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I was wondering that myself Bryde. What's up with that??

I guess it is meant to force people out of the lots and on to the side walks. Creating more "foot traffic" on the side walks and no just hanging out in the lots.

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Now we just need some more sky-scrapers and a bit more Waterfront Development  . Would not mind seeing an organization formed to restore the Garden District too! 

Meant to post in this thread...instead of posting in the top-heavy Plan BR thread the other day      

Glad to see this will finally get off the ground soon! Like the rendering with part of the Hilton Capitol House in the background   Business Report Real Estate Property of the Week Developers ar

This could have gone in a bunch of different threads. There is a ton of interesting information in this article. I wish I could be at this meeting. Also, I can't wait for Tuesday to see what the new restuarant will be in the Stroube

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Nice article I read in this mornings paper!

Going to be a active August DDD Meeting! Wish I could be there this coming Tuesday. 07' is begining to break-thru!!!!! All the projects so close to each other; II City Plaza; Shaw Center II Phase; and new Courthouse is going to dramatically change the look around North Blvd!

I'm still waiting to see Shaw Center's final phase with the Onyxx Bldg. on Third at Convention. 6 to 8-story lofts??

The Brownstones are nice..but may fit better on the fringes of downtown. Laurel Tower was maybe too much a reach?? it falling-thru was a disapiontment, the tower would have looked nice between Chase Tower and One America Place. The developer(Camm Morton) has been so sucessful with numerous projects he just went for it! But it just didn't workout.

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I like the brownstones but I do't lie the crazy location right in the middle of the CDB.

I agree, I like the whole idea of brownstones but I think right in the middle of downtown is not an ideal location. They will totally look out of place there especially if anything bigger and taller goes up in that area. I think brownstones would have worked better on Nicholson Dr.

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http://www.businessreport.com/news/2007/aug/13/livin-large/

Livin' large

ONE ELEVEN: A dozen contemporary-style apartments , some of which will overlook teh Roux House on Third Street, will be built next to the Shaw Center.

By

Monday, August 13, 2007

Like many cities around the country, Baton Rouge has spent the better part of two decades trying to transform its sleepy downtown into a thriving urban center.

It's making progress. Consider what the Shaw Center for the Arts and Friday evening concerts have done to attract crowds to a business district that used to roll up the pavement religiously at 5 p.m.Yet a big piece of the puzzle remains missing-namely, places for people to live. Only 1,000 residential units exist in what is considered the downtown area and only about 1% of those are actually in the business district, with the rest lying in nearby Spanish Town and Beauregard Town.

"The residential component is essential to downtown redevelopment; it's paramount," says Davis Rhorer, director of the Downtown Development District. "We don't have that right now."

But that is about to change with the groundbreaking of two residential developments that will add nearly 100 new units of affordable housing to the heart of the CBD by the end of 2009. The projects, which are being done by the Baton Rouge Area Foundation through its developer, Commercial Properties, will be the first new residential projects downtown in some 50 years and, if successful, could do for downtown living what the Shaw Center and Tsunami did for its nightlife.

THE BROWNSTONES: These 70-unit apartments, resembling the brownstones lining New York's sidewalks, will be bigger than those at One Eleven, and possibly even less expensive.

"This is the next step in the evolution of downtown," Rhorer says. "It will forever change the dynamics of downtown."

In more ways than one. Consider that the projects will add nearly 10% of housing virtually overnight to the available downtown stock. More significantly, they will make the urban living experience available to a broader group of middle-income workers and 20-somethings who will bring with them diversity and a customer base for the restaurants and retailers who are expected to follow.

"We're building a project that's affordable in terms of the state-worker model," BRAF President John Davies says. "We want to make this an affordable option for state workers."

http://69.2.58.22/open-ads/adclick.php?n=a30c8f50

The projects kick off more or less simultaneously this week. The first is a 12-unit apartment complex called One Eleven that will be constructed in a new building next to the Shaw Center on what is known as Rue Albritton, the paved walkway on Third Street leading into the building. The mixed-use structure will have office space on its bottom floor and apartments on the top three. Architects Remson-Haley-Herpin designed the building.

