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imaterry78247

When the Levees Broke

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One of the most interesting thing about the the documentry was that Louisiana does not get its fair share of oil royalties like Texas, California and Alaska. If it did this little 45K sq ft of state would be an economic powerhouse. Lets get our money back. Louisiana could be as rich as Saudi Arabia

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I watched it. One thing that stood out to me is that when the president came down to give his speech at Jackson Square, they faked that the city had power. I was furious when I found that out.

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I watched it. One thing that stood out to me is that when the president came down to give his speech at Jackson Square, they faked that the city had power. I was furious when I found that out.

Was this true, or spin by Spike Lee? Of course Spike Lee's intention with this documentary was to stir emotions, so I'd be interested in hearing that from a more reliable source. I certainly wouldn't take just Spike Lee's word for it.

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Was this true, or spin by Spike Lee? Of course Spike Lee's intention with this documentary was to stir emotions, so I'd be interested in hearing that from a more reliable source. I certainly wouldn't take just Spike Lee's word for it.

LA not getting its fair share of oil royalties was confirmed by local politician in Lousiana and by economist. Look at the infrastructure in La and the poverty and compared it to other oil rich states

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LA not getting its fair share of oil royalties was confirmed by local politician in Lousiana and by economist. Look at the infrastructure in La and the poverty and compared it to other oil rich states

My post had nothing to do with oil royalties. Please, if you're going to respond to me, at least read what I was repsonding to first.

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Personally, I think the whole racial angle has been played to death. The government response from the local to the federal level was slow, to be sure. But it just so happened that where part of the storm came in (New Orleans), and where the levee broke, happened to be densely populated, with a very high black (and poor) population. If a levee broke in another densely populated area, I'm certain the response would have been the same (assuming the majority of the citizens of that area also made little effort to get out).

Since I'm neither black, living in poverty, nor living in New Orleans I'm not going to blame anyone. I just find it hard to believe that that many able bodied adults did not have the resources (and some would say common sense) to get out when a Cat 4 storm was bearing down on their city.

I really don't care to see Spike Lee's spin on this (especially since he's a New Yorker).

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Personally, I think the whole racial angle has been played to death. The government response from the local to the federal level was slow, to be sure. But it just so happened that where part of the storm came in (New Orleans), and where the levee broke, happened to be densely populated, with a very high black (and poor) population. If a levee broke in another densely populated area, I'm certain the response would have been the same (assuming the majority of the citizens of that area also made little effort to get out).

Since I'm neither black, living in poverty, nor living in New Orleans I'm not going to blame anyone. I just find it hard to believe that that many able bodied adults did not have the resources (and some would say common sense) to get out when a Cat 4 storm was bearing down on their city.

I really don't care to see Spike Lee's spin on this (especially since he's a New Yorker).

Not that I'm a particular defender of Spike Lee (liked his Nike ads way more than most of his movies...LOL), but should I be asking where you're from, so I can tell whether or not I should disregard your opinion? LOL J/K

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Not that I'm a particular defender of Spike Lee (liked his Nike ads way more than most of his movies...LOL), but should I be asking where you're from, so I can tell whether or not I should disregard your opinion? LOL J/K

The question of oil royalties is part of the cycle of poverty, race relations, levees and a strong economy base for it citiizens. I think N.O and LA. has been shortchanged in that respect. Spike Lee's doc's is the opinion of a lot of its citiizen , not all but it is very pertinent to the recovery of N.O. and the GulF Coast. Some people need to connect the dots between oil royalties(CASH for the state) , poverty, crime and corruptions and the culture that persist in the one of America' greatest city. this doc is to make you think one way or the other but a lot of things needs to be addressed in the area

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New Orleans is a great historic city, but it has had a large population who have relied too much on the goverment for help. Corrupt police, politics, poor schools, and the general lack of intrest over the years to try to correct these problems have led to a dysfunctional state of affairs. Even the poorest of the population have the ability to make positive life decisions. I am sick and tired of the Katrina story, sorry.

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Not that I'm a particular defender of Spike Lee (liked his Nike ads way more than most of his movies...LOL), but should I be asking where you're from, so I can tell whether or not I should disregard your opinion? LOL J/K

Where I'm from is irrelevant, as I'm not making a controversial 3 hour HBO movie about New Orleans and it's post-Katrina aftermath. That's a big difference from writing an opinion on an urban message board.

