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New Downtown Courthouse Park


Lexy

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Got downtown this morning to shoot a few pics and stumbled across this delightful little slice of heaven down there. And to my surprise I was allowed exclusive access to the Observation Platforms for a shooting bonanza. Oh, I threw in a few new pics I got this morning as well. They are of downtown, but not from the park. Just thought you all would enjoy them the same.

Enjoy.

Michael

67757159.uCCcUNGE.acourthousefountains1.jpg

67756353.Y0gCEe9n.anashvillepark1.jpg

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67756950.VHYOoMZz.anashvillechurch1.jpg

67756826.wSmoQSPI.anashvillepark2.jpg

67756880.k6YhELjX.acourthouse.jpg

SCROLL>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

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SCROLL SOME MORE>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

67754181.KEAQYGDp.anashvillepan1a.jpg

It's not much in the way of pictures, but it is something to look at if you can't make it down there tomorrow for the big kick off.

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Ahhh, Lexy. Thanks man. These are pretty sweet. I've been driving by just waiting for the fense to finally down. And in a few hours, I imagine it will.

From the tower perspective I was thinking about how the view will be different as AmSouth begins the contemporary addition on the plaza. The change will be dramatic. Even though that part of the AmSouth is very 70s, I remember the construction and pictures like this will help us all. It will be a huge change in activating that street corner just across from the Square.

Good job, Lex.

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I said it over on SSP, but that pano is literally the best i've ever seen of the city. It is absolutely remarkable how you can see almost EVERY prominent building in the central city. If you look closely you can even see the Customs House, the Rymann, and The Parthenon peaking out from behind some of the bigger structures. Brilliant.

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I hate to be a bummer, but I sincerely hope that the city provides some sort of security around the park after dark. I was at the convention center on Saturday evening and about 7:30 PM I walked up Deadrick Street from the War Memorial toward the park and not only did I get harrassed by the usual homeless people in the bus shelters asking for money, but I actually got approached by several young punks who accused me of being a police officer! The homeless people didn't bother me, but the drug dealers did make me leery about the idea of visiting that park after dark if it is going to get overrun by those types. It really is such a nice park that it should be kept safe in order to be enjoyed.

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I hate to be a bummer, but I sincerely hope that the city provides some sort of security around the park after dark. I was at the convention center on Saturday evening and about 7:30 PM I walked up Deadrick Street from the War Memorial toward the park and not only did I get harrassed by the usual homeless people in the bus shelters asking for money, but I actually got approached by several young punks who accused me of being a police officer! The homeless people didn't bother me, but the drug dealers did make me leery about the idea of visiting that park after dark if it is going to get overrun by those types. It really is such a nice park that it should be kept safe in order to be enjoyed.

As more and more regular people begin to populate inner city Nashville, those types will slowly but surely be pushed either into the background out of sight, or out altogether. No need to worry.

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I understand security is to be around the clock. I would prefer some city presence in the Sqaure all the time. I'm sure video survelleince will be part of the picture as it is at the symphony center. Walking down Dederick in the bus shelters is something I don't do... I don't even like driving by. When the new transit center opens that area will once again be nice. Right now, people have nothing to do but hang while waiting for the buses. I'd suggest a different route, b. We want you safe.

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Why are people afraid of people in the bus shelters?? I walk down Deaderick at least a couple times a week. The area isn't specifically known for crime. Your fears are unfounded, and you are promoting an already-negative image of MTA and it riders. You guys need some diversity training! Homeless people don't always hang out on this street, and I honestly don't think it's fair to equate 'young punks' with 'drug dealers.' I dislike that 'us' vs. 'them' mentality. They are Nashvillians just like you, and they might just appreciate their life as much as you appreciate yours. If someone talks to you and makes you uncomfortable, that's as much your problem than theirs. You decide how you react. There are much, much worse parts of Nashville. I just ask that you don't generalize people into categories like that. It's ignorant. All Nashvillians have the right to use public areas as long as they aren't breaking laws. Who wouldn't want to hang out at the public square? It's a pleasant place for *everyone* to enjoy.

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I think most were being rather specific in an unspecific way about who and what possible situations we like to avoid. I don't think anyone is promoting exclusivity to one group over another. There are, whether we like it or not, thieves and thugs among us, and in order to be more likely than not sheltered (my right) from that, I choose where I walk and drive at night. I stick my lily white, reasonably affluent hand into the bee's hive, I could possibly get stung. I certainly don't mind a bee's hive, I just walk around it. I realize most of the bees are good bees. They're not who I'm worried about.

I'm only referring to the bus shelters. To this middle-aged, corporate desk jockey working in the suburbs, they're a bit unnerving. I don't drive down Lishey Avenue at night either. My caution rarely, nowadays, get tossed into the wind.

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To address safety concerns about the Deadrick St. bus station, I just want to say a few words.

