Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Aporkalypse

Wal-Mart

Recommended Posts

True Wal-mart can't grow foever, but I don't think people thought it was going to slow down quite this quickly. But I still think that once a company seems to hit a certain size and level of continued success that it just starts making people want to start tearing it down. Maybe there's some of that involved along with the fact of them trying to move into urban areas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


99.9% of people's negative perception of Wal-Mart stores is because it's ingrained into everyone's mind that Target's are nicer than Wal-Mart. It doesn't really matter how nice a store is so long as it has the word WAL*MART in front and people automatically see it as cheap. That is changing rapidly, but it will take time for people to adjust to reality and get past the fact that within just a few years Wal-Mart stores will not only be nicer and cleaner than Targets but the products will also be of equal or higher calibre than Target's at a lower price.

I know it's hard to believe, but that's only because your mind has been so altered by misconceptions and blatant lies about Wal-Mart that short of therapy it'll just take time for you to accept the facts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think in many markets across the country this is the sentiment. I have only been to Walmart maybe 6 times in my entire life. They just feel different than Target...pronounced Tar' jay...lol. Years ago and the first 2 of the times I went to Walmart, they did appear clutered and the people seemed to be like bag people looking for food to eat in dumpsters. These Walmarts were also located in further suburbs than were I grew up. I was totally turned off by the appearance and the clothes were atrocious. I vowed never to step foot or be caught dead in a Walmart. Then years later a Walmart opened in the suburb of Atlanta were I was living as a child...Dunwoody...surely if Walmart can land in Dunwoody then things must have changed. Well yeah, some things had changed and some things seemed to have stayed the same. The clothes were still atrocious.

To me....please understand this is my personal feeling...Walmart just feels like it's on a lower level than Target. I'm sorry to say. I don't even think it's because it's from Arkansas either. As a young girl, when Walmarts entered into the Atlanta market, I could have cared less where it came from. My world was Dunwoody and Sandy Springs....going up to Alpharetta was like a trip. Like anyone else, I value my money. I'm a stay at home mother with five children and my husband works hard to provide a certain lifestyle for us. I have friends who can't understand my rationale...why I have no problem shopping at Target yet I will not step foot in a Walmart. For heaven's sake, I'm a member of Costco and BJ's but not of Sams Club. It makes no sense.

In defense of the cleanliness and organized nature of Walmart, I will say that I have gone to one that was really nice. There was a new one that opened about the time that the Mall of Georgia opened on GA 20 at I-985. It's a Super Walmart and it really does live up to it's super title. I got some of the best peaches I had ever had from that store. I guess it's stores like this where some people seem to make trips to Walmart like family outting. The parking lot is huge. If it's full, you better not wear heels.

Even with this store as a model, I still do not shop at Walmart. Mine is not a protest for wages or benefits for the workers (it would make more sense if that was my reason) but rather the image that Walmart has in my mind is very hard to shake. It just feels...ummm.....cheap. Like I said earlier, I do not think it's a snob thing because I have no problem in shopping Target for school supplies, hose pipes, paper towels or incidentals like that. I even will get my children underwear from there.

It's not because Walmart is from Arkansas. It can't be. I can only speak for myself, but I know others may feel the same way, who cares that it's from Arkansas. I felt the same way as a child about KMart when they were once big. If my mother even thought about going to KMart, I would rather stay home with my daddy. While I was a "daddy's little princess," my mother and I are really close and I enjoyed every minute shopping with her. For me to turn down such an outting was a clear indication of my disdain for KMart as well.

I have done personal accessments of the items at Target and Walmart. On one of the visits to Target, I wanted to end my unfair snub of Walmart. I bought a set of bedding, 600 thread count, seafoam green for my eldest daughter's bed. I went to Walmart to see if I could find something comparable to my purchase at Target. I even went to one of the nicer Walmarts in Boca Raton. On comparison, the sheets at Walmart seemed to be of a lesser quality. The colors weren't as vibrant even though they were the same thread count. To top it off, Walmart was only about $3 cheaper. The $3 was not worth it. I walked out the store and I have not been back since.

