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DCMetroRaleigh

Poll: Americans want to live in CA, Hawaii, FL, and NC

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While a survey of ~3.7k people is a large sum, it still leaves a gigantic room for error. It's no wonder cities and states don't seem to stay consistent year to year. I also find it odd that Miami did not make the list. Despite it being a "retirement city," it seems to a very socially healthy answer. It sounds cooler than saying Denver. However, on that note, seems that NC wouldn't make the list if that truely were the case and people answer based on social norms.

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While a survey of ~3.7k people is a large sum, it still leaves a gigantic room for error. It's no wonder citys and states don't seem to stay consistent year to year. I also find it odd that Miami did not make the list. Despite it being a "retirement city," it seems to a very socially healthy answer. It sounds cooler than saying Denver. However, on that note, seems that NC wouldn't make the list if that truely were the case and people answer based on social norms.

I think the perception of NC is finally changing.

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Actually the poll is scientific and probably very accurate. Harris polls are considered very reliable. North Carolina has become an extremely popular dream destination for many, as Census figures indicate. People are moving in droves for a reason.

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Not much of a surprise to me anymore. I often visit the forums on city-data.com --which are forums for people moving to get info from the locals. The North Carolina forum is by far the busiest on the site!

It's really funny to read some of the posts from northerners, especially. There's a lot about NC they don't understand! :wacko:

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We are not suprised. Practically every third license plate you see is from somewhere else. And every other person I meet is from somewhere else. Especially the northern cities. NYC, Philly, Washington D.C.

They are finally discovering what we have known for years, North Carolina is a great place to live. :)

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There is something disturbing about our national character if collectively, more people want to live in Vegas than Denver, Chicago, or Boston.

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And every other person I meet is from somewhere else. Especially the northern cities. NYC, Philly, Washington D.C.

I know exactly what you mean...this at times, can be just crazy.

I can't tell you the number of times my significant other and I have been to parties/dinners/etc here in Raleigh where we were the ONLY NC natives there! :wacko:

To admit you were born and raised in North Carolina....these days, people look at you like "Wow! I've never met one of those!!" :rofl:

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I also find it odd that Miami did not make the list. Despite it being a "retirement city," it seems to a very socially healthy answer. It sounds cooler than saying Denver. However, on that note, seems that NC wouldn't make the list if that truely were the case and people answer based on social norms.

I think many people would choose Denver over Miami......but it might just be the people I know. I would think Denver would be more popular, especially for the outdoors, mountains, clean and green feel Colorado and Denver area has. Not to mention the skiing, cycling and good beer !!! I guess it is just me. I travel to both and if you told me I had to move to Miami, I might change jobs but if you told me I had to move to Denver, I might just go. Now Denver is not my favorite city in the world by any means, but I could live there.

I don't know many people who would move to Miami if they had a choice and the ones I know that did move to Miami, moved back or even moved to Colorado. Again, might be my contacts.

JMHO

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Tayfromcarolina I totally agree.

Those of us who live/have lived in N.C. aren't surprised by this statistic at all. You couldn't ask for a more lovely place to live. With opportunity knocking at many many doors, plentiful jobs and a welcoming/warm social atmosphere, N.C. was bound to become a top state.

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I think many people would choose Denver over Miami......but it might just be the people I know. I would think Denver would be more popular, especially for the outdoors, mountains, clean and green feel Colorado and Denver area has. Not to mention the skiing, cycling and good beer !!! I guess it is just me. I travel to both and if you told me I had to move to Miami, I might change jobs but if you told me I had to move to Denver, I might just go. Now Denver is not my favorite city in the world by any means, but I could live there.

I don't know many people who would move to Miami if they had a choice and the ones I know that did move to Miami, moved back or even moved to Colorado. Again, might be my contacts.

JMHO

Miami is too hot, no seasons. If I had to move elsewhere, it would be Boston, Denver, Seattle, or Chicago. New York City would also be nice.

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Miami is too hot, no seasons. If I had to move elsewhere, it would be Boston, Denver, Seattle, or Chicago. New York City would also be nice.

Well, trying not to stick to the miami subject too long, it really depends on where you grew up and how you were conditioned to weather really. To a lot of people NC gets too hot. I was born and raised down near Jax, FL which is probably the reason why I didn't mind the weather in Ft Lauderdale when staying with my brother over the course of several summers when I was younger. I don't get why many retirees from up north move there, it's no wonder so many people die of heat stroke, they're used to 0C in the winter.

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Tayfromcarolina I totally agree.

Those of us who live/have lived in N.C. aren't surprised by this statistic at all. You couldn't ask for a more lovely place to live. With opportunity knocking at many many doors, plentiful jobs and a welcoming/warm social atmosphere, N.C. was bound to become a top state.

Hear hear!

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As far as east coast states go, we arguably got the best chunk of scenery, with the Outer Banks and the tallest portion of mountains in eastern North America. That probably is a factor.

Note that the other four top states are big on travel spots too.

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Not much of a surprise to me anymore. I often visit the forums on city-data.com --which are forums for people moving to get info from the locals. The North Carolina forum is by far the busiest on the site!

It's really funny to read some of the posts from northerners, especially. There's a lot about NC they don't understand! :wacko:

I decided to check out the site and you're right, some of the questions are hilarious.

