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urbanophile

Rosy Article about pgh in The Economist

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There was a rosy article in "The Economist" (a world-wide news magazine based in the UK) about Pittsburgh. It said that the area was seeing a revival. Also the article stated that, while demographically Pgh has a less educated populace than most other metros in the US, the education level of people in the 25-34 age group was among the highest in the US. It said that 41% of people in Pgh in that age group had a college degree and, in terms of the percentage of people with graduate degrees, Pgh ranked 4th in the US after only San Francisco, Boston, and Washington. It then said that the demographics would change dramatically since many of the older (less educated) people would be dying off, leaving the younger, more educated, people to inherit the town. That's because, unlike most other metros in the US, Pittsburgh is deficient in the baby boomer category since many of them moved out during the economic bust of the 70's and 80's. So while other metros are going to suffer from a more geriatric population in the next few decades, Pgh will make a generational jump to a younger generation (which, I guess, can be seen by how Pgh jumped to a 26-year old mayor).

Here's the beginning of the article. It is viewable from the internet by subscription only but it's on newstands this week at least until Sunday (September 17).

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The state of Pittsburgh

Sep 14th 2006

From The Economist print edition

A FEW years ago, the Pittsburgh region was so desperate to hang on to its brightest young people that its boosters thought about running television ads featuring Border Guard Bob, a patrolman who would have stopped youngsters on their way out of town and urged them to stay. Wisely, the boosters scrapped that idea. And increasingly it seems as though the worries were misplaced anyway.

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i've been dying to read this article but can't find the current issue of the Economist anywhere here in Wooster, Ohio ... bah

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Sounds like a good article that looks at both sides of the statistics. Imagine that, responsible journalism does exist :)

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The only thing that got me through my horrible US Airways experience yesterday and today was the possibility of being the first one to post this. I hope you are all happy!

At any rate, it was a great article. I bought the economist in the CLT airport to pass time today thanks to being stuck in Tallahassee, FL last night (to see my Tigers beat up on Florida State!). I had no idea the article was in there and BAM, turned the page and there it was. small bright spot of a dreary day for this guys lol.

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For anyone still looking for the print version, I found copies of it at the Barnes and Noble in South Hills last night and I bet Joseph-Beth will have it because they seem keep magazines for a long time. I haven't had time to read it yet but I can't wait. Then I'll give my economics-degree-based review of it :D (hey who else ever took an economics degree just for the fun of reading The Economist?)

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It then said that the demographics would change dramatically since many of the older (less educated) people would be dying off, leaving the younger, more educated, people to inherit the town. That's because, unlike most other metros in the US, Pittsburgh is deficient in the baby boomer category since many of them moved out during the economic bust of the 70's and 80's. So while other metros are going to suffer from a more geriatric population in the next few decades

Good point....

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What I get out of it...

Some of those boom towns that are priding themselves on being able to attract so many people right now are going to find it to be a handicap in the future. It sounds great for Pittsburgh but it's also pretty scary overall. All that waste and the perpetuation of a cyclical economy. It's got to be in everyone's best interests to not let these other cities adopt boom economies. For example if you're in a state getting subsidized by federal tax money that's being taken out of Pennsylvanian incomes, then you really aren't entitled to pay lower taxe rates than Pennsylvanians. More money should be spent on maintaining what's already there and disinsentives should be put in to discourage wasting more of our natural resources on boom towns and sprawl. I think this article is even more evidence to do what new urbanists have been talking about all along.

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The PG's "Morning File" had a pretty funny comparison between the Economist and the New York Times articles...I'm lazy though, so I'm not going to go find the link!

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I haven't had time to read the Economist article but that comparison is very striking. I think it says a lot about perceptions of the city, and the importance of not dwelling too much on the past.

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from 1995 to 2005, 8 old folk-neighbors of mine - on a block of only 10 houses - have died. Now all younger people live in those houses.

"to every season..."

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from 1995 to 2005, 8 old folk-neighbors of mine - on a block of only 10 houses - have died. Now all younger people live in those houses.

Be nice to the old folks... they might give you a bargain on their old house :silly:

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speaking of that, here is a funny story...

My parents just bought a house in Lawrenceville. It was previously owned by a very old lady who kept it in great shape. She had a bunch of kids, but they would never come see her. They had all moved out west and refused to make the trip back home. Everyyear, the old lady would buy presents for her grandkids, but never got to see them because her children never brought them out here.

So last year this lonely old lady passed away leaving her awesome house in great shape...to the mail man. He had more contact with her for the past couple years than her kids...good for her. And it was way nice for the mail man. Before taxes that was a cool $100,000

So yes, be nice to old people, you never know how much they might appreciate you!

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So, I'm guessing that she probably mailed a lot of gifts and the mail carrier felt sorry for her. That almost has a Twilight Zone twist to it. It's good, though. I just moved to an apartment in Lawrenceville, I'm always looking at the houses for sale in the neighborhood since I just got a new job as a software engineer, so I see myself in the market for one soon.

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well good, i'll have my sales license soon. so when you start looking hit me up and I'll be your agent haha

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