One thing that is good about Walmart....there are some here in the Atlanta metro area that are opened 24 hours. I don't think there is a Target that is opened later than 10pm. I can't imagine what a person would need from Walmart at 2:30am but it's good to know that they are opened late for those insomniacs that need a late night shopping fix.

I'm probably not going to be liked much around here any more but I must speak as I find. I'm sure that in time my feelings may change....until then it's off to Tar' jay for my shopping needs.

Interesting perspective. I'm a constant Wal-Mart shopper. However, I grew up in a small town (Fayetteville).

Have some of you all been to those old K-Marts? Now those were really dumpy. I've never been to a Supercenter that was dumpy-- those old Wal-Marts were (and still are in little towns).

I wager the reason many people don't like Wal-Marts is because of the type of people that shop there (though they wouldn't say it), and don't want to be near them (i.e. lower-income people). Not to say you do, but others. I myself couldn't care less, and growing up in Arkansas, even in the middle to upper class there wasn't a stigma against shopping at Wal-Mart.

Who goes to Wal-Mart to buy clothes? I would never do that. Like how I wouldn't go there to buy hardware products, shoes, or a tv. But I care more about convenience and decent prices for everyday itmes. Eggs are eggs, deoderant is deoderant, and a birthday card is a birthday card.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have some of you all been to those old K-Marts? Now those were really dumpy. I've never been to a Supercenter that was dumpy-- those old Wal-Marts were (and still are in little towns).

I have not stepped foot in a KMart since the introduction of the Martha Stewart line. I love her so I thought I would check it out. I walked in and was turned off...even Martha could not induce me to come back. KMarts were dumps then...well most of them. The ones that remain have been remolded from what I can tell from the outside but I'm not going inside one to find out. Plus there are just so few remaining.

I wager the reason many people don't like Wal-Marts is because of the type of people that shop there (though they wouldn't say it), and don't want to be near them (i.e. lower-income people). Not to say you do, but others. I myself couldn't care less, and growing up in Arkansas, even in the middle to upper class there wasn't a stigma against shopping at Wal-Mart.
That's interesting that you would point that out. I can't say that I disagree that some people may feel that way. I also cannot disagree that deep down part of my distaste for WalMart could be its plebeian association. At least in the beginning that's how it was introduced. I must tell you though that in the Atlanta market Target overall outshines Walmart...even if it's prices are slightly higher.

If I remember correctly, Target entered the Atlanta market just after Walmart did. Target filled in the spaces vacated but this California store that I forget the name but it begin with a Z...I was so young then. I do remember that it was before the explosive growth of the late 80's and 90's. What Target did was not compete directly with Walmart and KMart....who had already made a name for itself in the Atlanta market...they became a different store.

It was like Target was a discount store ashamed of being a discount store. The stores they opened here were very nice. The aisle were extra wide. The store was really bright and it's like they carried things that one could find at JCPenny or Sears...but for a slightly lesser price. That immediately set Target at a slight step above Walmart and KMart. Target has never looked back. For a while Target focused on the inner suburban rings of Atlanta. It also made sure to lock in some of Atlanta's wealthiest suburbs. I can remember when Walmart opened in Roswell and Alpharetta...and I was married by then. Walmart appeared to be focused on the less affluent suburbs and exurban and rural communites. This is what gave Walmart it's image in the Atlanta metro. It became a store known as "where country and poor people shop."

Be it right or wrong, that's how it is. It's sounds horrible even as I type it but perhaps I'm trying to cure myself so this is therapy for me. I'm trying to get over this negative image of low quailty that Walmart has in my mind. Bear with me people....please.

Who goes to Wal-Mart to buy clothes? I would never do that. Like how I wouldn't go there to buy hardware products, shoes, or a tv. But I care more about convenience and decent prices for everyday itmes. Eggs are eggs, deoderant is deoderant, and a birthday card is a birthday card.

