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michaelskis

What are the Oldest Buildings in Grand Rapids?

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I was just wondering what is the oldest commercial building in Grand Rapids? What about the oldest residential building? What is the condition like?

What old buildings do you like? Do you know its stories? (Photo

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I was just wondering what is the oldest commercial building in Grand Rapids? What about the oldest residential building? What is the condition like?

What old buildings do you like? Do you know its stories? (Photo

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I was just wondering what is the oldest commercial building in Grand Rapids? What about the oldest residential building? What is the condition like?

What old buildings do you like? Do you know its stories? (Photo

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Oldest building: Calkins Law Office, 235 State SE. Original location near Monroe Center and Ottawa. Moved to present site in 1971. Now owned by Grand Rapids Public Museum.

All part of the brochure I'm working to finish up...

What about some buildings that are in their original locations?

The Heritage Hill Association's website has a mapping project:

http://www.heritagehillweb.org/Search/mapping_project.htm

The information is limited to the houses that were on a tour.

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What about some buildings that are in their original locations?

The information is limited to the houses that were on a tour.

It actually lists all the houses in Heritage Hill, but notes the ones that have been on the tour.

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All part of the brochure I'm working to finish up...

Faster, Faster........sterb022.gif

Just kidding

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Oldest building: Calkins Law Office, 235 State SE. Original location near Monroe Center and Ottawa. Moved to present site in 1971. Now owned by Grand Rapids Public Museum.

All part of the brochure I'm working to finish up...

I think the original construction date on the law office is 1836.

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It actually lists all the houses in Heritage Hill, but notes the ones that have been on the tour.

I ment the homes on the tour are the only ones that provide any real information has to the history of the home.

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I think the block north of the art museum was built in the 1860's or 1870's, as was the Karl Building (Two Choppers) in the next block. I understood those to be some of the oldest buildings in GR.

I have a cup full of old nails from the rehab of the Karl Building. I'm amazed when I imagine a carpenter hammering them that might have recently returned from the Civil War.

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Faster, Faster........sterb022.gif

Just kidding

I'm finalizing photo selections. Tweaking summaries. I'm off to grab a couple of stragglers. Soon, soon.

I have a 1835 construction date for the Calkins Law Office.

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I remember reading a plaque saying that the building, Justice & Monroe, is the second oldest building still standing in GR.

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In terms of old buildings that are still carrying out their original purpose... Built in 1880, Coit School in Belknap Lookout is the oldest operating school in the state of Michigan

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Built in 1856 the location of the One Trick Pony on Fulton has been certified as the oldest continually occupied business in Grand Rapids.

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I don't think any exhists, but I remember once reading about reminents of the Hopewell Native Americans and their living quarters here in GR. I'm not quite sure on the building principals of this tribe and what to look for. It would be interesting to find reminents of their building techniques, especially along side the banks of The Grand River -- I would assume that would qualify as really old residential units.

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What about the Church on Division where Lyon(?) dead ends into Division?

St. Marks Episcopal Church - Corner of Division and Pearl = 1848

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What about the Church on Division where Lyon(?) dead ends into Division?

Do you mean St. Marks? Their site mentions that although the parish was incorporated in 1836, the church building wasn't complete until 1848.

Although it itsn't mentioned in their history, I might have read somewhere that the original facade was constructed out of stone from the Grand River. Apparently it didn't wear very well as it was too soft and had to be replaced. I thought it was St. Marks, but I'm not positive.

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Built in 1856 the location of the One Trick Pony on Fulton has been certified as the oldest continually occupied business in Grand Rapids.

The buildings that houses One Trick Pony, are historically significant, as the taproom was originally Oliver Bleak's General Store, built in 1856 and has been certified as the oldest continually occupied business in Grand Rapids. The east building was built in 1885, and was the home of H.A. Wilson's and T.W. Dwight Upholstery and Tack Shop. All in all, these old walls have played host to 17 different businesses over the years, from a dressmaker, a dry cleaner, a radio & music repair shop, meat market, and tourist association. The signs throughout the building pay tribute to those businesses who have helped shape early Grand Rapids.

Source:http://www.onetrick.biz/

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Do you mean St. Marks? Their site mentions that although the parish was incorporated in 1836, the church building wasn't complete until 1848.

Although it itsn't mentioned in their history, I might have read somewhere that the original facade was constructed out of stone from the Grand River. Apparently it didn't wear very well as it was too soft and had to be replaced. I thought it was St. Marks, but I'm not positive.

That's what I heard too. I heard it was Limestone from the Grand? I havehave no idea if that makes geological sense...any rock hounds out there?

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That's what I heard too. I heard it was Limestone from the Grand? I havehave no idea if that makes geological sense...any rock hounds out there?

Ok, I found the story about it in the book 'Grand Rapids Then and Now'. The church was originally built out of limestone from the Grand River, but began deteriorating later in the 19th century so a stucco covering was added. In 1957, the stucco coat was removed and the original limestone walls were restored which can be seen today.

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38 W Fulton, the Fulton-Commerce building was the first commercial building built south of Fulton. It was orignally home to the Leonard family farm, which then they built H. Leonard & Son's.

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That's what I heard too. I heard it was Limestone from the Grand?

I havehave no idea if that makes geological sense...any rock hounds out there?

A lot of buildings/houses were built out of Limestone from the Grand River.

You would see this on Front Ave, but oh yeah, those stupid people decided

a highway through the center of the city was a better idea.

I hate 131 for knocking down such beautiful structures.

No longer here:

214181999_f4745ce13f.jpg

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A lot of buildings/houses were built out of Limestone from the Grand River.

You would see this on Front Ave, but oh yeah, those stupid people decided

a highway through the center of the city was a better idea.

I hate 131 for knocking down such beautiful structures.

It is such a shame that so many buildings were leveled in the name of Urban Renewal. I think that is one of the many reasons that I am interested in knowing the history of buildings and locations. Development is not going to stop and buildings will be destroyed... it is important that we take pride in them while they are still here.

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