"What kind of insects are in NC?" :rofl:

But a lot of what was said pissed me off too. There seemed to be a lot of tension there between Southerners and Yankees. What especially annoyed me was transplant Yankees who came here and had made threads/posts beotching about various things about our state. <_<

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But a lot of what was said pissed me off too. There seemed to be a lot of tension there between Southerners and Yankees. What especially annoyed me was transplant Yankees who came here and had made threads/posts beotching about various things about our state. <_<

Yeah those folks get tiring...I try to ignore them best I can. Also, it's amazing the number of them that automatically look for brand-new houses in some new suburban subdivision out in far-off areas like Apex, Wake Forest, Holly Springs, etc....they never even bother to look IN the cities of Raleigh or Durham (or whatever major city is in the area they're looking at) hardly! I guess northerners who appreciate urban living tend to stay up there in the big cities while we get mostly the suburban leftovers. :P

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Practically every third license plate you see is from somewhere else.

That's true. Walk through the lot beside my building and you'll find Texas, New York, California, Pennsylvania. Actually, we just changed out our MA plates for an NC plate two months ago.

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Yeah those folks get tiring...I try to ignore them best I can. Also, it's amazing the number of them that automatically look for brand-new houses in some new suburban subdivision out in far-off areas like Apex, Wake Forest, Holly Springs, etc....they never even bother to look IN the cities of Raleigh or Durham (or whatever major city is in the area they're looking at) hardly! I guess northerners who appreciate urban living tend to stay up there in the big cities while we get mostly the suburban leftovers. :P

That's true actually. Well, for the most part anyway. Northerners who enjoy (and can afford) urban living in their respective cities wouldn't leave for smaller up-and-coming cities in the south like Raleigh or Durham. It's people in and around those cities who want to get away from it all and find somewhere completely different.

I'm sure there are plenty of folks in Philadelphia, Cleveland, New York, Boston and Buffalo who would give up their old house and tiny yard (even though they can probably walk or take the bus to work) for a brand new home on a quiet street that's three times the size. And even though they have to drive everywhere, they'll never have to shovel themselves out, and even though we have traffic here, it'll never be as bad as it was where they came from (that's what they think anyway).

Although they are quite common in these parts, residential areas found in Holly Springs, Apex, North Raleigh and Cary are very uncommon in most northern metros. Why? Because those cities and their first few rings of suburbs were developed before the first half of the 20th century was over. For example, I grew up in a town about 20 minutes outside downtown Boston that was established in 1727.

This transplant decided to look IN the city of Durham and not in some cookie-cutter community in the exurbs. But I am indeed in the minority.

All this writing about the north makes me want to go back up there. There's nothing sadder than having no one to hi-five when Tom Brady throws a touchdown pass.

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No real surprise here, as newcomers are coming in droves. I am a bit disappointed and surprised that Virginia didn't make the list. The northerners and westerners who are moving here tend to come from the socialist loony liberal areas where density/smart growth/welfare state social engineering is the goal. The fastest growing states are free wheeling areas where growth and prosperity and improved standard of living are the goal, such as Georgia, N.C., and Va. Virginia recently ranked #1 in best in business place in Forbes. It also ranks low in tax burden compared to the welfare states up north. Really a shock to me they didn't make the top 10.

As long as N.C. and GA. continue to facilitate the American dream, and don't veer off onto smart growth's utopian agenda, they will continue to do well. The vast majority of people are moving to N.C.'s suburban/exurban areas, they want that quality of life, and they will stop coming if they can't get it.

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Actually NC had the 2nd highest drop in median income of all of the states over the last 6 years. The American dream these days is limited to just a few.

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No real surprise here, as newcomers are coming in droves. I am a bit disappointed and surprised that Virginia didn't make the list. The northerners and westerners who are moving here tend to come from the socialist loony liberal areas where density/smart growth/welfare state social engineering is the goal.

Actually many are coming here from places that simply have declining economies/limited economic opportunities or that have relatively high costs of living. The correlation you are attempting to make simply does not exist and I think you fail to take history and geography into account. If density and smart growth are supposedly "liberal social engineering" policies, why was it the default mode of development for the vast majority of our nation's history?

I also don't think I would consider sitting hours on end in gridlock, increasing air pollution, disappearing farmland, and impending water shortages "the American dream."

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No real surprise here, as newcomers are coming in droves. I am a bit disappointed and surprised that Virginia didn't make the list. The northerners and westerners who are moving here tend to come from the socialist loony liberal areas where density/smart growth/welfare state social engineering is the goal. The fastest growing states are free wheeling areas where growth and prosperity and improved standard of living are the goal, such as Georgia, N.C., and Va. Virginia recently ranked #1 in best in business place in Forbes. It also ranks low in tax burden compared to the welfare states up north. Really a shock to me they didn't make the top 10.

As long as N.C. and GA. continue to facilitate the American dream, and don't veer off onto smart growth's utopian agenda, they will continue to do well. The vast majority of people are moving to N.C.'s suburban/exurban areas, they want that quality of life, and they will stop coming if they can't get it.

Please name the standards of living in which NC is ahead of states with higher levels of regulation. Please show examples. I expect you will have trouble because other than housing affordability, NC remains way behind most of the northeast and the west in standard of living indicators.

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