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cityboi

History and facts about North Carolina's interstates

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There were certain states this would end up being a godsend for in terms of economic development and getting better integrated into the nation and world, NC being no exception. The Triangle Research Park as well, funny, I think you can point to a handful of events like these to making a place prominent versus left behind. Now if we can just connect CLT and ILM.

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Great link.

The 40 extension to Raleigh was a 60s development, the precise routing was changed around a lot, and the eastern endpoint wasn't settled until around 1980. Stretches of the other interstates in NC are really showing their age; on 85 you can really see how development of various kinds has raced down the interstate, especially from Duham south.

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There were certain states this would end up being a godsend for in terms of economic development and getting better integrated into the nation and world, NC being no exception. The Triangle Research Park as well, funny, I think you can point to a handful of events like these to making a place prominent versus left behind. Now if we can just connect CLT and ILM.

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yeah. the way to get to Raleigh used to be Highway 70 before I-40 became the main corridor

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^ I've wondered that myself. If it had, would have changed the growth patterns, not to mention the tranportation importance, of Raleigh drastically. Vacationing Northeasterners may have begun their current migrations to the area sooner and in greater number as well, it is a great Alternate History question.

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^ I've wondered that myself. If it had, would have changed the growth patterns, not to mention the tranportation importance, of Raleigh drastically. Vacationing Northeasterners may have begun their current migrations to the area sooner and in greater number as well, it is a great Alternate History question.

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Thank you, Davidals, that was interesting, I was under the impression that a highway's goal was to link major cities as well as traverse the nation, not that Raleigh was major then, but obviously more so than the fields it ended up passing through, even bypassing Wilson and Rocky Mount. I remember a lesson on the railroads and how towns that were bypassed in the 19th century usually died out. Clearly not the same as a road since they are much easier to build and you can just drive to the highway. You definately get the feeling travelling down 95 that NC was merely a thing to get through on your way to the lower South from the Northeast, other than to skirt near Fayetteville which had a military justification.

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Yeah the alighment of 95 does not make sense to me even now. A three-d link to Raleigh is a good way to make up for that.

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I know that the state has looked into completely redoing 95 into a toll road. Any info on this anywhere? I would like to see if the reroute any sections of it or completely build anew. I am already envisioning 50 years of orange barrels and single lane closures.

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I know that the state has looked into completely redoing 95 into a toll road. Any info on this anywhere? I would like to see if the reroute any sections of it or completely build anew. I am already envisioning 50 years of orange barrels and single lane closures.

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^

Not do-able without changes to both state and federal laws. The only toll interstates are roads that were constructed as toll roads, either built to interstate standards, or with precise and specific plans to upgrade (like the WVA Tpk in the 1970s/80s). At present, both state and federal laws bar putting tolls onto previously constructed roads; it's among the several pretty fundamental standards dating back to the inception of the interstate system.

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^ What were/are the reasons for these laws prohibiting conversion?

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^ What were/are the reasons for these laws prohibiting conversion?

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This I don't know though I could make some guesses.

I think the idea is that the toll should pay for the road's construction, and when that is paid off the road would become free. But several NE states don't follow this policy - tolls there are also used for ongoing maintainence. But several interstates - I-95 between Richmond & Petersburg, I-30 between Dallas & Ft Worth, I-65 between Elizabethtown and Louisville had their tolls removed during the 70s and 80s.

My other guess is that it's viewed as an arbitrary tax (putting tolls on pre-existing roads), which would shift the responsibility for the road from the state DOT to some toll authority, and in theory, states should be more efficient or disciplined in their financial planning.

And most toll roads have design specifics - like service areas and fewer exits - that would require changes to a pre-existing highway.

Personally, I support toll roads in NC, and think most of the many planned limited-access highways around the state should be built as tolls. I don't think its a good idea on the roads we already have however.

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^ Completely agree. Out of state travellers are not paying local taxes to maintain the roads they use, notably I-95. And tolls on predominantly local roads is unfair. Then again, perhaps we all need more reason to not drive so much, but there are other ways to institute such a penalty other than expensive construction for toll stations, road widenings around them, etc.

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^ Completely agree. Out of state travellers are not paying local taxes to maintain the roads they use, notably I-95. And tolls on predominantly local roads is unfair. Then again, perhaps we all need more reason to not drive so much, but there are other ways to institute such a penalty other than expensive construction for toll stations, road widenings around them, etc.

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This toll road discussion might need to go in another thread, but here's my two cents:

The plan to make I-95 a toll road at the NC state borders is a good one. The highway is falling apart and could definitely use some help in getting repaired. As a stretch that is travelled mostly by in state travellers, unlike I-40 it makes sense to charge people to use our highway. Last I heard (this may or may not be accurate) the state was trying to get the two tolls approved. I think NC has a good chance since its a good reason.

I think I-95 would've been more beneficial to NC if it went through a major city. I find it really odd that it bypasses every semi-major city along its route. Raleigh would have benefited tremendously from a N-S route through its center. Fayettville would benefit from the direct connection to Raleigh and with an E-W insterstate link to Wilmighton/Myrtle Beach as well as Charlotte. Also, a link to the Hampton Roads area would've been good too. I don't know how much of a possibility any of these are.

Toll roads can make 'dream' projects possiblity, which otherwise couldn't be built. I-540 along with better zoning standards could have made it a better project overall.

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Are toll roads generally profitable, or are there some that don't make as much money as it costs to maintain the toll stations, employees, upkeep of the roads themselves, etc.? If the purpose of the toll is to pay off the cost of the road itself, it sure seems that some toll roads have been cranking away at that task for decades...

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Are toll roads generally profitable, or are there some that don't make as much money as it costs to maintain the toll stations, employees, upkeep of the roads themselves, etc.? If the purpose of the toll is to pay off the cost of the road itself, it sure seems that some toll roads have been cranking away at that task for decades...

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