or people of more than one race.

When the 2000 Census was taken, non-Hispanic whites made up 52.4 percent of the city's population, and blacks made up 36.4 percent. In the five years since then, the Census Bureau says, the Hispanic population went from 8.6 percent of the total to 14.3 percent. In 2005, the percentage of people who were black decreased to 35.1 percent.

WS Journal

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Overall, the Census Bureau said, Winston-Salem's population dropped 1.2 percent from 2000 to 2005. Of the city's 183,467 residents in 2005, the estimates show, 88,194 were non-Hispanic white, 64,438 were black and 26,265 were Hispanic. The rest were other races or people of more than one race.

I am a little surprised with all the residential activity in W-S that they say our overall population declined. To me it seems we are getting more and more crowded on our roads. Of course, census figures have been unreliable in the past. Of course, I do agree about the Hispanic and other races, they are indeed growing in the county.

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according to census.gov, W-S is at 193,755 for 2005.

im not sure those numbers are accurate. look at the graphic below. it says greensboro has 208,000 residents down 15,000 from 2000. the graphic has durham at 191,000 while the census website has it well over 200,000. something is wrong.

chartCompare.jpg

according to this graphic. all of "the big five" have lost population

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Winston-Salem should do what DC just did. They challenged the "lost population" numbers. And guess what, the Census said DC is right and adjusted its numbers upward by more than 31,000 people.

DC Population Challenged

"The U.S. Census Bureau acknowledged yesterday that it had underestimated the number of people living in Washington and revised its data to reflect the largest increase in the city's population since 1950.

The decision -- the result of a challenge by D.C. Mayor Anthony A. Williams to the 2005 census estimate -- immediately adds more than 31,000 people to Washington's official population, increasing it to 582,049."

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I thought it was odd when I was reading this early this morning and it said in 2000 we had 185,776 people but in 2005 we had 183,467. What gives? There's no way that Winston lost over 2000 people in a year! Something is seriously wrong here!

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I thought it was odd when I was reading this early this morning and it said in 2000 we had 185,776 people but in 2005 we had 183,467. What gives? There's no way that Winston lost over 2000 people in a year! Something is seriously wrong here!

isnt Winston over 200,000 now? I thought that was the case with the recent mass annexation that took place.

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The final Decision will be made by the state on August 18th, and If annextion is appoved it will go thur septerber 30th.

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according to census.gov, W-S is at 193,755 for 2005.

im not sure those numbers are accurate. look at the graphic below. it says greensboro has 208,000 residents down 15,000 from 2000. the graphic has durham at 191,000 while the census website has it well over 200,000. something is wrong.

WooHoo!! WE'RE NOT SHRINKING!! The Journal printed a correction today! The numbers listed do not include several groups of people we're actually at 193,755 like the census.gov website says!

WSJ article about correction on census numbers

This probably applys to other cities as well!

WooHoo!! We're still growing! :yahoo:

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Good. How about the other NC cities?

They didn't correct those numbers from the graphic, but they too were quoted from the estimate of "household" population. Those numbers don't take into account people living in rest homes, colleges, prisons, and other "non-household" living arrangements. I would say they all should be higher than originally reported in Tuesday's article. In reading the NUMEROUS corrections in the linked article I posted earlier, there were quite a few errors in Tuesday's report. I would write this off to a case of "sloppy fact checking" on the part of the Journal.

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I'm glad they printed a correction. That's a pretty big screw up. All the numbers of the cities they listed were wrong. And even though, the percentages were probably not off by much, they were incorrect as well.

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The state Appoved Winston-Salem Annexation today, check out the whole story at myfoxwghp.com.

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