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Single people now the majority


Carter711

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Single people, for the first time on record, now officially outnumber married people.

Single 50.3%

Married 49.7%

This is part of a decades long trend - just five years ago married people made up 52% of the population. Every state has seen a decline in married couples, but the South has seen the greatest decline over the last five years. Texas, Tennessee, and the Carolinas saw significant declines. On the other hand, the number of unmarried couples has increased fairly significantly. Some analysts attribute this to a greater acceptance of homosexuality. Gay couples are forbidden from marriage in every state except Massachusetts. Single heterosexual couples also appear to be waiting a great deal longer before marriage.

This could spell good news for cities, as single people are much more likely to reside in them than their married counterparts.

To be Married Means to be Outnumbered

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/15/us/15cen...artner=homepage

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This must come as a huge blow to religious fundies. Their stubborn belief that the "nuclear family" is the norm is now challenged by actual statistics. And of course they prefer people to be married, and not live in sin. This wish of their's is almost funny.

The nuclear family may be the ideal, but it is certainly no longer the norm. That shows how our culture has liberalized over the past decades. People feel more free to live the lifestyle of their choice, and not "automatically" get married out of high school, as was generally done in the past.

I see this as a plus. It shows people are waiting longer. Waiting longer means a higher possibilty of marital success.

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Here's something interesting: Of single heterosexual men, ages 25-34, 53% said they were not interested in getting married anytime soon, 22% of men said they had absolutely no interest in marrying anytime.

http://marriage.rutgers.edu/Publications/S...EXTSOOU2004.htm

These numbers are the increase, and dramatically increased from before the 1960s. Marriage isn't an attractive option, and I think it's because of the financial and legal risks that it entails.

It could be the other way around and women don't want to marry, but from my position the above looks to be true.

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It's the opposite here. People keep saying "yeah, maybe I'll get married when I'm 30" and things like that. They see marriage as too much commitment when they have jobs and other responsibilities.

I have one friend that is married, because he wanted to tie the knot before going off to Iraq. They had planned on having kids soon, but have since decided to wait until he is out of hte military and has established his own business. That will mean late 20s for them, something that is becoming the norm.

When people are going to school until they are 22 or so and even longer and then have to struggle with finding jobs, it is hard to have a steady relationship that can become a marriage. Others question the point of marrying.

We shouldn't be applauding statistics htat say marriage is declining.. because it is declining for all the wrong reasons.

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Part of the reason many young people are delaying marriage is that the entry-level jobs they tend to hold don't pay the bills the way they used to. Wages haven't even come close to keeoing up with inflation, and many people in their twenties can barely support themselves, let alone a family.

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Single people, for the first time on record, now officially outnumber married people.

Single 50.3%

Married 49.7%

This is part of a decades long trend - just five years ago married people made up 52% of the population. Every state has seen a decline in married couples, but the South has seen the greatest decline over the last five years. Texas, Tennessee, and the Carolinas saw significant declines. On the other hand, the number of unmarried couples has increased fairly significantly. Some analysts attribute this to a greater acceptance of homosexuality. Gay couples are forbidden from marriage in every state except Massachusetts. Single heterosexual couples also appear to be waiting a great deal longer before marriage.

This could spell good news for cities, as single people are much more likely to reside in them than their married counterparts.

To be Married Means to be Outnumbered

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/15/us/15cen...artner=homepage

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You wouldn't know it here! Folks still get married early here, it blows me away to see it. I'd never known anybody who was my age (college age) who was married or even thinking about getting married till we moved here. I'd be willing to bet well over 50% of the households here are married couples, probably even close to 70%.

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Part of the reason many young people are delaying marriage is that the entry-level jobs they tend to hold don't pay the bills the way they used to. Wages haven't even come close to keeoing up with inflation, and many people in their twenties can barely support themselves, let alone a family.
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I am not allowed to get married unless I move my gay self to fabulous but too cold Massachusetts :ph34r: That aside, I would encourage other people not to rush into marriage and live together first for awhile and see how it goes. I love the freedom of being single, being able to do whatever I want whenever and not having to worry about someone else's schedule and their issues. Even when I was in past relationships I never wanted to live with my partner and take on all the domestic baggage that goes with cohabitating. I think I am a professional loner.

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I am not allowed to get married unless I move my gay self to fabulous but too cold Massachusetts :ph34r: That aside, I would encourage other people not to rush into marriage and live together first for awhile and see how it goes. I love the freedom of being single, being able to do whatever I want whenever and not having to worry about someone else's schedule and their issues. Even when I was in past relationships I never wanted to live with my partner and take on all the domestic baggage that goes with cohabitating. I think I am a professional loner.
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Also I think a lot of people are pursuing education even at late ages. As someone who has considered going to law school next year it's difficult to contemplate marriage when you don't feel comfortable with your current affluence (or in my case, a lack thereof :D ). Young people today seem to want affluence a lot more than our parents did and we tend to want it a lot sooner, causing people to work harder and not focus as much on marriage. Not sure if this makes sense; it makes sense in my head.
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