I ride the bus daily and typically have to wait a few minutes at the transfer station, and yes, I stick out like a sore thumb. But rest assured i feel quite safe, even considering everyone can see that I have my $400 iPod with me.

A few things to keep in mind:

1. These people are hard-working-- There is a reason they are waiting on a bus at whenever time of night, they just got off work. They want to go home, just like everyone else, and probably aren't thinking about commiting any crime. Also, many work in the service industry and are paid cash. They have just as much to lose as the next person.

2. If homeless, just say "sorry"-- Deadrick St. is one of the only places in town that is populated 24/7. They just see it as a high-turnover area. If approached for money, a smoke or anything, just say "sorry, I'm out" and I promise you will be left alone. Don't be naive, and keep tabs on you wallet, but if these people were any good at lifting a wallet, they wouldn't be homeless.

3. It's not a cool hangout-- Having spent countless hours there I have never seen any socializing(besides school kids gossiping before a bus) and have never been offered any drugs. There are much better places for people to hang out, and ponder their next score.

4. Safety in numbers-- EVERYONE here is a little uncomfortable. Most would rather be in their own car. Rarely does anyone commit a serious crime when there are dozens (or hundreds) of witnesses within feet.

Just wanted to let everyone know to stay at ease on this street. I own a car, and have the means to get myself around. I ride the bus because I enjoy it. I skip the stress, forget about the traffic, have time to use my computer and catch up on work. I also hope that my daily fare makes a tiny impact on the future of mass transit in our great city. AND I FEEL SAFE!

I encourage everyone to use the bus system and enjoy! :DMTA homepage maps/schedules

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Why are people afraid of people in the bus shelters?? Your fears are unfounded, and you are promoting an already-negative image of MTA and it riders. You guys need some diversity training! Homeless people don't always hang out on this street, and I honestly don't think it's fair to equate 'young punks' with 'drug dealers.' I dislike that 'us' vs. 'them' mentality. They are Nashvillians just like you, and they might just appreciate their life as much as you appreciate yours. If someone talks to you and makes you uncomfortable, that's as much your problem than theirs. You decide how you react. There are much, much worse parts of Nashville. I just ask that you don't generalize people into categories like that. It's ignorant. All Nashvillians have the right to use public areas as long as they aren't breaking laws. Who wouldn't want to hang out at the public square? It's a pleasant place for *everyone* to enjoy.

Hey, actually I do ride the bus when I'm in town (as I do in Chicago), although lots and lots of people who live in Nashville look at me like I'm crazy when I tell them that and express a fear for my safety that I do not share. Like I said, the homeless people who were present didn't bother me - I actually had a nice conversation with one gentleman along the route - it was the groups of young guys who actually come up to me, physically got in my face and gave me hassles, and actually made pretty unfounded generalizations about me suggesting that I was a threat to them if I were law enforcement, which I obviously am not. I've lived in Chicago for 13 years, so I'm used to homeless people as well as diverse populations. But a little bit of security presence could go a long way towards keeping the troublemakers in check - even for the safety of the homeless people!

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Hey, actually I do ride the bus when I'm in town (as I do in Chicago), although lots and lots of people who live in Nashville look at me like I'm crazy when I tell them that and express a fear for my safety that I do not share. Like I said, the homeless people who were present didn't bother me - I actually had a nice conversation with one gentleman along the route - it was the groups of young guys who actually come up to me, physically got in my face and gave me hassles, and actually made pretty unfounded generalizations about me suggesting that I was a threat to them if I were law enforcement, which I obviously am not. I've lived in Chicago for 13 years, so I'm used to homeless people as well as diverse populations. But a little bit of security presence could go a long way towards keeping the troublemakers in check - even for the safety of the homeless people!

I definately understand why your experience was frustrating. No one likes to be pre-judged. Often the term "prejudice" is directly translated as "racist". But we all know that it applies to anything. Race/religion/sex/social status/weight/hairstyle/attire/what you carry/which direction your looking can all be considered a threat to someone. Confidence is what protects someone in this situation.

Anyways... there is ALWAYS some police presence on Dedrick St.(although sometimes very light), but hopefully when the new transit hub is completed this will help matters.

P.S.- In my humble opinion, the recent(since Oct. 1st) service reduction of certain bus lines is a great crime against Nashvillians!

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It really is, and as well it really stinks that just when the Music City Star was starting out this happens and could hurt it in a major way.

not to mention that transit ridership is up a significant amount. something like 14% for two years in a row. this goes to show how little the public/government around here care about alternate transportation!

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wasn't it nashville's bday the other day?

anyone else hear about that..

and that they were having a lil celebration at the courthouse park??

i thought i saw it on the news... :dontknow:

It wasn't the city's birthday, it was the 200th anniversary of the original city charter being signed (Nashville was incorporated in 1806).

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