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microtuskegee

Public Health & Healthcare in Alabama

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Macon County gets Urgent Care for the first time in 20 years!!!

The Thomas Reed Ambulatory Care Center in Tuskegee Alabama has opened its doors for the first time to see patiants. This is a new state of the art facility in the Alabama black belt region that is geared towards the healthcare of Macon County and the black belt area. Macon county has been without healthcare for the last 20 years after the closing of the John A. Andrew Hospital in Tuskegee

The Recruitable communities project of the Tuskegee Health Education Center participated in its first P.A.O.F. (Physicians

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Macon County gets Urgent Care for the first time in 20 years!!!

Great news for Tuskegee and that part of the Alabama Black Belt. I hope this leads to more health care professionals coming to the area.

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The under-service and lack of access to healthcare in the rural south, esp. in areas like the "Black Belt", a serious problem that has yet to be fully addressed or remedied. Its good to hear that Tuskegee and Macon are getting a health care facility that will serve not only it, but the local area as well. Really great development.

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Macon County gets Urgent Care for the first time in 20 years!!!

The Thomas Reed Ambulatory Care Center in Tuskegee Alabama has opened its doors for the first time to see patiants. This is a new state of the art facility in the Alabama black belt region that is geared towards the healthcare of Macon County and the black belt area. Macon county has been without healthcare for the last 20 years after the closing of the John A. Andrew Hospital in Tuskegee

The Recruitable communities project of the Tuskegee Health Education Center participated in its first P.A.O.F. (Physicians

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Alabama gets fatter, No. 2 in country, report says

The state ranked No. 2 in the nation, behind Mississippi, in obesity rates, said the report by the Trust for America's Health, a public health advocacy group. A total of 28.7 percent of Alabama's adults were obese during 2003-2005, an increase of 1.1 percent from the previous three-year reporting period of 2001-2004.

This is not a surprise in a state that believes that the automobile is king and is so anti-urbanism. Outside most cities in this state there few to no sideways or bike trails. We just live in out own little worlds hidden away in the suburbs far, far away from the city. At the rate, we are going we'll probably be #1 soon if massive changes aren't made to fix our obession with automobiles.

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Well, you gotta realize. I'm 6'1", 175 Ibs. and I am considered obese, so, really, the statistics can't always be that accurate. Though I'm sure that we are one of the fattest states.

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Well, you gotta realize. I'm 6'1", 175 Ibs. and I am considered obese, so, really, the statistics can't always be that accurate. Though I'm sure that we are one of the fattest states.

Not one of but the second fattest in the country and that's certainly not a statistic to be proud of. I think the blame as someone mentioned before is over emphasis on the automobile and not enough on urbanism.

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Not one of but the second fattest in the country and that's certainly not a statistic to be proud of. I think the blame as someone mentioned before is over emphasis on the automobile and not enough on urbanism.

I meant, you can't seriously tell what a persons body fat percentage is just by doing weight, height, etc.... measurements and electronic screening. People often think of obese as being enormously over weight, when the actual term they should use for that is morbidly obese.

I never said I was proud of the statistic, I'm just saying that, well, just because they nation tells you you're obese does not warrent your death or mean you outstandingly fat. My great aunt lived to be 104 she was 5'4" and wight about 220 Ibs. Not to say she wouldn't've lived longer if she'd been thinner, but, saying you're obese does not mean that you eat everything within reach, and have to have some kind of can to walk around. There are people on the cross country team at my high school that are obese, same thing with cheerleaders, band members, none hulky football players, soccer players, basketball players, danceline/colorgaurd.

It's not a good thing to be obese, I'm just trying to tell yah that it's not as bad as the media or popular culture makes it out to be.

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I think the blame as someone mentioned before is over emphasis on the automobile and not enough on urbanism.

Well, plenty of other states have just as much emphasis on the automobile & every bit as little "urbanism."

Notice the same states on the "fat" list are on the "poverty" list, the "low average educational attainment" lists, and the list of "states with highest % of black residents."

