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atlrvr

Green Line Question

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I've noticed recently that in the Boylsten Station, the Green Line looks like it originally split, with a spur going to the right of the station platform and then down, under the current operating line. On the inbound side, it looks like a spur comes in on the right side of the platform (which is where the historic trolley's are stored)

My assumption is, this was an original spur that never was completed....or maybe it was and closed down.

The obvious route looks like the tracks would have continued further down Tremont.

Does anyone know anything about this? How far do those tracks extend? Were any additional stations built?

Also, why is there no "A" branch, or was this it?

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Also, why is there no "A" branch, or was this it?

The A Line used to go to Watertown, it split off Comm. Ave. at Packards Corner and went down Brighton Ave. to Washington Street through Brighton Center, Oak Square, Newton, Corner, and then to Watertown Square. The 57 bus line is the replacement service for the A line Trolley.

I think the line that split at Boylston pre-dated the lettering system.

Many railfans would like to see the portal at Boylston reopened and have street car service replace the Silverline to Dudley Square.

The portal for those tracks is under this round building in Bay Village.

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Thanks guys.....it is shame this got closed, I assume because of the Mass Pike. Still, I would definitely prefer this spur to be reopened and the Silver Line shuttered, though I would think it might overload the capacity at Park and Gov. Center.

One more question. I seems that the underground stations are all capable of handling 3, and maybe 4 vehicle sets. Is there a logical reason that the surface stations don't add additiional canopies and run at least 3 vehicle sets during rush hours?

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One more question. I seems that the underground stations are all capable of handling 3, and maybe 4 vehicle sets. Is there a logical reason that the surface stations don't add additiional canopies and run at least 3 vehicle sets during rush hours?

You can see on Huntington near Northeastern where they recently expanded the E branch surface platforms, there are plans to follow suit on the B Branch on Comm. Ave. The surface stations, can and do serve three car trains, they run mostly during big events such as the Marathon or the Tall Ships, but I *think* they are adding 3 car trains to regular rush hour service all ready, but not living in the city anymore, I can't confirm that.

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Thanks again....I take the E line every day to take my son to school and I had noticed station work. I had never seen a 3 train set in Park St. so I don't think they are running them yet on any branch, but it's good to hear it's in the plans.....the E is hell in the mornings.

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The E used to be my line until I gave up and just started walking the extra block to Ruggles, much better.

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The Boston Subway, and in particular the Green Line, are very interesting because they are so old and have had so many changes. That section of the subway is the oldest in this country, and originally intended to allow streetcars (there were no subways back then) to travel underground along Tremont street. Orignially the line did not turn at Boylston and simply continued down till it emerged as indicated above. Only later was another section added which at first simply turned the corner and emerged beside Boston Public Gardens. If you watch the sides of the tunnel after it turns the corner you can see where these portals used to be.

The Green Line underwent many changes, from streetcars to the combination trolly/subway it is now. If you look up some of the explanations of what used to be it makes quite an interesting tour.

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You are talking about the old Tremont st. subway system, the original.

At Boylston, it goes under into a tunnel, which is now closed. This tunnel came up right on Tremont st and ran as a street car from there.

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Thanks again....I take the E line every day to take my son to school and I had noticed station work. I had never seen a 3 train set in Park St. so I don't think they are running them yet on any branch, but it's good to hear it's in the plans.....the E is hell in the mornings.

I used to live on South St. in JP and took the #39 bus -- I got there in '86, shortly after the trolley service to Arborway stopped running. In the winter, sometimes the bus was so slow that I could do better walking.

Are the NIMBYs (or whatever) still blocking the return of trolleys, or has the T abandoned the idea (after going to the trouble of re-doing the Arborway station a number of years back, in preparation for their return)?

Urb (Boston --> Chicago --> Flagstaff --> Providence)

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I used to live on South St. in JP and took the #39 bus -- I got there in '86, shortly after the trolley service to Arborway stopped running. In the winter, sometimes the bus was so slow that I could do better walking.

Are the NIMBYs (or whatever) still blocking the return of trolleys, or has the T abandoned the idea (after going to the trouble of re-doing the Arborway station a number of years back, in preparation for their return)?

Urb (Boston --> Chicago --> Flagstaff --> Providence)

I know others might offer more info on this. But I believe the restoration of the trolley service was on a list of potential projects but it didn't make it to the final list that the state endorsed.

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Are the NIMBYs (or whatever) still blocking the return of trolleys, or has the T abandoned the idea (after going to the trouble of re-doing the Arborway station a number of years back, in preparation for their return)?

Officially, the E line past Heath St is still closed "temporarily" HAH!

And I don't believe this is a NIMBY case, it's in fact exactly the opposite - the city is ignoring the needs of its citizens in the poorest areas of town (well, ok, that part of JP is pretty gentrified now).

Though i am actually a pretty big fan of the 39 bus, it serves my needs.

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After making a recent trip to Houston and seeing how they designed their metro through downtown, I became really turned on by the idea of restoring the Arborway section of the E line, though with some changes. Ideally, I would like to see on-street parking on roads the trolly runs on to be banned, and the street completly overhauled. Really, I would like to see something similar to what Houston has done:

hmta88.jpg

hmta90.jpg

hmta66.jpg

houston51.jpg

The pictures arn't ideal, but you can see how the city took a road similar in width to South Huntington Street and really made an efficient use of space to accomodate both autos and trollys.

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Has there ever been any discussion of building a below track pedestrian connection at Copley? It seems slightly absurd that at one of the more popular station, and at the junction of the E line, that there is no way to transfer between inbound and outbound. Something along the lines of what exists at Park St. would do.

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