Actually, I liked "Do The Right Thing". But I can not take anyone's documentary seriously who has gone on record as stating that the levees were purposely blown up. Lee is an attention starved race baiter; at least if he were a New Orleans based, attention-starved race baiter, his film would have a little more legitimacy, at least to me.

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But I can not take anyone's documentary seriously who has gone on record as stating that the levees were purposely blown up.

:rolleyes: Of all the conspiracy theories, this one not only is laughable but also makes me angry. To know American citizens can be brainwashed so easily by a few "community leaders" is absolutely disturbing.

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For readers of this forum... if you decide that you are indeed tired of the Katrina story, or you generally have grown to hate New Orleans and its people... as seems to be the en vogue thing to do these days, just don't post here. It's offensive and pisses New Orleanians off... ya know, the good ones... all 99.9999% of us.

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For readers of this forum... if you decide that you are indeed tired of the Katrina story, or you generally have grown to hate New Orleans and its people... as seems to be the en vogue thing to do these days, just don't post here. It's offensive and pisses New Orleanians off... ya know, the good ones... all 99.9999% of us.

Agreed.

What's worse, to me at least, is when people post responses like "sad.. sad... opinions" without even clarifying what they're talking about or offering something worthwhile to the discussion.

I'm sure we all know what "they" say about opinions... and we all have them. Opinions abound, as do ridiculous conspiracy theories.

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I cant beleive some of the posts that I'm reading on this topic. Spike Lee said very few words in this documentary, which is a good thing. He let the actual evacuees that were effected by the storm tell their side of the story. They all came from different walks of life, but shared the same common story. The goverment did little if anything to assists the city and surrounding areas in a time of need. Atleast watch the document before you comment on this topic. Maybe you might learn something.

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I cant beleive some of the posts that I'm reading on this topic. Spike Lee said very few words in this documentary, which is a good thing. He let the actual evacuees that were effected by the storm tell their side of the story. They all came from different walks of life, but shared the same common story. The goverment did little if anything to assists the city and surrounding areas in a time of need. Atleast watch the document before you comment on this topic. Maybe you might learn something.

If I wish to "learn something", it's not going to be from a man who insinuates that the levees were blown up.

Even if it is just a brief part of the film, that is enough for me.

According to a review I read:

"In what is sure to be the most controversial part of the film, Lee gives weight to rampant rumors in the city's African-American community, that the levee protecting the largely black Lower Ninth Ward was blown up by the government. He compares it to a decision made to dynamite a levee near a poor neighborhood during Mississippi River flooding in 1927, to spare upscale neighborhoods. The only problem with that bit of history is that the levee was in largely white St. Bernard's Parish."

And here is another review/article on the film by commentator Star Parker (who happens to be black):

http://www.urbancure.org/dev/pagedetails.asp?SubCatID=333

What happened in New Orleans and Mississippi was a devastating natural disaster. The response was (and still is) slower than what it should be. But I don't need to hear Spike Lee politicize it. It is the politicizing of the disaster that people are tired of, not of the disaster itself. All Americans want to see New Orleans cleaned up and rebuilt. How it is rebuilt will be up to the people of New Orleans. Hopefully, there will be minimal politicizing (especially regarding race) in that regard.

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If I wish to "learn something", it's not going to be from a man who insinuates that the levees were blown up.

Even if it is just a brief part of the film, that is enough for me.

According to a review I read:

"In what is sure to be the most controversial part of the film, Lee gives weight to rampant rumors in the city's African-American community, that the levee protecting the largely black Lower Ninth Ward was blown up by the government. He compares it to a decision made to dynamite a levee near a poor neighborhood during Mississippi River flooding in 1927, to spare upscale neighborhoods. The only problem with that bit of history is that the levee was in largely white St. Bernard's Parish."

And here is another review/article on the film by commentator Star Parker (who happens to be black):

http://www.urbancure.org/dev/pagedetails.asp?SubCatID=333

What happened in New Orleans and Mississippi was a devastating natural disaster. The response was (and still is) slower than what it should be. But I don't need to hear Spike Lee politicize it. It is the politicizing of the disaster that people are tired of, not of the disaster itself. All Americans want to see New Orleans cleaned up and rebuilt. How it is rebuilt will be up to the people of New Orleans. Hopefully, there will be minimal politicizing (especially regarding race) in that regard.

