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GR_Urbanist

GrandLAN Opens In Keeler Building

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(If this isnt really front page worthy, please move to Coffee House)

The address is 56 N. Division.

This looks really cool and Im sure its going to get tons of business now that all the universities are in full swing. :thumbsup:

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Snoog, we could have been superstars downtown. If only snoog.... if only.....

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GRAH, a buddy and I were just talking about doing something similar to this, though not a full-out LAN center. I love ULX on Leondard (still pretty much DT, just not core) too much to want to compete with them. I will definately have to check it out tho, see what their setup is. One plus ULX has is their 20 foot projection screen they run DDR on, so GrandLAN will have to have something to at least match up, seeing as how I believe ULX has already done considerable advertising amongst college students.

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Snoog, we could have been superstars downtown. If only snoog.... if only.....

:rofl: This is peculiar...

Although now that I've aged a bit, this seems a wee bit too immature for a man like me :P

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Wow, thanks for the big announcement!

Yeah, we opened down here. We are just starting to take off.

Hoping the walking distance location helps.

edit: unauthorized advertising of services is prohibited on this site. See the UrbanPlanet rules for more information.

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Whoops, sorry for the unauthorized marketing. I am the owner of GrandLAN. As an entrepreneur, it's tough to get myself out of the constant marketing mindset.

Anyway. I was just very happy to see my place become a topic. I am available to answer any questions.

Slater - look forward to hearing your take on the place.

Thanks

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O.K. call me old but what is it that this place does? A place to play video games? Isn't that called an arcade?

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Thanks for the question! It is playing video games.

The differences between the way we do it and an arcade are:

- all computers are networked for group play

- each computer has installed and plays all the games

- you rent time on the computer - you don't play by the game

- each computer also has the full microsoft office suite (i.e. do schoolwork, work work)

- each computer can log onto and surf the internet

- all computers are networked to the internet for over the internet game play

I have heard gaming centers refered to as arcades or I have heard them refered to as cyber cafes... they are a little of each...

Does that answer your question? Let me know.

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Welcome GrandLAN!

I walked by your place on Saturday on my way to the Artist Market on S Division. The place looks great & I wish you great success.

-TripleG

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things like these are all over asia... specificly in Korea (pretty much at least two or three per main intersection and a great deal more spread between city blocks). There, they're called "PC Rooms" (pc bang).

In Japan, called Manga Cafes (manga kissa), their roll is slightly more diverse... in which they not only have all the cool stuff for gamers... but offer food to order, drinks, private booths with sofas, comics, CDs, movies... pretty much ANY kind of media... and even showers for people who decide to stay the night in a booth for whatever reason. They aren't as abundant as PC Bangs in korea, but are all over the place.

Since we're talking straight to the main potato in this thread... what do you think about the services offered at Manga Cafes? Think something like that would fly in the US? Or more specificly, smaller markets like GR?

Manga Kissa

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things like these are all over asia... specificly in Korea (pretty much at least two or three per main intersection and a great deal more spread between city blocks). There, they're called "PC Rooms" (pc bang).

In Japan, called Manga Cafes (manga kissa), their roll is slightly more diverse... in which they not only have all the cool stuff for gamers... but offer food to order, drinks, private booths with sofas, comics, CDs, movies... pretty much ANY kind of media... and even showers for people who decide to stay the night in a booth for whatever reason. They aren't as abundant as PC Bangs in korea, but are all over the place.

Since we're talking straight to the main potato in this thread... what do you think about the services offered at Manga Cafes? Think something like that would fly in the US? Or more specificly, smaller markets like GR?

Manga Kissa

Showers?!?!?

What, no private bedrooms?

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Showers?!?!?

What, no private bedrooms?

hotels in japan are rediculously expensive, so a lot of times people will just pay the 3-4 bucks an hour and crash in one of these booths. Or, people will just go there all night and hang out.

wouldn't you want to be fresh in the morning?

no private bed rooms.

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I went to a few PC bangs while I was in Seoul. It was about $1/hour, and a great way to get out of my friend's cramped apartment. I guess it can be a bit of a social problem over there, sort of like doing drugs. Some people have died of exhaustion after playing video games for like 48 hours straight.

The concept might have a tougher time in the US where people tend to stay home to play games and use the computer. But, I think something like that would be great for a bachelor party or something. I used to have a blast while I was at GVSU working in the computer labs. A bunch of us lab assistants started a computer gaming club and took over some labs on Saturday afternoons playing Counter-Strike and a number of other games.