There in lies the problem in some of the major markets. I will have to appeal to Aporkalypse for verification of the Dallas market but when you live in a major market where there are just sooooooooooo many choices. Convenience is no longer an issue. It boils down to quality. In Atlanta, and I'm sure it's like this in Dallas as well, you can have four major power centers all next to each other. One will have the Home Depot, the SuperTarget, Best Buy and Whole Foods and right across the street is Lowes, Super WalMart, Circuit City and Kroger. Next to the Target shopping center you may have Ace Hardware, Marshalls, Office Depot and Publixs and across from that you may have TJMaxx, DSW Shoes, Barnes & Noble, Office Max and Etzi's (another grocery store). I have yet to mention that further down the street in the other power centers the Costco and BJ or Sams. Then there are the countless super lifestyle centers. In crowded retail markets like a Dallas, Houston or Atlanta, Walmart loses it's convenience edge and it falls to quality.

When competition pushes prices so low in major markets already, you can be much more selective. When I go to smaller markets in the southeast, I am surprised at the high prices they pay in relative terms to what we pay in Atlanta....and our average incomes are much higher. Perhaps that's why people in major markets begin to separate Walmart from others based on preception because other than that, it's merely a big store that have low prices....now they have blended in to the rest of the market. The only place they may be better priced is in the clothing department.

As far as the comment that Walmarts will one day be nicer and cleaner than Targets, I hope so. Target is doing a heck of a great job in infiltrating the Atlanta urban market. They are now working on a store in the Atlantic Station development in Midtown Atlanta and it is a very urban style store. Win win for Atlanta's growing true urban movement and Target. About a mile away, Walmart is opening a huge store as well....in a very suburban fashion right in an urban neighborhood. Win for Walmart...loss for the growing urban movement in Atlanta. That has definitely left a bad taste in some intown residents mouth. Atlanta is now trying to fight the sprawl happy developments of the last 25 years...it seems that Walmart has not gotten on board.

There are now areas in the Atlanta metro that are fighting any Walmarts from coming in. One is against Walmart because they feel the store would destroy the neighborhood and another because they feel that Walmart is not suited for the economic demographics of the area. Last I heard, both cases are still being fought by Walmart but it just shows the growing tide against Walmart.

In Walmart's defense, I'm sure it's a rather nice store. I'm sure that overall you can save by shopping there. I don't see how when you can get the same low prices from Costco without having to put a bag over your face while shopping. I'm sure that most people are being unfair to it. I think that Walmart should stay it's course. Don't alter it's imagine because of a few people like me will never shop there. Stay true to the millions who shop Walmart every week. Okay, so you won't grow as fast as you once did. Nothing can sustain the blistering growth that Walmart has had for the last 30 years. Short of my husband gambling every dime away and then dying, me never remarrying and my parents disowning me, I will not make Walmart a regular shopping experience. As long as the people happy with Walmart are kept happy then that's all that should matter.

So what if Boston does not want you. Life goes on. There are different stores for different people. I think Walmart is well aware of it's target....hehehehehehe...market and that is who they should focus on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hehe, that was quite the rant. There seems to be some sort of community backlash against new Wal-Marts across the nation.

My parents live near a plot of land that Wal-Mart wants to build upon, and residents of the neighboring subdivisions have spent several hundred thousand in legal fees to keep the Wal-Mart (and supposedly other big-boxes) out. They have succeeded thus far, but I'm not sure what the final verdict will be. The area is pretty affluent I guess, with the median household income north of $150k, and the main arguments the residents give is that the Wal-Mart will bring down land values and bring a rise in crime.

Honestly, I don't see how too much riffraff are going to find there way down there. It's a hell of a drive from any of the poor parts of town, it's hard to get to, and it's 7 miles away from the freeway. There is a Target two miles to the North that does very well, and the clientile seem to be upper-middle-class.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Who goes to Wal-Mart to buy clothes? I would never do that. Like how I wouldn't go there to buy hardware products, shoes, or a tv. But I care more about convenience and decent prices for everyday itmes. Eggs are eggs, deoderant is deoderant, and a birthday card is a birthday card.