I wish everyone would take the time to watch the documentary before they pass judgment on it.

The documentary has sharp criticism on Nagan. African American author and radio host, Michael Dyson attacked Nagin for knowing Saturday about the severity of the storm and first contacting the business community leaders before talking to community leaders.

An African American Congresswomen attacked Nagin for his failure to organize emergency personnel, instruct the police department and his evacuation efforts.

The documentary also had African Americans that said that they did not believe that levees wore blown up. It touched on how blowing the levees has been in urban legend since hurricane Betsy hit and the community believed that the levees were blown up to keep the lakeshore community from being flooded. It also said that the results of the flooding (whether on purpose or not) the effected more whites than blacks and even if the were blown up, it would not have been because of racism.

It talked to a white lawyer whose office was without power and saw the President

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If I wish to "learn something", it's not going to be from a man who insinuates that the levees were blown up.

Even if it is just a brief part of the film, that is enough for me.

According to a review I read:

"In what is sure to be the most controversial part of the film, Lee gives weight to rampant rumors in the city's African-American community, that the levee protecting the largely black Lower Ninth Ward was blown up by the government. He compares it to a decision made to dynamite a levee near a poor neighborhood during Mississippi River flooding in 1927, to spare upscale neighborhoods. The only problem with that bit of history is that the levee was in largely white St. Bernard's Parish."

And here is another review/article on the film by commentator Star Parker (who happens to be black):

http://www.urbancure.org/dev/pagedetails.asp?SubCatID=333

What happened in New Orleans and Mississippi was a devastating natural disaster. The response was (and still is) slower than what it should be. But I don't need to hear Spike Lee politicize it. It is the politicizing of the disaster that people are tired of, not of the disaster itself. All Americans want to see New Orleans cleaned up and rebuilt. How it is rebuilt will be up to the people of New Orleans. Hopefully, there will be minimal politicizing (especially regarding race) in that regard.

Flotown, you really need to watch that documentary. Because if you did you would know as soon as the people of that believed that conspiracy theory, there were actual engineering experts and historicans on there that proved it to be wrong. People are going to believe they want to believe regardless of the topic where it is the truth or not, but get both sides of the story before you go casting judgement.

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FYI, both acts of "When the Levees Broke" will be playing on HBO Family this afternoon starting at 3:45 and ending at 6:00. HBO Family is channel 504 if you have Directv.

I haven't watched more than 10 minutes if the documentary yet, and that's why I haven't even commented about it in this thread. I'll watch it eventually, but right now I can't just sit back and watch 2-3 hours of Katrina catastrophe stuff, it's still pretty tough to handle.

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For readers of this forum... if you decide that you are indeed tired of the Katrina story, or you generally have grown to hate New Orleans and its people... as seems to be the en vogue thing to do these days, just don't post here. It's offensive and pisses New Orleanians off... ya know, the good ones... all 99.9999% of us.

Real Talk. For those of you that hate New Orleans, New Orleans hates you too. :shades: I'll definitely check it out.

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^ Agreed.

New Orleans is an excellent city, and I never have seen so much hatred toward any once city in my life as what has been shown by outsiders since Katrina. As an outsider to New Orleans myself, I absolutely adore that city and can't wait to get back down there.

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I love the documentary. I just wish they wouldve got more in depth with peoples situations after Katrina.

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I actually liked the documentary. While he did largely ignore most of the devastated areas, like Lakeview, Gentilly and N.O. East, it was pretty good. I certainly wouldn't call it the quintessential Katrina documentary because of the many areas ignored. With 4 hours, he should have highlighted these areas as well.

I honestly don't think there are any racial undertones in the documentary. I was impressed and relieved by that. Truth be told, in Katrina, more white households lost their homes in metro New Orleans by a wide margin. It's a shame he ignored these areas, but I guess that wasn't the intent of his documentary.

It focused more on direct human suffering. And in that category, our black residents certainly suffered immensely during and after the storm, as it was they who stayed.

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