The contemporary-style residential units will range in size from 850 to 1,000 square feet, not including balconies, and will rent for $1,000 to $1,200 a month. The flats on the second floor will be either one- or two-bedroom units, while the third and fourth floors will offer split-level, loft-style apartments with 13-foot ceilings. Upper-level apartments will also have a second balcony, which will overlook Rue Albritton and the patio of the popular Roux House bar next door.

"The question the 50-somethings ask us is, 'Who wants to live above a bar?'" says Commercial Properties' Camm Morton, who has worked in partnership with BRAF since 2002. "The answer we get from the 20- and 30-somethings is, 'We do.'"

As currently envisioned, the office space on the first floor of One Eleven would be occupied by the Arts Council of Greater Baton Rouge, which will relocate from its current headquarters in the old Bogan Fire Station on Laurel Street. Having the Arts Council in a complex with the Shaw Center for the Arts seems logical enough and planners hope to foster a natural synergy between the city's major arts organization and its premier arts venue.

"Their location in One Eleven would be a tremendous asset to the Shaw Center," Rhorer says.

Another element of the plan at the Shaw Center calls for converting the long-abandoned Stroube's Building on the corner of Third Street and North Boulevard into a New York-style steakhouse. Capital City Grill owner Rick Volland will own and run the establishment, which will have a bar indoors as well as on the second-floor terrace. The tentative name of the restaurant is Stroube's Chop House, in recognition of the historic building in which it will be located.

"Basically it's going to be an upscale but casual steakhouse/chop house," Volland says. "We'll have a lot of booths with rich, dark wood."

Commercial Properties' other new development, The Brownstones, will be five blocks away on Laurel and Fifth Streets, near the old Bogan Fire Station. It will be built on the site of what is an existing parking lot, the abandoned New Richmond Apartments building and two former state office buildings, all acquired several years ago by Commercial Properties Realty Trust. It will consist of 70 residential units designed to resemble in appearance and ambience New York's brownstone-style apartments.

Like the units at One Eleven, The Brownstones will initially be built as apartments, though some may eventually be converted to condos, and will average some 1,000 square feet with rents about $1,200 a month. Parking will be sub-grade, with 100 spaces underneath the first-floor units, and the entire building will sit four stories high.

"They'll be a little bigger than the apartments at the Shaw Center but will rent for the same price point-maybe even a little cheaper," Morton says.

STROUBE'S CHOP HOUSE: Its tentative name in recognition of the historic building on Third Street and North Boulevard, Capital City Grill owner Rick Volland will open a New York-style steakhouse.

Restaurants, as well as some retail, are also planned for The Brownstones, which was designed by Chenevert Architects. Plans call for a redevelopment of the Bogan Fire Station, which will house smaller eateries and shops, as well as office space. That building will connect to The Brownstones by a contemporary glass structure that will serve as the main entranceway for both the apartment complex and the retail/office building.

"We've had discussions with quite a few upscale groceries and pharmacies that are interested in being down there," Morton says. "There are also quite a few companies looking for office space downtown."

The total price tag for both developments is projected to be in the $20 million range, with One Eleven estimated to cost around $4 million and The Brownstones approximately $15 million, including the Bogan Fire Station redevelopment. The restaurant at Stroube's will be a build-out, meaning Volland and Commercial Properties will share the cost, estimated to exceed $2 million.

While that's not a whole lot of money for a development that will impact and change the dynamics of the entire downtown area, it is a good deal of green for projects that will depend almost solely on mid-market rental rates to carry the conventionally-financed note. How do Commercial Properties and BRAF intend to make it work?

For one thing, land acquisition isn't an issue. The state owns the site for the One Eleven development and has an agreement with BRAF to develop it for residential use. As for The Brownstones' site, Commercial Property Realty Trust owns that property outright, which includes the parking lots, New Richmond Apartments building and state office buildings. The REIT acquired the parcels and buildings three years ago for an undisclosed amount that Morton says averaged slightly more than $30 a square foot. That was market rate at the time but a good deal less than the $60-plus per square foot comparable downtown property is going for today.

