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DCMetroRaleigh

NC one of only four states with Increase in Home Sales

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North Carolina is one of only four states to post an increase in existing home sales for the first half of 2006.

Existing home sales in North Carolina grew 7 percent over sales for the same period a year earlier. Nationally, existing home sales decreased 7 percent in the first half of the year, according to the National Association of Realtors.

Only three other states -- Alaska, Arkansas and Texas -- joined North Carolina with positive, year-to-date growth in existing home sales.

The latest statistics compiled by the association indicate that 13,652 residential units were sold in North Carolina in July, and more than 83,000 units have sold since the beginning of the calendar year.

http://sanantonio.bizjournals.com/triangle...tml?t=printable

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And boy am I GLAD!! I was dreading I wasn't going to be able to sell mother's old house. However, you can count mine in the August numbers, hopefully they'll be up as well!! :D

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North Carolina is one of only four states to post an increase in existing home sales for the first half of 2006.

Existing home sales in North Carolina grew 7 percent over sales for the same period a year earlier. Nationally, existing home sales decreased 7 percent in the first half of the year, according to the National Association of Realtors.

Only three other states -- Alaska, Arkansas and Texas -- joined North Carolina with positive, year-to-date growth in existing home sales.

The latest statistics compiled by the association indicate that 13,652 residential units were sold in North Carolina in July, and more than 83,000 units have sold since the beginning of the calendar year.

http://sanantonio.bizjournals.com/triangle...tml?t=printable

What exactly does this statistic mean? If an increase in existing homes and not new ones, doesn't that just indicate shuffling, or relocation, as opposed to growth? Sorry, not being a smart ass, I must not understand something.

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You could also turn what you said around and say doesn't an increase in new home sales mean existing ones are just sitting around on the market longer? Are these new people just transplants from the north? Is an increase in new home sales simply exacerbating sprawl? Just a thought. My guess would be that NC is probably doing fine as far as new home sales go.

What exactly does this statistic mean? If an increase in existing homes and not new ones, doesn't that just indicate shuffling, or relocation, as opposed to growth? Sorry, not being a smart ass, I must not understand something.

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You could also turn what you said around and say doesn't an increase in new home sales mean existing ones are just sitting around on the market longer? Are these new people just transplants from the north? Is an increase in new home sales simply exacerbating sprawl? Just a thought. My guess would be that NC is probably doing fine as far as new home sales go.

I don't know, that was my question, the stat seems confusing without some context around it. I can just see this on some bit of advertising as a selling point when infact the place being advertised is actually losing population, and that is why in reality this stat is so high!

Now we know that NC overall is gaining in population quite rapidly, so not saying that this is what is going on here in NC, however, and interestingly, this growth is in a select number of counties; quite a few in the state are actually losing. This just highlights a common rural->urban movement seen all over, but could be one thing making that stat high. Don't know.

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What exactly does this statistic mean? If an increase in existing homes and not new ones, doesn't that just indicate shuffling, or relocation, as opposed to growth? Sorry, not being a smart ass, I must not understand something.

This is another lightweight article from the Business Journal which really doesn't say much of anything. I wish people would stop creating topics based on something they have reported because the treads with a bunch of "Oh that is great" posts.

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