Well I do. I don't see anything wrong with the clothes that you get at Walmart. They are made in the same 3rd world textile mills as all of the designer clothes. And I wouldn't have any problem purchasing hardware, a TV, or shoes there if they were selling what I wanted. When all of our manufacturing has moved overseas, I really don't see what difference it makes in what distributer you buy it from.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perhaps I should also point out that I hardly ever shop at Wal-mart. It's not because I hate them or anything. In many ways it's not convenient for me. I don't tend to stock up on groceries and they tend to be rather busy and a bit inconvenient for me to buy the way I do now.

I'm very anti-Walmart for several reasons and this one is near the top of my list. I remember when Walmart opened it's first store in Little Rock during the seventies, because it was only a block or so from my house. It wasn't nearly as big or busy as Walmart stores are today and I loved it. That Walmart was more like a neighborhood dollar store and was probaby smaller then the Kmart that's still there on Rodney Parham.

In contrast, Walmart stores today are designed to draw huge crowds from far away, which can only be accomplished by annihilating the competition. It's a hassle just to park, similar to going to a mall, but I won't spend five minutes finding a parking space to buy toiletries and cleaning supplies. And the prices are nothing to get excited about either, except for the few good deals intended as faux examples of Walmart pricing.

The dumpy image and poor quality of Walmart merchandise are not the bigger problems, imo. I also disagree that it has anything to do with Walmart's headquarters being in Arkansas. The problem as I see it is that a) people who care about their communities are not going to be hospitable to big-box retailers due to the problems they cause to the communities and b) as the largest and worst example of these big-box retailers, common sense dictates that Walmart is going to receive the brunt of the criticism, as it should, imo.

This is my short answer, but I could cite a long list of problems with Walmart that haven't been mentioned here yet and I won't because I don't think it would be appropriate in this small space. But basically, I don't think that Walmart adds anything to most communities and I'm no snob or I wouldn't spend so much time shopping at Goodwill (We've really got to get this chip off our shoulder in Arkansas, btw. Snobs aren't the only people who have criticisms, but that seems to be our first response too much of the time.)

P.S. I live near the Walmart on the corner of Chenal Parkway and Cantrell, and while it does have a nicer facade then the older stores, it's still no better on the inside. I'm not a fan of Target either, but I do like it better then Walmart. The only thing I like about Walmart is that it's open 24/7, which is nice if you work long hours and can only shop during early morning/late evening hours, which I've been forced to do at times.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting perspective. I'm a constant Wal-Mart shopper. However, I grew up in a small town (Fayetteville).

Have some of you all been to those old K-Marts? Now those were really dumpy. I've never been to a Supercenter that was dumpy-- those old Wal-Marts were (and still are in little towns).

K-Mart stores are dumpy because they're old and because the renovations were mostly publicity stunts. Wal-Mart does a better job at repairing and redecorating their stores, but the reason they're seen as dumps is because they're intentionally designed to appeal to people who feel comfortable in dumps (this is obviously changing, atleast a little, but I'm talking about in the past.) You can call me a snob for being honest, but I'm not saying that I'm too good to shop at Wal-Mart; just saying that Wal-Mart purposely designs it's stores to be very plain, which many people consider to be an eyesore or a dump.

I'll also add that I've been to a few Supercenters that I consider to be dumps, including the old one in Dallas, which is one of the worst Wal-Mart stores that I've ever seen.

I wager the reason many people don't like Wal-Marts is because of the type of people that shop there (though they wouldn't say it), and don't want to be near them (i.e. lower-income people). Not to say you do, but others. I myself couldn't care less, and growing up in Arkansas, even in the middle to upper class there wasn't a stigma against shopping at Wal-Mart.
I won't disagree with you, but a) there are people who feel the same way about Target, although I'll admit they're fewer in numbers, b) if this is a big enough problem for Wal-Mart, and I'm not saying that it is, then it should build stores where people appreciate them more and stay out of areas where they don't and c) I don't really think this is that big of a problem, except when Wal-Mart builds stores in locations where people have no desire to shop at Wal-Mart and don't want to deal with the traffic from people commuting from other parts of the city to shop at Wal-Mart, as well as the depreciation in land values in their communnity.