Morton says that doesn't really make a difference in terms of how he is able to make the developments affordable.

"You still have to make a return on your investment so whether I have debt or not is inconsequential," he says.

Still, with downtown property selling for more than $60 a foot in some cases today, compared to say $15 a foot by Towne Center and $3 a foot in nearby suburban parishes, land acquisition costs can be a considerable barrier to creating affordable places to live downtown. Having the property free and clear with no debt makes The Brownstones more doable than they might otherwise be.

Commercial Properties can tackle a project that other developers might shy away from for two key reasons. First, the company's sizeable financial resources allow the company to wait a longer period of time-years longer if necessary-to recover its investment. Second, that financial strength and its association with BRAF allows for a greater risk tolerance on projects deemed critical to the betterment of the local community.

Still, Commercial Properties isn't a non-profit, and Morton is under investor pressure to turn a profit on the deals. Consequently the projects underwent a variety of designs as construction prices have escalated to keep costs under control.

The One Eleven project, for example, may not be large in scope, but the tight construction zone, nestled between the Shaw Center and Roux House, does present several technical and financial challenges.

The Brownstones will have sub-grade parking as opposed to a structured lot, which will a save some $2 million. Also, The Brownstones is being constructed as a low-rise rather than the high-rise that was originally envisioned. That essentially cuts the cost of the project in half.

"Basically we're trying to compete with suburbia by using suburbia tools in a downtown setting," he says.

Moreover, BRAF's Davies says Commercial Properties is willing to take a smaller return on investment than what another developer might be able to take

"We're doing this for the social benefits," Davies says. "We made a decision as a board that we can take an under-market return in order to make improvements to the quality of life in the Baton Rouge area and to advance the Plan Baton Rouge plan, which calls for having an exciting, 24-hour urban city."

Perhaps, but Morton bristles at the notion Commercial Properties is not out to make a profit on the deals. "We have a board, we have investors and we have to pay taxes like everyone else," he says. "This is a great project, but we wouldn't do it unless we could turn a profit."

Developing both complexes as apartments, rather than condos, will also help make the deal an easier sell to the banks that will be asked to finance it once it gets under way. Condo financing is getting tougher in many markets around the country, as banks worry about overbuilding. While that's not so much a problem in Baton Rouge yet, financing apartment construction is easier because lenders don't require pre-selling before agreeing to back the deal.

"Apartments are easier to get started because banks will ask if there is a demand for rental and it's a pretty tight rental market downtown," Morton says. "So instead of spending the next six months pre-selling, we can build them as apartments and get started right away."

Which doesn't mean the units won't be converted into condos down the line. Morton has already received some inquiries about doing that, which suggests to him a demand for affordable owner-occupied housing downtown. But for now, he's going after the rental market, which he thinks will be relatively easy given the limited scope of the project.

"There are an awful lot of people who want to be downtown," Morton says. "I don't need a very big piece of pie to make this work."

There's no market survey to indicate just how strong that demand actually is, but there is the experience of other cities in the South, which have seen demand for downtown living go through the roof in recent years. Consider that Raleigh, N.C., will have nearly 8,000 residential units by the end of 2009, compared to 5,300 today. In downtown Nashville, Tenn., the number of units is projected to top 5,000 before the end of the decade, compared to some 2,100 today, about twice as many as Baton Rouge.

"We have waiting lists four-deep to get into the Royal Bank of Canada building, one of our newest high-end condos," says Tracey Lovejoy, vice president of the Downtown Raleigh Alliance, adding that merely to hold a spot on that list costs $5,000.

But while it has been easy in both Nashville and Raleigh to attract wealthy professionals and well-heeled empty-nesters to upscale condos that seasoned developers are only too willing to build, finding ways to build affordable, downtown housing has been a bigger challenge. Like Baton Rouge, land-acquisition costs make the deals nearly prohibitive in many instances.

"It's too expensive to build downtown because of land values," Lovejoy says. "And there doesn't seem to be a lot of public incentive to help developers. So if they're looking at building an apartment complex, for instance, I'm sure they're thinking it's just not affordable."

