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GRDadof3

"Buy Local Michigan Produce" Campaign

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Bear with me, this really is interesting. A study conducted by CS Mott and MLUI has concluded that by investing as little as $9.5 Million, the State can alter the image of Michigan made produce and generate a whopping $164 Million income for Michigan farmers, and possibly generate almost 2000 jobs.

Michigan Land Use Institute article

In local fruits, vegetables, a new prosperity beckons

Some interesting finding I didn't realize regarding Michigan produce, even though we are only second behind California in fruit and vegetable production:

1 vegetables are sold at relatively low prices as ingredients for canned, frozen, dried, and other processed products.

2 Much of the $1.9 billion of higher-value fresh fruits and vegetables consumed in Michigan comes from other states and countries.

3 Michigan farms can meet a broad range of fresh produce market demands.

4 Michigan-grown fresh produce is gaining in competitive advantage through new consumer demand for locally grown food.

Selling produce as "fresh produce", as opposed to fillers for processed foods, earns farmers exponentially more money. It would also greatly decrease produce being imported from China and other countries, helping to transfer some of the large trade deficit with China.

Eat Fresh and Grow Jobs Campaign Recommendations

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Just don't buy spinach right now :shok:

I think it would be a great idea :) Although I buy most of my produce from Meijer (yeah I know) I so try and get as many people out to the farmer's markets as I can :)

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Just don't buy spinach right now :shok:

I think it would be a great idea :) Although I buy most of my produce from Meijer (yeah I know) I so try and get as many people out to the farmer's markets as I can :)

That's exactly part of the problem. The spinach that contains the E Coli is processed, bagged spinach not grown locally. I also read that studies done on bagged vegetables in grocery stores contain huge amounts of bacteria. There's nothing wrong about buying produce at Meijer per se. Just because it's bought at Meijer does not necessarily mean it's not grown in Michigan. It depends on the season.

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That's exactly part of the problem. The spinach that contains the E Coli is processed, bagged spinach not grown locally. I also read that studies done on bagged vegetables in grocery stores contain huge amounts of bacteria. There's nothing wrong about buying produce at Meijer per se. Just because it's bought at Meijer does not necessarily mean it's not grown in Michigan. It depends on the season.

True, and I really don't know many people who eat spinach (other then cartoon sailors) I actually kind of like the bagged stuff especially salad, because its so much easier to work with for a person like me, but after this spinach scare I think im going back to the ole' heads for a change.

But stuff like potatoes, and apples, and other fruits and veggies I look for "Michigan" on the bag. the Idaho potatoes in particular tend to be a little riper when they get here to MI, and sometimes don't look as good as the locally grown potatoes.

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True, and I really don't know many people who eat spinach (other then cartoon sailors) I actually kind of like the bagged stuff especially salad, because its so much easier to work with for a person like me, but after this spinach scare I think im going back to the ole' heads for a change.

But stuff like potatoes, and apples, and other fruits and veggies I look for "Michigan" on the bag. the Idaho potatoes in particular tend to be a little riper when they get here to MI, and sometimes don't look as good as the locally grown potatoes.

I've completely replaced lettuce (which is just roughage with no nutritional value) with cold spinach on everything, from burgers and tacos to salads. It actually adds a lot more flavor than plain lettuce. However, at our household, we were mainly doing this with bagged spinach. I think we may have to reassess that practice. :unsure:

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Good switch Dad.

I assume you are referring to "Iceburg" lettuce? The round ball of white lettuce with no nutritional value?

I know other lettuces such as Red Leaf, Green Leaf, Savoy, Romaine, Butter, Endive and Radiccio have very good nutritional value. Of course Spinach is one of the best too.

I worked at the Cascade Meijer produce for several years while at GRJC (That's GRCC if you are not 30 or older) :)

I've completely replaced lettuce (which is just roughage with no nutritional value) with cold spinach on everything, from burgers and tacos to salads. It actually adds a lot more flavor than plain lettuce. However, at our household, we were mainly doing this with bagged spinach. I think we may have to reassess that practice. :unsure:

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I know that I've seen recently that Meijer places a little blurb on their weekly ads about purchasing locally grown produce for that Meijer, be Indiana, Illinios, etc.

http://www.meijer.com/food/localgrowers.asp

They state they're the largest purchaser of Michigan apples in the country, Im not sure how they arise at that, Im surprised Wal-Mart wouldn't be, but then again, thats probably the purpose of the study.

It would be nice if people marketed it better as to what state the fresh produce is coming from no matter what store I shop at. I always try to by Michigan when possible/advertised.

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Good switch Dad.

I assume you are referring to "Iceburg" lettuce? The round ball of white lettuce with no nutritional value?

I know other lettuces such as Red Leaf, Green Leaf, Savoy, Romaine, Butter, Endive and Radiccio have very good nutritional value. Of course Spinach is one of the best too.

I worked at the Cascade Meijer produce for several years while at GRJC (That's GRCC if you are not 30 or older) :)

Oh yes, I meant iceburg lettuce. :blush:

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Bear with me, this really is interesting. A study conducted by CS Mott and MLUI has concluded that by investing as little as $9.5 Million, the State can alter the image of Michigan made produce and generate a whopping $164 Million income for Michigan farmers, and possibly generate almost 2000 jobs.

Michigan Land Use Institute article

In local fruits, vegetables, a new prosperity beckons

Some interesting finding I didn't realize regarding Michigan produce, even though we are only second behind California in fruit and vegetable production:

1 vegetables are sold at relatively low prices as ingredients for canned, frozen, dried, and other processed products.

2 Much of the $1.9 billion of higher-value fresh fruits and vegetables consumed in Michigan comes from other states and countries.

3 Michigan farms can meet a broad range of fresh produce market demands.

4 Michigan-grown fresh produce is gaining in competitive advantage through new consumer demand for locally grown food.

Selling produce as "fresh produce", as opposed to fillers for processed foods, earns farmers exponentially more money. It would also greatly decrease produce being imported from China and other countries, helping to transfer some of the large trade deficit with China.

Eat Fresh and Grow Jobs Campaign Recommendations

Patronize your local farmers markets planeteers! Your dollar goes the farthest and your produce is the freshest at your local farmers market!

GridGirl and I discuss the state of the City over piping hot coffee and crackin fresh produce every Saturday morning with the whole midtown crew at the Fulton Street Farmers Market.

Why don't we see more of you?

Vote with your dollars! Support your local farmers!

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I was very happy to see this study. It confirms something I have seen for a while. I am a management consultant and specialize in the agriculture/agribusiness industry. A great deal of my work is done in Michigan.

Many people don't know that Michigan Agriculture is the second most diverse in the nation, leading in the production of dry beans (black, cranberry, light red kidney, navy, small red), blueberries, tart cherries, cucumbers (for pickles), flowering hanging baskets, geraniums, impatiens, and petunias.

MICHIGAN AGRICULTURE FACTS: 1.05 million (direct and indirect) employed in the agri-food system - equal to 24% of all persons working in Michigan; 727,000 per-sons in direct employment. Michigan

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