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Mith242

Murfreesboro Diamonds

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A Wisconsin man recently found a 5.47 carat canary diamond recently. It looked like a piece of lemon candy and doesn't have any flaws. It's estimated to be worth around $15,000 to $60,000. It's the second biggest diamond found so far this year. Earlier in September a Texas couple found a 6.35 carat brown diamond. The largest diamond found at the park, and the country for that matter, was the Uncle Sam diamond in 1924. It was a 40.23 white diamond.

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The guy's from Wisconsin? He should have to give it back. Some of those Wisconsin people @ the Capitol One Bowl were downright rude. I can't believe they get the win AND the diamond. ;)

The Arkansas Times had an article about a book that was being written regarding the diamond trade, with a section devoted to the history of diamond minning in Arkansas. I don't remember the name of the book, or the author, but the exerpt was very interesting. Apparently, the DeBeers people had some folks killed in order to keep Arkansas from opening the world's only government-owned diamond mine for commercial production. The DeBeers people feared the competiton.

Does anybody know what book I'm talking about?

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The guy's from Wisconsin? He should have to give it back. Some of those Wisconsin people @ the Capitol One Bowl were downright rude. I can't believe they get the win AND the diamond. ;)

The Arkansas Times had an article about a book that was being written regarding the diamond trade, with a section devoted to the history of diamond minning in Arkansas. I don't remember the name of the book, or the author, but the exerpt was very interesting. Apparently, the DeBeers people had some folks killed in order to keep Arkansas from opening the world's only government-owned diamond mine for commercial production. The DeBeers people feared the competiton.

Does anybody know what book I'm talking about?

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No can't say I've heard anything about that book. But yeah DeBeers does have a huge hand in the diamond business. I've heard they stockpile them and only let a little out at a time to keep demand and prices up.

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DeBeers has a virtual monopoly. Apparently there are some diamonds in Russia that may end up breaking this up.

Commercial-grade diamonds are synthetic. I don't think the technology was always there to make these.

The diamond mine in Murfreesboro wasn't large enough and doesn't produce high enough quality diamonds to make any kind of difference in the diamond market. I think it's kind of a neat and unique attraction to be able to go look for them, I guess the fun is just in playing in the dirt with your kids.

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The guy's from Wisconsin? He should have to give it back. Some of those Wisconsin people @ the Capitol One Bowl were downright rude. I can't believe they get the win AND the diamond. ;)

The Arkansas Times had an article about a book that was being written regarding the diamond trade, with a section devoted to the history of diamond minning in Arkansas. I don't remember the name of the book, or the author, but the exerpt was very interesting. Apparently, the DeBeers people had some folks killed in order to keep Arkansas from opening the world's only government-owned diamond mine for commercial production. The DeBeers people feared the competiton.

Does anybody know what book I'm talking about?

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Yeah. DeBeers has done some pretty "questionable" practices in the name of business. (I'm using euphemisms here.)

That's basically what the movie "Blood Diamond" is about right now. I intend to see it, and my sister recommends it.

Basically, DeBeers has played a key role in fomenting the civil wars in Africa in order to keep a monopoly.

That's why you see some politically-conscious (or whatever you want to call it) people who, for engagement, are not buying diamonds in protest. Kudos to them.

By keeping a monopoly on diamonds, they can hold back the diamond supply in the world, thereby increasing demand and therein profits. This information is all readily searchable in google.

As a sidenote, "Who killed the electric car?" is a well-made documentary that analyzes similar business tactics employed by DeBeers, except for the car/oil industries. Basically, a few greedy corporations (mainly oil, but in cahoots with car) shut down the production of electric cars, and even went after owners of the new pure-electric (not hybrid) cars to relinquish them (they were on lease). They used a bait and switch tactic, through the current president, pushing fuel cell cars (a technology I actually did experimentation on!) because they still use fossil fuels and they are developing much more slowly technologically (i.e. more profits on gas-burning cars in the meanwhile). These electric cars were getting 100-200 miles per charge, and could be charged in home. They performed just as well--if not better--than regular cars. (Here's a good third-party electric-car company that's still alive and kicking: http://teslamotors.com/index.php?js_enabled=1).

Business can be downright evil.

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Interesting you brought up the story, I need to see that movie. It's interesting how San Francisco didn't remove the trolley lines the way most other cities did. Apparently one old lady that rode the line daily became a big civic activist and the city rallied behind her to keep them. At first they were seen as outdated and awkward but eventually they became a city treasure.

Little Rock once had a really extensive streetcar system, which it ditched in the 1950s as pretty much every other city did for gasoline buses.

As an interesting aside, my family moved here from Ontario in the 1910s to convert the streetcar system from gas to electric and liked the area so much they stayed. My greatgrandfather and his brother ran the trolley system for many years.

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A Canuck? Why I never.

I assume you also brought up the trolley thing because many automobile companies bought trolley systems to dismantle them: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Motor...tcar_conspiracy

"Who killed the electric car?" should be in your local movie rental place. I just happened upon it here at one of the 3 local Movie Gallerys (a new movie chain that just usurped and bankrupted blockbuster here).

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Interesting you brought up the story, I need to see that movie. It's interesting how San Francisco didn't remove the trolley lines the way most other cities did. Apparently one old lady that rode the line daily became a big civic activist and the city rallied behind her to keep them. At first they were seen as outdated and awkward but eventually they became a city treasure.

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