One way Nashville has addressed that challenge is by offering TIFs, or tax increment financing, to developers who build affordable housing. Under legislation put in place by the state, the city allows developers to fund part of their infrastructure construction costs with TIFs if they agree to set aside 20% of their units for so-called work force housing. To qualify for work force housing, a renter or buyer has to earn at least 80% of the state's median family income, which would be $32,000 a year for a single person.

Photo by Brian Baiamonte

THE NEXT STEP: Downtown Development District's Davis Rhorer says the residential component is the next step in downtown's evolution.

"That would be a good salary for someone starting out," says Tom Turner, president and CEO of the Nashville Downtown Partnership. "That's exactly the kind of people you want living downtown."

TIFs are not a legitimate option for Louisiana because of the state's unique tax structure. Besides, they only go so far in offsetting the high cost of downtown land, which is as expensive in Nashville as in Baton Rouge. But even if TIFs are not a viable solution for Baton Rouge per se, they suggest that creative solutions involving public-private partnership exist when there is a will to create them.

Another challenge Nashville and Raleigh have faced is in attracting groceries and other stores to their downtowns, despite the growing number of residents. Major retailers typically don't look at an area until it has 10,000 residential units or more, and while Raleigh has waiting lists to get into its upscale condos, it still lacks a critical mass of middle-income residents.

"You have to figure out how to get to 10,000 units to get retailers to look at you, and that's what we're trying to do," Lovejoy says. "I think the question is, 'Do we really have the population to get to that level?'"

Baton Rouge is still a long way from having to answer those kinds of questions, but it also will need more retailers and grocers for downtown to continue to grow. Morton says he's heard from some specialty grocers who are interested in opening near The Brownstones. Plans are also on the drawing board for even more affordable housing in the Onyyx Building at the corner of Third and Convention. The building has been eyed as a possible site for an artists' colony, with small units specifically designed to attract the visual and performing artists who bring to diversity and culture to a city but typically live on a shoestring.

That would be good news to those at Forum 35, the local civic group of young professionals, which has been pushing for downtown housing as low as $600 to $800 a month. The group's president is enthused by the plans for the new developments and believes it's a good first step, but she would like to see developments with units that are even more affordable.

"It would be great to have something a little less expensive for the arts community and for people just getting out of college who want to live in the hip place in Baton Rouge," says Heather Sewell Day, president of Forum 35.

Downtown advocates believe that will follow, though it will take time. It's like a chicken-and-egg phenomenon. With a critical mass of residents will come more infrastructure and commerce, which will attract more residents who will create a demand for more housing at different price points. How long it will take remains to be seen, but Day joins others in believing Baton Rouge is on the brink of explosive downtown growth.

"I think the young people are going to demand it and there are a lot of 30-somethings who are here to stay," she says. "We want a more progressive Baton Rouge. If we're going to be here, we want to make it cool."

Edited by Gauge
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Nice to see the next wave of development in downtown!

The Brownstones should compliment Main Street Market a block away. And give some of the state workers a place to live close by. Hopefully the grocery & pharmacy will be coming too. What do yall think of the "sub-grade" parking; that's showing about 3-feet above the sidewalk??

The linnear building looks way cool with 13-foot ceilings on the third and fourth floor.; the Stroubes building looks nice too.

I will be interested to see some future renderings of the Onyxx building lofts on Third at Convention. $600-800 monthly is more like it! The Shaw Center block will be the hippest block around!

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Nice to see the next wave of development in downtown!

The Brownstones should compliment Main Street Market a block away. And give some of the state workers a place to live close by. Hopefully the grocery & pharmacy will be coming too. What do yall think of the "sub-grade" parking; that's showing about 3-feet above the sidewalk??

The linnear building looks way cool with 13-foot ceilings on the third and fourth floor.; the Stroubes building looks nice too.

I will be interested to see some future renderings of the Onyxx building lofts on Third at Convention. $600-800 monthly is more like it! The Shaw Center block will be the hippest block around!

I can't seem to picture the Onyxx building. Does anyone have a photo?