Who goes to Wal-Mart to buy clothes? I would never do that. Like how I wouldn't go there to buy hardware products, shoes, or a tv. But I care more about convenience and decent prices for everyday itmes. Eggs are eggs, deoderant is deoderant, and a birthday card is a birthday card.

Obviously, people do buy clothes and the other goods you wouldn't buy -- if they didn't, then Wal-Mart could build significantly smaller stores, which would alleviate a lot of criticism. This flows into your next comment about convenience and prices; Wal-Mart isn't convenient in most places and the prices on everyday items aren't anything to speak of (in fact, you could argue that Wal-Mart drives up prices by driving away competition.) Because Wal-Mart's so inconvenient, I've wondered if I'd like it better if it split each store into multiple stores with one for each department and with each store at a different location. It obviously wouldn't be Wal-Mart -- the way we know it, anyway -- if this happened, but it would be more convenenient. I'd still have problems with Wal-Mart, however.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is such an awesome thread and it's wonderful to see how much input there is from both Wal-Mart supporters and "those with an opposing view of Wal-Mart." I thought I'd just post a

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, this topic suddenly got rather active. It is interesting to see both sides. Of course I think the fact that this is in the Arkansas forum does allow more of the positive side to show where it probably wouldn't elsewhere. I still overall consider myself more in the middle. I won't say Wal-mart does not wrong in the way it sometimes does business but as I said before I do get really tired of many people acting like it's the cause of all our problems and such. I believe all the big box retailers are pretty much doing the same thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I do. I don't see anything wrong with the clothes that you get at Walmart. They are made in the same 3rd world textile mills as all of the designer clothes. And I wouldn't have any problem purchasing hardware, a TV, or shoes there if they were selling what I wanted. When all of our manufacturing has moved overseas, I really don't see what difference it makes in what distributer you buy it from.

Well, I keep hearing about how Wal-Mart has changed their line-ups for clothing, but I haven't paid attention. Perhaps I myself have an antiquated misconception regarding some of Wal-Mart merchendise. I just remember being younger back when all clothes were super-cheap (price and quality). I guess I have bought things like white socks and underwear there...

And I don't have any problem purchasing items with which I don't have much concern over quality. It's just for some items where I know what I'm looking for, I won't even bother with Wal-Mart. The exception is a tv-- I recently purchased an hdtv (eventually from Circuit City), but I even checked out some Wal-Marts to see what they had just because I heard they were getting into that market. But their hdtv's, for the most part, are not the type of brands that I'd want to risk, based on my internet research on quality, features, and reliability.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In contrast, Walmart stores today are designed to draw huge crowds from far away, which can only be accomplished by annihilating the competition. It's a hassle just to park, similar to going to a mall, but I won't spend five minutes finding a parking space to buy toiletries and cleaning supplies. And the prices are nothing to get excited about either, except for the few good deals intended as faux examples of Walmart pricing.

It's a hassle just to park if you go there during peak times, just like any successful and popular department store. It's not bad stopping by right after work.

P.S. I live near the Walmart on the corner of Chenal Parkway and Cantrell, and while it does have a nicer facade then the older stores, it's still no better on the inside. I'm not a fan of Target either, but I do like it better then Walmart. The only thing I like about Walmart is that it's open 24/7, which is nice if you work long hours and can only shop during early morning/late evening hours, which I've been forced to do at times.

I used to too, until just recently I moved to near the Heights. That Wal-Mart was very convenient. Now I'm trying to get in the habit of going to Kroger instead (BTW, I'm a bit surprised there's no Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market in LR-- they're all over NWA).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

K-Mart stores are dumpy because they're old and because the renovations were mostly publicity stunts. Wal-Mart does a better job at repairing and redecorating their stores, but the reason they're seen as dumps is because they're intentionally designed to appeal to people who feel comfortable in dumps (this is obviously changing, atleast a little, but I'm talking about in the past.) You can call me a snob for being honest, but I'm not saying that I'm too good to shop at Wal-Mart; just saying that Wal-Mart purposely designs it's stores to be very plain, which many people consider to be an eyesore or a dump.