There's not a nice way to say that, but look at the lists. A lot of it has to do with national policies from generations past. There's a "lag time" for their standard of living (health, education, money) to catch up.

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Well, plenty of other states have just as much emphasis on the automobile & every bit as little "urbanism."

Notice the same states on the "fat" list are on the "poverty" list, the "low average educational attainment" lists, and the list of "states with highest % of black residents."

There's not a nice way to say that, but look at the lists. A lot of it has to do with national policies from generations past. There's a "lag time" for their standard of living (health, education, money) to catch up.

I've always noticed that. That's just another reason for our state to try to prove the statistics wrong when it comes to those things. Alabama is going to have to play major catch-up, if we ever want to taken seriously.

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I meant, you can't seriously tell what a persons body fat percentage is just by doing weight, height, etc.... measurements and electronic screening. People often think of obese as being enormously over weight, when the actual term they should use for that is morbidly obese.

I never said I was proud of the statistic, I'm just saying that, well, just because they nation tells you you're obese does not warrent your death or mean you outstandingly fat. My great aunt lived to be 104 she was 5'4" and wight about 220 Ibs. Not to say she wouldn't've lived longer if she'd been thinner, but, saying you're obese does not mean that you eat everything within reach, and have to have some kind of can to walk around. There are people on the cross country team at my high school that are obese, same thing with cheerleaders, band members, none hulky football players, soccer players, basketball players, danceline/colorgaurd.

It's not a good thing to be obese, I'm just trying to tell yah that it's not as bad as the media or popular culture makes it out to be.

It's ok to accept the rankings, which are probably more accurate than you give credit for. You just have to move forward from it and push your government to do something about. This may not be the site in which to do that, but, since the article is relevant to urbanism, good ideas will form about what to do about this problem. Obesity is a disease and epidemic, and you are correct, it is misleading as well. A body builder would be considered obese with a body mass index of 30 even though he or she may have 5 percent body fat. I do not know under what terms or conditions this study was performed. Were they looking at exercise performance, amount of time in school children exercise, counting how many "fat people" they see on the streets, or what?

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It's ok to accept the rankings, which are probably more accurate than you give credit for. You just have to move forward from it and push your government to do something about. This may not be the site in which to do that, but, since the article is relevant to urbanism, good ideas will form about what to do about this problem. Obesity is a disease and epidemic, and you are correct, it is misleading as well. A body builder would be considered obese with a body mass index of 30 even though he or she may have 5 percent body fat. I do not know under what terms or conditions this study was performed. Were they looking at exercise performance, amount of time in school children exercise, counting how many "fat people" they see on the streets, or what?

The state has greatly improved the schools' lunch menues though. I still can't stand them, but, at least I know that when I'm eating it, it's better for me than last year's food was. So, I really don't mind. But steps still need to be made.

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This is not a surprise in a state that believes that the automobile is king and is so anti-urbanism. Outside most cities in this state there few to no sideways or bike trails. We just live in out own little worlds hidden away in the suburbs far, far away from the city. At the rate, we are going we'll probably be #1 soon if massive changes aren't made to fix our obession with automobiles.

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I think stats like these are more attributable to rural poverty in states like Alabama (and my own), particularly among the Black population. The state has to care enough to try to bring some type of prosperity into these areas, or integrate them (more) into surrounding metro areas, for starters.

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Well, you gotta realize. I'm 6'1", 175 Ibs. and I am considered obese, so, really, the statistics can't always be that accurate. Though I'm sure that we are one of the fattest states.

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I think stats like these are more attributable to rural poverty in states like Alabama (and my own), particularly among the Black population. The state has to care enough to try to bring some type of prosperity into these areas, or integrate them (more) into surrounding metro areas, for starters.

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I think stats like these are more attributable to rural poverty in states like Alabama (and my own), particularly among the Black population. The state has to care enough to try to bring some type of prosperity into these areas, or integrate them (more) into surrounding metro areas, for starters.

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