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Sure, no problem yall.... :thumbsup: The Onyxx Bldg. is on the left where you see the signs City Year

I have heard possibly 6 to 8 stories(maybe 30-units??) in the past...with going vertical seemingly so $expensive, who knows?? It should be very nice none the less.

downtown051cm0.jpg

Down on the far right is the renovated Hilton Capitol Center; Third Street parking garage (left) where I want to try and recommend a Lamar Digitall Billboard to go up on brackets braced to the side! I little Times Square theme to compliment the retro Coca Cola sign a block away on Third Street.

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Here is the article from the website I just found....

http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/business/9154281.html

--Morton said the nearby Onyxx building, whose redevelopment into a 30-unit apartment building has been on the horizon, could also hold something new for downtown, possibly a cooking school, though those plans are further down the line.

--Morton also told the group he

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  • 3 months later...

Entertainment district regulations might go before Metro Council early next year

Some of the rules and regulations for a proposed Third Street arts and entertainment district could go before the Metro Council for approval during the first three months of 2008, downtown officials say. Jeff Fluhr, Downtown Development District assistant director, says the regulations will cover issues such as streetscaping and design standards, along with plans for closing streets for major events. Future regulations, such as tax incentives for some downtown businesses, will be discussed later on in 2008. The DDD approved its operating budget and a list of goals and objectives for 2008 at its monthly meeting today. Included on the list are plans to select a project/design team for the first phase of the Riverfront Master Plan during the first quarter and to resume a matching grant fa

Edited by richyb83
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  • 1 month later...

Panel will review plan for district

http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/business/13913887.html

The Arts & Entertainment District Committee will meet 5 p.m. Tuesday and Jan. 29 on the third floor of the Baton Rouge Area Foundation building on Fourth Street to go over the ordinance line by line. The meeting is open to the public.

The effort to create a defined district to encourage arts and entertainment development, create unified design standards and look at policy changes that could make the district unique began in late 2006 but has been quiet for about six months.

That ordinance contains design guidelines planners hope will improve the aesthetics and economic prospects for the area bounded on the south by North Boulevard, including Galvez Plaza, to the north by Main Street, to the west by the west edge of River Road and to the east by the western-most right-of-way line of Fourth Street.

The eastern boundary is drawn the way it is to incorporate some streets right off Third Street that include businesses and lots that the committee felt are ripe for arts and entertainment development.

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Panel will review plan for district

http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/business/13913887.html

The Arts & Entertainment District Committee will meet 5 p.m. Tuesday and Jan. 29 on the third floor of the Baton Rouge Area Foundation building on Fourth Street to go over the ordinance line by line. The meeting is open to the public.

The effort to create a defined district to encourage arts and entertainment development, create unified design standards and look at policy changes that could make the district unique began in late 2006 but has been quiet for about six months.

That ordinance contains design guidelines planners hope will improve the aesthetics and economic prospects for the area bounded on the south by North Boulevard, including Galvez Plaza, to the north by Main Street, to the west by the west edge of River Road and to the east by the western-most right-of-way line of Fourth Street.

The eastern boundary is drawn the way it is to incorporate some streets right off Third Street that include businesses and lots that the committee felt are ripe for arts and entertainment development.

Okay explain to me what they are talking about when they say "aesthetics". Are they talking about the outside of the buildings? Because I don't really want the historic buildings to have to be redesigned. They should be able to keep their historic look. Now if they are talking about certain colors that would be okay.

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  • 4 weeks later...

This is just what the doctor ordered; I can only hope this prime venue would find it's way Downtown?? :dontknow: If not, my 2nd guess would be at Esplanade(College/Corporate Blvd.) where the W a Loft was supposed to go?? And the 3rd choice would be somewhere down the booming Bluebonnet corridor??

BR is on the list with some impressive cities across the U.S. :thumbsup: A Hard Rock Cafe or Dave & Buster and a small Cinema would make a great entertainment complex along with a music venue??