-nb

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I've never heard of Manga Kissa before, but that sounds really cool. Considering how obsessive a lot of gamers can be, I could see it doing well, too. The food and suchstuff could also help bring in extra revenue from gamers and others as well. I didn't get a chance to check out GrandLAN today due to the rain, but such a concept would be really cool to see if it proves to be profitable, and would help the otherwise sleepy nature of downtown in the later hours.

I do know that at ULX, often people beg and plead for the hours to be extended for many reasons, sometimes sucessfully. I would imagine it happens at other gaming centers as well. I also know that at least snacks and drink are nearly a must-have for gaming centers.

The whole booth idea I could really see myself using. Often times when I get done DJ'ing at ULX, or just hanging out around DT, I drive to Meijer at 54th and sleep in my car until morning so as to not wake the whole house up. A booth downtown that I could plug my pc into... what more could a gamer ever need?

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I've never heard of Manga Kissa before, but that sounds really cool. Considering how obsessive a lot of gamers can be, I could see it doing well, too. The food and suchstuff could also help bring in extra revenue from gamers and others as well. I didn't get a chance to check out GrandLAN today due to the rain, but such a concept would be really cool to see if it proves to be profitable, and would help the otherwise sleepy nature of downtown in the later hours.

I do know that at ULX, often people beg and plead for the hours to be extended for many reasons, sometimes sucessfully. I would imagine it happens at other gaming centers as well. I also know that at least snacks and drink are nearly a must-have for gaming centers.

The whole booth idea I could really see myself using. Often times when I get done DJ'ing at ULX, or just hanging out around DT, I drive to Meijer at 54th and sleep in my car until morning so as to not wake the whole house up. A booth downtown that I could plug my pc into... what more could a gamer ever need?

No way... You drive a black tempo correct?

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FYI... here's a website for a pretty popular Maga Kissa chain in tokyo and the services that they offer. They even have a nail salon!! haha. never seen that before :)

It's in japanese, but I'm sure you can figure it out.

ManBoo

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No way... You drive a black tempo correct?

blue, until it died. now a red dodge intrepid.

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Good question about a Manga in the US.

I have never been to one...nor did I research internationally when I was planning GrandLAN. I really looked more in the US at similar sized cities.

My understanding is that there are over 100,000 of gaming center/manga cafes throughout asia. Only about 1200 in the states.

I read up on the overseas cafes yesterday. I really wonder what the hook is...is it a place to get away from your cramped apartment for a few hours? Do some of the people not have internet at home? or, is it less expensive to share the media (you don't have to buy or rent the dvd, video game, comic, or book - you jst rent the space)?

One of the major differences here in the states is we (gaming centers) are very closely observed to make sure we are licensing each of our games on each of our computers. If I want Call to Duty 2 in my place I have to buy a copy for each of the PCs and the server...I am sure it would be similar if I wanted to have CDs or DVDs...the movie makers and music makers would want royalties for each time it was played.

I read online that the Manga Cafes are just begining to be targeted for copyright infractions. Could be interesting to see how that plays out.

In the US, I believe the hook to come to a place like GrandLAN is social. It is a great place to play the games with old friends or a place to make friends.

Thanks for inspiring me to look overseas for more information. Really interesting stuff.

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I read up on the overseas cafes yesterday. I really wonder what the hook is...is it a place to get away from your cramped apartment for a few hours? Do some of the people not have internet at home? or, is it less expensive to share the media (you don't have to buy or rent the dvd, video game, comic, or book - you jst rent the space)?

I'm not sure about Internet at home. I've read the South Korea has the highest level of broadband penentration in the world. But people still go to the PC bang all the time (there are also DVD bangs and more). From my understanding it is just to get out, to hang out with friends, etc. It's not as common to live alone there. People typically don't move leave home until marriage and apartments are small. You probably wouldn't invite all your friends over, you'd go out and do something.

My friend taught English in Seoul for about a year. He told me it was common for his students to visit their grandparents every weekend. The kids didn't know it, but their parents were really just getting the kids out of the house so they could be alone once in a while.

-nb

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...But people still go to the PC bang all the time (there are also DVD bangs and more)....

OK, what is a "bang" (in this context)?

[if you have to ask, you're too old]

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OK, what is a "bang" (in this context)?

[if you have to ask, you're too old]

It means "room" in Korean... see the following wiki about it specifically relating to this topic

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bang_%28Korean%29

Also, remember that it's not pronounced "bang" as in the sound a gun makes. or the sexual reference, but "baang" (like you're saying "aaaah").

One thing about those places though that REALLY got to me somethimes is that people didn't want to use headphones... EVER! So they're in there playing these video games full blast, which of course means that no one can hear anything that is happening in their own game. It does sound cool though... especially when everyone is playing the same war fighting game with swords clashing and stuff.

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