I'll also add that I've been to a few Supercenters that I consider to be dumps, including the old one in Dallas, which is one of the worst Wal-Mart stores that I've ever seen.

Not the one's I've been to. They were a dump because they didn't update their merchendise, they didn't pick up trash off the floors, and they didn't restock or front items.

What do you want a department store to look like? Cathedrial celeings with chandeliers and fountains where they march ducks for the crowds' enjoyment twice a day? It's a department store.

I won't disagree with you, but a) there are people who feel the same way about Target, although I'll admit they're fewer in numbers, b) if this is a big enough problem for Wal-Mart, and I'm not saying that it is, then it should build stores where people appreciate them more and stay out of areas where they don't and c) I don't really think this is that big of a problem, except when Wal-Mart builds stores in locations where people have no desire to shop at Wal-Mart and don't want to deal with the traffic from people commuting from other parts of the city to shop at Wal-Mart, as well as the depreciation in land values in their communnity.

Obviously, people do buy clothes and the other goods you wouldn't buy -- if they didn't, then Wal-Mart could build significantly smaller stores, which would alleviate a lot of criticism. This flows into your next comment about convenience and prices; Wal-Mart isn't convenient in most places and the prices on everyday items aren't anything to speak of (in fact, you could argue that Wal-Mart drives up prices by driving away competition.) Because Wal-Mart's so inconvenient, I've wondered if I'd like it better if it split each store into multiple stores with one for each department and with each store at a different location. It obviously wouldn't be Wal-Mart -- the way we know it, anyway -- if this happened, but it would be more convenenient. I'd still have problems with Wal-Mart, however.

They are convenient in most places-- they select their sites partly based on that criteria. They don't build them on dead-end dirt roads. Try stronger arguments.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CONS

None; unless you actually believe all the garbage and anti-Wal-Mart propaganda being spread by the misinformed few.

Hilarious.

You can easily find cons with Wal-Mart just as you can with Target. Probably moreso with Wal-Mart just by virtue of its size. To say there is none is either dishonest or naive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hilarious.

You can easily find cons with Wal-Mart just as you can with Target. Probably moreso with Wal-Mart just by virtue of its size. To say there is none is either dishonest or naive.

As a store Wal-Mart is no different from any other store. You either find what you're looking for or you don't, just like every other store on the planet. As a company I haven't found any cons that would single out Wal-Mart as the "bad guy". So I'm neither dishonest or naive. It seems the naivety falls on those who say Wal-Mart is a bad company because they're doing what everyone else is doing. The only difference is that Wal-Mart is doing so much more "good" than most other companies. Well if anyone can open their eyes for just a moment and read the list of "good" things that Wal-Mart is doing as a company you'd have to agree that for a company that operates discount stores they are going out of their way to make this world just a little bit better. Why would they do that when most large companies don't?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I keep hearing about how Wal-Mart has changed their line-ups for clothing, but I haven't paid attention. Perhaps I myself have an antiquated misconception regarding some of Wal-Mart merchendise. I just remember being younger back when all clothes were super-cheap (price and quality). I guess I have bought things like white socks and underwear there...

And I don't have any problem purchasing items with which I don't have much concern over quality. It's just for some items where I know what I'm looking for, I won't even bother with Wal-Mart. The exception is a tv-- I recently purchased an hdtv (eventually from Circuit City), but I even checked out some Wal-Marts to see what they had just because I heard they were getting into that market. But their hdtv's, for the most part, are not the type of brands that I'd want to risk, based on my internet research on quality, features, and reliability.