Upscale bowling could be coming to B.R.

http://www.businessreport.com/archives/daily-report/latest/

AMF Bowling Centers is set to launch Avenue E, an upscale bowling alley, and Baton Rouge might be one of the first markets. The company plans to open six to eight Avenue E locations in the next two years, with the first planned for metro Phoenix. Along with Baton Rouge, other potential locations include Kansas City, Mo., Charlotte, N.C., and San Antonio, Texas. Avenue E will feature first-class bar and restaurant facilities, along with private lanes, party rooms and oversized arcades with up to 100 games. AMF operates more than 350 bowling centers across the U.S.

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More Info

"AMF to Launch Second New Center Concept

- AMF Bowling Centers, Inc. Merrell Wreden, 804-559-8643 [email protected] Following the successful introduction of 300, its upscale bowling brand, AMF Bowling Centers, Inc. announced today that it will launch a new entertainment center concept under the brand Avenue E.

"This is a major step in the evolution of our business," said Fred Hipp, AMF's President and CEO.

"Anchored with bowling, Avenue E will include a selection of games and attractions designed to appeal to both adults and families with kids. We'll also include a first class bar and casual dining restaurant, focusing our menu on pizza, freshly prepared in an open kitchen."

"A little more than two years ago, we introduced our 300 brand of upscale bowling centers," added Hipp. "That concept has been very successful, and we now have six 300s operating, with another five in the construction or late planning stages. We believe that Avenue E will be the perfect complement to our portfolio of traditional and upscale bowling centers."

AMF expects to open six to eight Avenue E locations over the next two years, with the first planned for Surprise, Arizona in the metro Phoenix area. Markets either planned or under consideration for openings are: Kansas City, MO, Baton Rouge, LA, Charlotte, NC and San Antonio, TX, among others.

Facilities will range from 50,000 to 60,000 square feet. Plans include a dramatic media environment with premium Xtreme® bowling, end-to-end video screens over the lanes and flat panel TV's throughout the bar area. Each facility will have a minimum of six private lanes, as well as party rooms adjacent to the oversized amusement area that will feature as many as 100 interactive games and attractions"

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^ That sure looks interesting! It could be part of larger entertainment complex with cinema; arcade/laser tag; restuarants; open-space, etc. I wonder where the bowling alley will go?? The list of other cities is really impressive too!

WHAT's UP WITH THIS :dontknow: across the street from the Hilton Capitol Center??? They took the infamous blue tarp off about a month ago?? Last year? just before a major convention (with leaders from other cities) that were going to be staying, at the hotel, Mayor Holden was so embarrased of the building that it would be seen from across street; he had a big blue tarp cover it all up.

Trahan architects now owns the building with plans of possible mixed-use of street level retail?; Trahans offices on the top floor(s); resdiential....adding a few more floors. But I have heard nothing recent.

This is the Jumonville warehouse on Lafayette Street; it has the potential to be redeveloped into something nice. Wonder how much longer the wait will be??

feb08026hu9.jpg

Right next to it is the Old State National Life warehouse (next to Jumonville warehouse); I thought the possible plan was to open a Jazz Club; maybe sprinkle a lil' Reggae??

feb08027xq8.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

What do yall think???

My only request for the "new" Arts & Entertainment District downtown....

Remove the billboard ordinance to make exception for a Lamar "Digital" billboard mounted & braced against the Third Street parking garage. One council woman said she never wants to see another billboard downtown. I understand the conventional giant pole is not very attractive; so do this instead, no pole necessary.

From this....Convention Street and Third Street

feb08022im6.jpg

to this.... :shades: (pardon the art work)

The sign would only be a block from the neon/retro-Coca Cola sign on Florida at Third; and new Schlitz & Giggles neon-sign. It could give BR a "mini" version of Times Square. Why do so many other parts of BR like Corporate Blvd, I-10, I-12, Bluebonnet, Sherwood Forest Blvd, etc. get the special advantage of having a awesome-looking digital billboard??? And Downtown get the shaft; left out??

feb08022wf2.jpg

This would compliment the entire Third Street corridor and the hotels next door.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Thanks twstd :thumbsup:

Here is an "opinion" article for downtown from the "Our Views" section of the Advocate.

Yet downtown Baton Rouge is rapidly becoming a lively meeting place after work hours, much more so than anyone would have predicted a dozen years ago.

The design district

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