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Honda Jet


monsoon

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I remember when honda was known only for motorcycles in the US anyways. 30 years ago Toyotas were pieces of junk that were sold with a toolkit. Volkswagon only made the beetle, an air cooled toy with no heat. Saab was an ungly little bean of a car with a 3 cylinder engine. Boeing was the biggest aircraft maker by far, followed by Mcdonald douglas and lockheed. All made jumbo jets. Now Airbus dominates. It wouldn't surprise me to see Honda and Toyota dominate the aircraft business. High quality at a good price always wins in a free market.

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I think this could potentially be a very good thing, pending they make sure security is enhanced at small airports and that this concept catches on enough to lower prices so that middle classers can tap into it as well...

Every major city has at least a few smaller regional airports, could you imagine checking in and flying directly to your destination even if it was a small town?

I like it! :)

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  • 10 months later...

I think this could potentially be a very good thing, pending they make sure security is enhanced at small airports and that this concept catches on enough to lower prices so that middle classers can tap into it as well...

Every major city has at least a few smaller regional airports, could you imagine checking in and flying directly to your destination even if it was a small town?

I like it! :)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

This is a very cool looking little plane. And if Honda can bring its same "Better but Cheaper" philosophy that brought them success in the auto industry in the 1970s, then they're set to revolutionize the business jet industry.

However, with small aircraft - specifically jet aircraft - you cannot even approach the economies of scale afforded by larger (50-passener plus) jetliner. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think a business jet still needs both a pilot and a copilot? That's expensive. It uses less fuel than an A380 to be certain, but remember that the A380 carries 100 times more passengers. You won't find too many hobbyists or businessmen flying themselves around, either since getting a pilots license for even a single-engine prop craft takes months of practice and schooling; the requirements for a twin-engine small jet aircraft are far more stringent.

Besides, small jets are limited in range - 1500 miles or so. Don't look for Southwest to go running for cover just yet ;)

BTW, any idea why they chose Greensboro as the testing grounds, instead of somewhere like Mojave? They couldn't possibly mean PTI, could they?

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Its not clear the A380 will ever make any money. Without heavy subsidies from Spain, France, the UK and Germany, the economics of that plane would dictate that it would have never been built. In addition the current A380 is overweight.

Airline analysists seem to think the real battle in very long flights will be against the B777 and the A350.

In Honda's case, they have to start somewhere.

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Greensboro has landed Honda!! :yahoo:

I think this is Great for Greensboro and the Triad. I think it was only natural for Honda Jets to be produced here. The first plane was tested at PTI and PTI has a number of airplane service companies onsite. GTCC also has an aviation school at PTI. Honda could also attract other distribution companies that could supply parts. Also maybe Honda's prensence in Greensboro could attract Toyota to Greensboro should the company decide to build another car manufacturing plant in the south.

http://www.news-record.com/apps/pbcs.dll/a...EC0101/60808001

here is also a photo link of the jet

http://bjimg.us.publicus.com/apps/pbcsi.dl...350&title=1

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