All Wal-Mart stores merchandise their stores based on the communities they're present in. If you stop at a Wal-Mart and don't like the "line-up" of clothing you may want to look around that community and you may then understand where Wal-Mart's "line-up" comes from. In a way shopping at Wal-Mart is a way of learning more about the community that Wal-Mart is in. Wal-Mart takes the time to make their stores fit into the community with the merchandising strategy and store design. Wal-Mart has earned the title

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^ Right and by that same train of thought.....Those $599 HP Computers on sale in the electronics department should last you a long time instead of buying a quality, built like you want it, Dell for twice as much. Well, the HP I bought ONE YEAR AGO crapped out in 6 months. Yep, 6 months. Needless to say, Wal Mart buys cheap so they can sell cheap and they will glad hand and bully whoever it takes to get it their way. Or else. That is bad business culture anyway you look at it. I would highly, HIGHLY recommend people not shop at a Wal Mart electronics department just based on the lack of knowledge the associates have and the inability to keep stuff in stock. Let alone the crappy quality of half the stuff found in there. The only thing, and it's the only thing, that Wal Mart knows how to do is push government officals into allowing them to continue with the bull and the crap they keep feeding middle and lower class america. Because otherwise, they would've been shut down ten years ago. Hey, I don't hate wal mart...I just dispise their business model and what they have made the company to be in the last 15 years. Which is nothing like Sam wanted it to be at all. He was all about being in the community he was in, unlike the corrupted garbage that runs the company now.

This coming from someone with over 5 years retail management experience of course. Two of them WITH Wal Mart!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a store Wal-Mart is no different from any other store. You either find what you're looking for or you don't, just like every other store on the planet. As a company I haven't found any cons that would single out Wal-Mart as the "bad guy". So I'm neither dishonest or naive. It seems the naivety falls on those who say Wal-Mart is a bad company because they're doing what everyone else is doing. The only difference is that Wal-Mart is doing so much more "good" than most other companies. Well if anyone can open their eyes for just a moment and read the list of "good" things that Wal-Mart is doing as a company you'd have to agree that for a company that operates discount stores they are going out of their way to make this world just a little bit better. Why would they do that when most large companies don't?

Did you read my post? I said you could find cons with Wal-Mart just as you could with Target.

You took the liberty not to note any cons, because "there are none." Funny. What a simplistic assertion.

Wal-Mart is doing good mainly because it is in their business interest. They can't take all the attacks without fighting back and doing good. There may be a few execs on the WalMart board who want to do good just for the hell of it, but if Kmart and Walmart were in reverse roles (profit-wise), it's pretty obvious they would not be doing the same thing.

It's simple economics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I stated above is certainly a con in my book. Another would be the promotion of sprawl and the monoploy of real estate that Wal Mart exerts on smaller cities. I can go on if you would like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
All Wal-Mart stores merchandise their stores based on the communities they're present in. If you stop at a Wal-Mart and don't like the "line-up" of clothing you may want to look around that community and you may then understand where Wal-Mart's "line-up" comes from. In a way shopping at Wal-Mart is a way of learning more about the community that Wal-Mart is in. Wal-Mart takes the time to make their stores fit into the community with the merchandising strategy and store design. Wal-Mart has earned the title

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wal-Mart's TV selection has gotten good over the past few years. They now have LCD's, HD Compatable, DLP, and Plasma TV's in plenty of stores. It wasn't too long ago that the best TV you could buy at Wal-Mart was a huge boxy 40+ inch TV. Thumbs up to improvements in the TV department. :thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

....Regarding the tv-- I think you missed my point. I actually bought a Sony, which Wal-Mart didn't have. If you want to buy an RCA rear-projection HDTV at Wal-Mart, by all means go ahead. But there's a reason they're very, very cheap. They had other brands/models that didn't rate too hot, I forget which ones. If Wal-Mart had any of the brands/models I was scoping out, and had it at a better price, I would've bought it there. But they didn't....

I've owned a number of different TVs over the decades and the only one that I actually had trouble with was the Sony. IMO, they are not worth the premium you pay for just the name. I recommend buying strictly on price as otherwise there isn't any difference in the components used in TVs anymore and the best buys are the ones with the off names. Many times they are made in exactly the same factories as the name brands.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've owned a number of different TVs over the decades and the only one that I actually had trouble with was the Sony. IMO, they are not worth the premium you pay for just the name. I recommend buying strictly on price as otherwise there isn't any difference in the components used in TVs anymore and the best buys are the ones with the off names. Many times they are made in exactly the same factories as the name brands.

I so agree with this!! The only reason Sony is more expensive than other T.V.'s is because of the word "Sony" in the product.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.